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INTERNATIONAL 




.r- V W‘=^ 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

Paris, Friday, December 30, 1994 


No. 34,785 


Russia Plans 


U.S. Reclaims Economic Self- Confidence From Japan invade 


By David E. Sanger 

New York Tuna Sentce 

. WASHINGTON — As American industry con- 
tinues its surprisingly strong expansion, the Japa- 
nese are more pessimistic that their country will 
dominate the world economy in the next century 
and Americans are more confident than at any time 
in years that they can meet Japanese competition. 

In a poll conducted this month in both countries 
by The New York Times, CBS News and Tokyo 
Broadcasting System, only 25 percent of Japanese 
said they thought their country would be the pre- 
mier economic power over the long term. Just three 
years ago, when Japanese newspapers and airwaves 
were filled with predictions of America's decline, S3 


Despite Signs 
Of Renewal 
In Rwanda, 
Danger Lurks 

By Raymond Bonner 

New York Tima Service 

KIGALI, Rwanda — Signs that life is 
returning to normal can be found every- 
where in Rwanda. A roaring crowd fills a 
Kigali s t a dium for a Sunday afternoon 
soccer maieh. The cement factory in the 
southwest is operating again. Children 
play in dirt schoolyards. Day laborers in 
t h ar green aprons pick tea on vast estates. 
And me carols of worshipers pour forth in 
a packed chinch where scores were massa- 
cred in April 

But in the six months since the end of a 
civil war that surpassed the unthinkable — 
hundreds of thousands of people were 
slaughtered and then hundreds of thou- 
sands/led — such signs mask two crucial 
unresolved problems that threaten to pitch 
this country into another cauldron of vio- 
lence. 

They are refugees and justice — too 
many of the former, too litue of the latter. 
?v Real stability within Rwanda remains 
elusive, indeed impossible, while more 
than 1 million Rwandans are still in exile 
in nei g hboring African countries. But the 
refugees will not return until they know 
they can get their house or plot of land 
back, until revenge kill in g and arbitrary 
imprisonment stop. 

And that will not happen, Rwandans 
and UN officials agree, until there is a 
judicial system that punishes those respon- 
sible for the massacres. 

For Rwanda’s leaders, recreating a 
homeland is an intimidating task, one 
made harder by the lack of international 
aid — most of which has gone thus far to 
help the refugees, not to rebuild a nation. 
It is also a test of their political strength 
and skill as they seek to re-establish trust 
in the face of new ethnic friction and the 
shadow of the former government and its 
military, now in exile with the refugees. 

Few countries have suffered the destruc- 
tion Rwanda has. The human loss is in- 
comprehensible — at least half a million of 
the Tutsi minority killed — men, women 
and children shot, stoned, hacked up with 
machetes by Hutu militiamen and soldiers. 

There may be no administrative build- 
ing in this country that still has its roof and 
windows. Offices were systematically 
looted, or simply vandalized, by officials 
of the former government before they fled. 

What unleashed this mayhem? It was 
not simply on eruption of long-simmering 

See RWANDA, Page 8 


percent expected Japan to emerge as the most im- 
portant economic superpower. 

Now, the survey shows, there is far more aware- 
ness in Japan about the economic rise of China, 
traditionally Japan's biggest competitor for influ- 
ence in Asia, than there is among Americans. A 
quarter of all Japanese identified China as the 
coining dominant economy in the world; in the 
United States, only 11 percent said a third country 
would emerge as the biggest economic power, 
though they were not specifically asked about Chi- 
na. 

The survey of 1337 Japanese and 1,147 Ameri- 
cans showed a marked improvement in the sour 
view each country took of the other only 18 months 
ago, with more Japanese and Americans describing 


relations between their two countries as “friendly." 
But the poll also indicated a growing suspicion on 
the part of Japanese citizens that the United States 
is no longer a reliable military ally. 

For the first time since 1990, when the question 
was first asked, less than 50 percent of Japanese 
expressed confidence that Washington was an ally 
they could depend upon. And for the first time, a 

er amending Se section of their^Mnerican-written 
constitution that has prevented the country from 
creating a fully capable military force, able to pro- 


ject power beyond its own shores or send troops 
overseas. 

"This is a dramatic change from the past," said 
Richard Samuels, a political scientist at the Massa- 


chusetts Institution of Technology and the author of 
a recent study of Japan's postwar military policy. 
“Fifteen years ago, you could not talk about a 
*h«n £ f. in the constitution,** be said. “Now Japanese 
politicians and the media have really transformed 
public opinion to prepare Japan for the worst case 
what happens rf the Americans cannot be de- 
pended upon for their defense.** 

Americans were also less confident they could 
rdy on Japan as an ally: A total of 67 percent said 
they could count on Japan in 1990, but in the latest 
poll the figure fell to 53 percent. Japanese also 
showed growing comfort with taking a larger role in 
international affairs 50 years after the end of World 

See POLL, Page 8 



I CO-PILOT BURIED — The casket of David Hilemon on its way to graveside in Gig Harbor, Washington, as talks with North Korea continued. Page 8. 

Finance Chief Out as Mexico Tries to Slow Peso Flow 


By Tod Robberson 

Washington Pan Serna 

MEXICO CITY — Finance Minister 
Jaime Serra Puche resigned Thursday 
amid a growing political crisis over his 
handling of a peso devaluation that has 
caused the currency to lose 40 percent of 
its value against the dollar over the past 10 
days. 

President Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de 
LcOn, moving to ease tensions among an- 
gry international investors and lure back a 


reported $8 billion that has been with- 
drawn from Mexico this month, an- 
nounced Mr. Serra Pu Che’s resignation in a 
nationally broadcast speech delayed until 
the dose of U.S. and Mexican stock mar- 
kets. 

Mr. Zedillo took the action under in- 
tense international pressure to avert a 
looming inflationary and cash-flow crisis 
caused by the devaluation, combined with 
domestic calls for him to halt a growing 
peasant uprising in southern Chiapas, 


Officials say be also will announce an 
“emergency economic program" on Mon- 
day that will include revenue-raising and 
price-stabCization measures along with a, 
plan to cm the federal budget by as much 
as 10 percent. 

Mr. Zedillo said that he had accepted 
the resignation “in order to harmonize, 
integrate and execute the emergency eco- 
nomic program with credibility and effec- 
tiveness," in a tacit acknowledgment that 
Mr. Serra Puche had lost the confidence of 


Rebel Capital, 
General Says 

But He Assures Action 
In Grozny Will Not Be 
A 'Classical* Storming 

firm York Tana Serytcr 

MOSCOW — As Russian and Chechen 


forces battled fiercely for control of the 
outskirts of Grozny, Russia’s minister of 
defense, General Pavel a Grachev, said 


ia’s minister of 


Thursday that his troops 
vance deep into the befrieg 
itaL 


tanned to ad- 

Occ h*=Ti c ap- 


Gencrai Grachev is the first Russian 
official to say that Russian troops would 
be ordered to invade the city, rather than 
blockade it 

But, in keeping with President Boris N. 
Yeltsin's promise to spare civilians and 
limit Russian casual ties, the defease minis- 
ter said at the Russian command post in 
Mozdok that Russia would not storm the 
city “in the classical sense." 

instead, he said, “the movement inside 
the city will continue in order to confiscate 
arms and liquidate criminal groups." 

Widespread opposition to Mr. Yeltsin's 
invasion is mounting, although there were 
signs in Grozny on 'Thursday that Russian 
bomber pilots were trying to destroy only 
strategic or military targets. They succeed- 
ed in blowing up one of Chechnya's major 
ml refin eries, winch is southwest of the 
city. 

Kremlin officials seem intent on seizing 
Grozny as aoon as possible. The newspa- 
oer Nezavirimava Gazeta published a con- 


the international investment community. 

The announcement followed meetings 
here Thursday and Wednesday between 
Mbr. Serra Puche and a team of Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund advisers. 

He will be replaced by communications 
and transport secretary Guillermo Ortiz 
Martinez, who until Mr. Zedillo’s Dec. 1 
inauguration had saved as second-in- 
command (rf the Finance Ministry under 

See MEXICO, Page 3 


ndential report Thursday m which Gener- 
al Grachev laid out a pun for seizing the 
city on Jan. 15. The paper said the report 
was delivered by the general at a meeting 
of the National Security Council on Dec. 
21 . 

“Assault groups are to be formed by 
Jan. 5," General Grachev is reported to 
have informed Mr. Yeltsin’s top security 
advisers. 

Apparently referring to widely reported 
incidents of field commanders refusing to 
fire on civilians, he explained that the 
advance on Grozny was delayed because 
Russian troops “did not use arms to ensure 
rapid advance when local civilians blocked 
the actions of the Russian Army units." 

General Grachev also reportedly 
warned privately of something that Rus- 
sian officials have denied publicly: that the 
defiant Chechen leader, Dzhokar Du- 
dayev, “enjoys broad support among the 
Chechen population.” 

The news service Interfax reported 
Thursday night that Mr. Dudayev had sent 
a telegram to Mr. Yeltsin saying that he 
was ready to start talks with the Russian 
team “without preconditions.'’ 

Mr. Dudayev has repeatedly alternated 
vows to fight on to the last man with 
assurances that he welcomes peace negoti- 
ations with Moscow — oaky to then raise 
the precondition that Russian troops leave 
Chechnya. 

Peace talks have so far been blocked by 
the fact that the Chechen rebels insist that 
Russian troops first withdraw from Chech- 
nya. winle Moscow demands that the Che- 
chens first disarm. 

General Boris Gromov, a hero of the 
Afghan war and deputy minister of de- 
fense, is the most senior Russian officer to 

See RUSSIA, Page 8 


CIA: Looking for a Mission 

Under Heavy Criticism , Agency Seeks 
A Director, and a Post- Cold War Role 


By Stephen Engelberg 

Xew York Tuna Savor 

WASHINGTON — With his resigna- 
tion as director of central intelligence, R. 
Junes Woobey Jr. leaves an agency under 
siege and still trying to articulate a new 
mission for the post-Cold War era. 

Not since the 1970s has the CIA come 
under such sustained and varied criticism, 
both for its narrow vision and inbred cui- 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

ture. And not since those days of congres- 
sional inquiries and revelations of coups, 
plots ana assassinations has the agency 
appeared to have so few friends in the 
Washington establishment. 

While the agency's defenders insist that 
many of the criticisms axe unfair and that 
the Aldrich Hazen Ames spy case is not a 
metaphor for widespread incompetence, 
even former CIA directors are calling for 
radical changes. Just (bis year. Congress 
set up a bipartisan commission to set a 
course for the agency. 

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ivory Coast .1.120CFA Turkev.T.L 35.000 

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Lebanon ...USS 1.50 U.S. Mil. (Eur.) SI. 10 s 


A new director may well repair the agen- 
cy’s strained relations with the White 
House, Congress and the FBI. But the 
ultimate task confronting Mr. Woolsev’s 
successor — defining a role Tor the intelli- 
gence agencies in the 21st century and 
selling it to the public — will prove far 
harder to accomplish and will require ac- 
tion by the White House as well as the 
CIA. 

“This is the moment where the china has 
to be broken and every conventional as- 
sumption has to be challenged," a senior 
administration official said. "The message 
is: If you are not producing unique infor- 
mation unavailable by other means, you 
do not get the doHar." 

Over the past four years, the intelligence 
agency has notched up some notable suc- 
cesses, accurately forecasting in 1990 the 
breakup of Yugoslavia and the resulting 
civil war. 

But ils record in other areas is mixed. 
The agency raised the alarm about the 
threat of North Korea's nuclear program. 
But its analysts took a decidedly skeptical 
view of prospects for negotiating a settle- 
ment, though talks did eventually bear 
fruit. 

The agency correctly pointed out the 
growing instability in Somalia, but over- 
stated the resistance American forces 
would encounter in restoring President 
Jean-Bcrirand Aristide to power in Haiti. 
And the agency's analysts were criticized 
for passing on to Congress unsubstantiai- 

See CIA, Page 3 


The Shifting EU Leadership 

Clinton Says He’ll Pursue Re-election , ■ , „ , rp , A u , 

J Its trance s 1 urn to Assume the Helm. 

rere Democratic .setbacks m jfie. No- GemUmj HaS UM Out the CoUTSB 


WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite se- 
vere Democratic setbacks in the No- 
vember elections. President Bill Clinton 
said Thursday that he would seek re- 
election in 1996 and was not bothered 
by the prospect of fadng a challenge for 
the Democratic nomination. 

“I don’t know" if there will be a 
Democratic challenger, he said, "and 
Tm not worried about it" The president 
made his remarks in an Oval Office 
interview. 

“I intend to seek re-election," Mr. 
Clinton said, "but that is not uppermost 
in my mind.” 

U.S. and North Korea 
Set Pilot’s Release 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Unit- 
ed States and North Korea have 
reached an agreement to free the U.S. 
Army pilot held for 12 days after his 
helicopter went down over the Commu- 
nist nation, an administration official 
said. The official said Chief Warrant 
Officer Bobby Hall was to be released 
by 9 P.M. Thursday, Washington time. 
As part of the agreement, the United 
States will “just express regret" and 
work to prevent similar incidents in the 
future, the official said. 

Earlier article^ Page 8 



Book Review 

Bridge 

Crossword 

Claya/ied Advcman£ 


Pages, 
Page 5. 
Page 21. 



, KiateBB* Mqema/Rcojcn 

AFTER THE QUAKE —A wom- 
an in northern Japan moiriwg her 
way Thursday on a road damaged 
by Wednesday’s earthquake. 


" Down ” w 
6.06 •"*} 
,3833.43 ^ '3 £ 

The Dollar 

NcwYom. .Thura.eaae 

DM 1-552B 

Pound 1.5599 

Yon 99.65 


Down 

053% 

112.7* 


By Tom Buerkle 

huematienel Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — As Germany prepares to 
hand over the European Union presidency 
to France, an event that once was expected 
10 symbolizejoint Franco-German leader- 
ship instead underlines Bonn’s growing 
dominance at a time of French indecision 
over European policy, officials and ana- 
lysts say. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl has used Ger- 
many’s economic and political power over 
the past year to shape the Union's course 
for years to come. 

Even before its six-month presidency 
began, Bonn’s diplomacy sealed accords 
that will allow Sweden, Finland and Aus- 
tria to enter the Union on Jan. 1. And 
under German stewardship this fall, the 
Union set a strategy for letting as many as 
10 East European states into the dub be- 
ginning around the turn of the century. 

“Germany is dearly increasingly getting 
what it wants," said Stanley Crossick, di- 
rector of the Belmont European Policy 
Center in Brussels. 

France, meanwhile, is finding it hard to 
decide what it wants in a Umon that is 
growing rapidly beyond its control The 
most staking feature of its EU presidency, 
which begins Sunday, is a six-week, hall to 
EU ministerial meetings around France's 
two-stage presidential election in late 


whether Paris will live up to some key 
commitments. 

Those indude the scheduled March 26 
lifting of border controls with eight other 
EU countries, a step that amid dash with 
tighter French security following last 
week’s hijacking of an Air France jet by 
Islamic extremists in Algeria, and the 
start-up by June of Europol to fight inter- 
national crime, which Paris has blocked 
until now. 

French officials say the election will not 
be an obstacle and point out that Germany 
held a national ballot in the middle erf its 


an business may be held host 
tic French politics and raised 


todomes- 
ibis about 


held a national ballot in the middle erf its 
presidency. But Bonn managed to chair a 
foreign munStexs’ meeting t hat settled the 
Union's strategy toward Eastern Europe 
just 12 days before its October election. 

There is “some confusion” inside the 
government, and among the opposition 
about whether France should adopt a 
more nationalistic stance or pursue deeper 
EU integration, said Robert Touiemon, 
head erf the French Association for Euro- 
pean Union Studies in Paris. 

That confusion is more likely to persist 
now that Jaoques Delors, the outgoing 
president of the European Commission, 
has decided not to run lor the French 
presidency, which could have turned the 
election into a referendum on Europe, Mr. 
Tookmon said. 

The remaining front-runners, Gaullisi 
leader Jacques Chirac and Prime Minister 
Edouard Balladur, have sounded more 
skeptical about greater power-sharing with 

See EUROPE, Page 8 




1 iy 


\<o' 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1994 


U.S. Accuses the Serbs of More Atrocities 


By Thomas W. Lippman 

Washing ton Fob Service 

WASHINGTON — The Stale De- 
partment Has accused Bosnian Serbian 
forces of a new round of atrocities and 
announced that the United States has 
contributed S13 mflfion in cash and ser- 
vices to the war-crimes tribunal in The 
Hague established by the United Na- 

U< Accusmg the Serbian militias of rape, 
robbery, subjecting non-Serbs to forced 
marches and forcing prisoners into labor 
camps, the State Department spokes- 
man; Mike McCuny, said Wednesday: 
“These crimes did not arise spontaneous- 


Largefy at U-S. insistence, the UN 
Security Council created the tribunal, 
the first international attempt to prose- 
cute individuals for wartime atrocities 
since the trials in Germany and Japan 


before the war, lived throughout the ter- 
ritory now held by the Bosnian Serbs.” 
He said "the latest round in this cam- 
paign of ethnic cleansing, begun last 
summer, has accelerated in recent 


after World War IL The chief proseal- months," especially in the communities 
tor, Richar d Goldstone of South Africa, of Bijcljina in the northeast, Banja Luka 


tor, Richard Goldstone of South Africa, 
recently obtained iris first indictment 
and is actively pursuing others, U.S. offi- 
cials said. 

The tribunal does not have custody of 
any suspects and may never have custo- 
dy, an administration official acknowl- 
edged. But the purpose of the indictment 
exercise is to get the names and the deeds 
into the historical record to show partici- 


ly or by hap penstan ce. Unless those re- pants in future conflicts that the interna' 
roonsible are held accountable, there can hemal community will not accept such 
beno lasting peace and reconciliation in conduct. 

B ^eestablishment of an international Citing UN estimates, Mr. McCuny 
IriKiinfll tn imth^r and tmblicize evidence said Bosnian Serbian forces have ex- 


tribunal to gather and publicize evidence said Bosman Serbian forces nave ex- 
alleged war criminals has long peUed, lolled or imprisoned over 90 per- 
bcen^cOTnc^one of U.S. policy . Eem of the 1.730, 000 nofl-Scrbs »io, 


in the northwest, and Rogatica, near the 
Gorazde enclave. 

“Brutal and heinous methods have 
been employed to force the Muslim pop- 
ulation from their homes,” Mr. 
McCurry’s statement said. “There have 
been numerous incidents of Bosnian 
Serbs bursting into Muslim homes at 
night to evict, rob, and rape the resi- 
dents." 

“Women, children and elderly people 
have been forced to flee during such 
evictions, regardless of their health or 
physical condition.” he continued. “Men 
of military age have been taken prisoner 
and made to perform forced labor in 
detention camps and on the front lines.” 





feten RajUcM*cncc Frxax-ProK 

A Polish UN soldier guarding a checkpoint Thursday at Kariovac, Croatia, where 1,000 Maritas have taken refuge. 

Hopes for Truce by Weekend in Bosnia 


Reuters 

PALE, Bosnia-Herzegovina — Bosnian 
Serbian and United Nations military 
commanders wound up talks on a pro- 
posed four-month cease-fire without sign- 
ing a truce document, but indicated that 
they still hoped to do so by the weekend. 

Earlier, the Bosnian Serbian leader, 
Radovan Karadzic, said that agreement 
was dose and that the Serbs might sign 
the cease-tire with the Muslim-led Bosni- 
an government during the course of the 
day. 

The UN commander in Bosnia, Lieu- 
tenant-General Michael Rose, said be- 
fore he left Pale, the Bosnian Serbian 


“Today it might be a little too soon 
because we were not expecting it before 
Jan. 1, and we still have two days to go," 
he said. 

General Rose added: “There are no 
main problems. There are details we are 
discussing, winch I wouldn't go into.” 
The Bosnian Serbian military com- 
mander, General Ratko Mladic, added: 
T agree with what General Rose has just 
said. I hope the parties to the conflict will 
sort the details out” 

A cease-tire brokered by former Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carter has been in force in 
Bosnia since Dec. 24. 


along front lines, to be completed by Jan. 

The Muslim-led Bosnian government, 
however, has warned that it will not 
agree to the four-month cease-tire if 
Serbs keep attacking around the north- 
western Bihac enclave. The United Na- 
tions said Serbs were righting there on 
Thursday. 

“There is fighting going on around 
Bosanska Krupa” — on the edge of the 
enclave — “with tanks, artillery and 
mortars," a UN spokesman, Edward Jo- 
seph, said by telephone from the enclave. 
“The tanks for sure would be the Bosni- 
an Serbs." 

General Rose visited Bihac on 


fore he left Pale, the Bosnian Serbian It is intended to allow time for negoti- an Serbs. 

political headquarters just outside Sara- ations on a more comprehensive four- General Rose visited Bihac on 
tevo “I hone we are eoinft to Ret some month cease-fire, under which UN Wednesday to try to halt fig ht ing in the 
Surion % thcwSd.” peacekeeping troops would be stationed area. 


2 French Tankers 

Refuse to Dock at 
Ports in Algeria 


WORLD BRIEFS 

UN Observer Is Shot at Iraqi Border 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dopgsehe 

PARIS — The crews of two 
French fuel tankers sailing to 
Algeria refused to put into port 
Thursday because of concerns 
about security and both vessels 
turned back to France, mari- 
time sources said. 

The crews of the Tellier, 
bound for Skidda, and the Des- 
cartes, headed for Arzew, voted 
not to dock in Algeria. 

“We agree with the crews 
that we would like to see the 
government explain to us what 
security measures are bring tak- 
en," said a spokesman for Com- 
pagnie Gfcnerale Maritime, 
owners of the Tellier. The ship 
has a crew of 29. 

France has banned its air- 
lines and shipping firms from 
taking passengers to Algeria 
until new security guidelines are 
in place following the hijacking 
of an Air France jet by Islamic 
fundamentalists in Algiers. 

The authorities initially also 
banned freight shipments to Al- 
geria by French air and sea car- 
riers but the ban was lifted after 
24 hours. 

In London, the War Risks 
Rating Committee, a panel of 
insurers, was considering put- 
ting Algeria on a list of coun- 
tries with risks that could raise 
premiums for shipments to the 
country. A decision was expect- 
ed early next year. 

French police commandos 
freed the airliner's passengers 
on Monday and killed all four 


KUWAIT (AFF) — A UN military observer was shot and 
r • wounded Thursday on the Iraqi-Kuwaiti border, the official 

Vy/>T*I/I Kuwaiti press agency, KUNA, reported. , ' 

%AAf Yxvanov Danot, a 32-yeaiK^d Romanjaa, was hrt/m toetiugfi. 

™ The agency gave no further details, and members of the United 

Algerian guerrillas in a raid on Nations Iraq-Kuwait Observation Mission were not r tn m edia t dy 
the plane at Marseille airport, available for comment. 

The guerrillas had killed three in August, a Bangladeshi soldier was shot and killed and two 
of the passengers. others were wounded on the Iraqi side of the demilitarized border 

France is a major trading zone. Iraq Warned smugglers for the incident, 
partner of Algeria, a fonrar _ n T . n r - tt wr 1 > 




people are trapped in crowded guaranteed that China would prevent a mass influx of Chinese 
waiting rooms in Marseille regains sovereignty over toe territory 

waiting for ships across the m 1997, Hong Kong press reports said Thursday. 

Mediterranean. According to the reports, the deputy minister of public security, 

French authorities on Thurs- Tian Qiyu, said China would begin a publicity campaign to make 
day identified another of the to- to it would not be possible for Chinese to simply walk 
four hijackers. He was identi- across the border To Hong Kong. . ... . ' 

fled as Makhlouf Benguettaf, a The reports said he made the remarks m Beging to a Hong 
25-year-old bom in B Harrach. Kong legislator. Tam Yiu-chung, who is visiting China with a; 
Algeria, a source said, delegation from the Democratic Alhanas for -the j Betterment of - 

that Algerian officials had iden- Hong Kong, a pro-Beying party m this British colony. 

According*!^ au- Death Toll in U.K. Storms Rises to 9 

than ties, Mr. Benguettaf was LONDON (AFF) — The death toll from stoops, battering 
not a previously known mem- Rritam rose to nine Thursday after 48 boms of torrential rains and 
her of the Armed Islamic winds in some regions, rescue services said. . ' 

Group^the hard-line orgamza- Qn ^ south coast of E ngland , near Poole, a cyclist was killed 
bon responsible for the Airbus g^gj- a cnis t of wind blew him off his bicycle; and near the • 
hgackmg, the French source nor thwcstern city of Manchester a canoeist drowned in a river 
t . sweUed by floods. Two people died near Oxford in road accidents 

On Monday, the Algerian m- caused by heavy downpours, 
tenor minister named the head pra people died Wednesday in Northern Ireland when their 

?u? e ,, f< ^ I ?? n ®f k i tcamaS xnotoib^bpazedtmastonnylake. , 

Abdallah Yalna, who also opex- 

!^f^Fr£^ 0 T nof Tamils Repelled in Sri Lanka Attack 

Algerian security officials COLOMBO (AFP) — Tamil rebels Thursday mounted an 
said Thursday that their troops unsuccessful bid to overrun an army camp in eastern Sri Lanka, 
had killed 61 armed Islamic insing at least 1 1 men in an assault that dealt a further blow to 
fundamentalists in the past five government efforts to resume peace talks, officials said, 
days. On Nov. 5, security offi- Dozens of heavily aimed guerrillas of the Liberation Tigers of 
rials said 84 fundamentalist Tamil Priam pitpHrc d Thamparavil camp in the coastal district of 
fighters had been killed in Batticaloa, but troops repelled the predawn strike and inflicted 
dashes with the army. heavy casualties, die spokesman said. 

(Reuters, AFP, AP), A mili tary spokesman said that 11 bodies of guerrillas had been 

recovered, but their casualties were believed “to' be much higher” 
The spokesman said seven government soldiers were wounded. 





54 Die as Jet Crashes Iberia Truce Holding, Officials Say 

MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) — Military officials said Thursc 
t />| m nra i that a cease-fire appeared to beholding across Liberia, despite : 

|y| StnfJJl in I l irk PV workers’ reports of fighting in the southeastern and central pa 

eJ Threw hattles anrv-ared tn have ended before the truce cai 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ANKARA — Fifty-four peo- 
ple were killed Thursday when 
a Turkish Airlines plane 
crashed in a snowstorm while 
trying to land in eastern Tur- 
key, officials said. 

Turkish Airlines said the 
Boeing 737 aircraft was carry- 
ing 69 passengers and 7 crew 
members on a flight from An- 
kara to the eastern city of Van 
when it crashed in a blizzard. 
All were believed to be Turkish. 

Turkish television said the 
plane crashed after two at- 
tempts to land had been abort- 
ed. 

“There arc 53 dead and 23 
injured — all the people aboard 
have now been accounted for," 
Mural Ozkan, Van's deputy 
governor, said by telephone. 

Turkish television said later 
that one of the injured had died, 
bringing the death toll to 54. 

Flights to Van are often can- 
celed in winter because of bad 
weather and poor visibility, pi- 


China Clears Regulations on Treatment of Prisoners 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BEUING — China’s top leg- 
islative body on Thursday ap- 
proved the country’s first law 
governing the running of its 
prison system, which human- 
rights groups assert is notorious 
for torture, forced labor and 
other forms of inmate abuse. 

The National People’s Con- 
gress passed the law, part of the 
government’s attempt to rein in 
rising crime, at a standing-com- 
mittee session that closed 
Thursday, the Xinhua news 
agency reported. It takes effect 
immediately. 

While the full text of the law 
has yet to be published, Xinhua 
said it set “explicit standards” 
for the police in charge of pris- 
on affairs and “rigorously pro- 
hibits maltreatment and forced 
confessions.” 


The new law also is intended 
to protea “prisoners’ legitimate 
rights to safety, property, de- 
fense, appeal and accusation,” 
Xinhua said 

The main aim of the seven- 
chapter law is to “correctly 
mete out penalties, punish and 
reform criminals, and prevent 
and reduce crimes," the agency 
said. 

Prisoners should be required 
to work as part of their rehabili- 
tation but also should enjoy 
education opportunities, the re- 
port said 

“Chinese prisons should ad- 
here to the principle of combin- 


perform. Reports that prisoners 
work long hours making prod- 


The official media has recent- 
ly highlighted several cases of 


sions from prisoners or with- 
holding their property or 


roperty, de- ucts for export have become a prison employees accepting mistreating them in other ways, 
accusation,” human-rights concern in the bribes to release inmates who The law follows regulations 
West in recent years. have yet to serve their full sen- guaranteeing prisoners’ rights 

if the seven- The law also allows for crimi- tences. circulated internally by the 

3 “correctly ^ 01 disciplinary sanctions to The news agency earlier bad Ministry of Public Security in 

, punish and ^ taken prison police reported that a draft version of 1982, said Robin Munro of Hu- 

and prevent told guilty of such “improper the bill ready for passage also man Rights Watch/Asia in 

" the agency practices” as releasing prisoners banned the police from extort- New York. 

without authorization. ing money or forcing conies- (AFP. AP) 


practices" as releasing prisoners 
without authorization. 


Bangladesh Chief Offers Foes a Deal 


Chinese prisons should ad- Coined by Our Staff Fnm Dupatdtes would head an interim govern- 

here to die principle of combin- DHAKA, Bangladesh — The menL 

ing punishment . with rehabflita- prime minister offered Thurs- she appealed to opponents 
Uadded 6(1110411011 wuh labor ’ "gg 1 . whe^rerigned from Moment 


n enarge or pns- “ tions in 1996 to break a political on Wednesday to return, say- 

“rigorously pro- The Xinhua statement did deadlock that has brought mg ; believe the opposition 
mem and Forced not spell out what kind of labor strikes and a mass resignation .i—. 


Eri. 1911 -MBS 

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not spell out what kind of labor strikes and a mass resignation 
prisoners should be required to from Parliament by the opposi- 

tion. 

Khali da Zia said her govern- 
meat would step down 30 days 
.TLsJt before elections due in early 

/-yOfttr jowa 1996 to meet an opposition de- 

n ^ D rxi ci mnpc AM f °f a caretaker adminis- 

[L BAR IN EUROPE m 1 tration to ensure fair ejections. 

"Sank roo doe nao at She said power would be 

eDaunou handed over to Preadent Ab- 

rlotd Esplanade /^r dur Rahman Biswas, who be- 

Bkichenhof /g longs to her governing Bangla- 

mammmmmamarnmmm desh Nationalist Party. He 


would head an interim govern- staged 37 days of general strikes 
menL in the impoverished country 

She appealed to opponents since 1991 aimed at ousting the 
who resigned from Parti anient prime minister, 
on Wednesday to return, say- The opposition had said that 
ing: “I believe the opposition w as prepared to let Begum 
wRl realize what they have done Zia rule until three months be- 


was wrong and harmful to the 
country" 


fore the elections in 1996 and 
that she should then make way 


sxsrssris 


calling for Begum Zia, who 
came to power in 1991, to resign 
immediately to make way for 
elections. 

An eight-hour strike on 
Thursday virtually shut down 
the country, stopping transpor- 
tation and disrupting trade and 
commerce. The opposition has 


lots told the Anatolian News 
Agency. 

Televirion pictures showed 
the aircraft npped apart and 
lines of bodies half-buried in 
the snow. Rescue teams 
combed through the wreckage 
under faint flashlight beams. 

Die tail section of the airlin- 
er, where the survivors were 
said to have been seated, was 
intacL 

Most of the passengers were 
members of the Turkish securi- 
ty forces based in the southeast- 
ern region, where the army is 
fighting Kurdish rebels. 

Military personnel are under 
stria orders to avoid traveling 
by road in the region because 
Kurdish guerrillas often taiga 
passenger buses in search of se- 
curity officials. 

Mr. Ozkan said the aircraft 
had split into three pieces after 
hitting a hill about 10 kilome- 
ters (6 miles) from Van and 4 
kilometers from the airport. 

(Reuters, AFP, AP) 


Beijing Denies 
It Is Developing 
Jet With Israel 

a w TRAVEL UPDATE 

BEUING — China denied — 

Thursday that it was building a 

American and United Join Fare Cuts 

“There is no such thing," a HOUSTON (Combined Dispatches) — American Airlines and 

Foreign Ministry spokesman United Airlines said Thursday that they would match fare cuts 
said. “The Los Angeles Times offered by Continental Airlines. 

report is groundless." Continental had said it would offer discounts of up to 40 

The Los Angeles Times, in an ‘HP 5 wthin the United State and stiwowL Foreign 

ankle carried m Thursday’s In- J&ZJPTSL fh *f£ lVb 3 IL ’ ^°? don ’ Paris - 

temationaJ Herald Tribune, re- M ^ dnd * K kets J* «« «« Jan. 13. The 

ported that China and Israel dircounted wtii apply for travel betwem Jan. 5 and May 23. 

had already produced a proto- routes, where the sale will be in effect only until 

Stbt prod^OT^mll^Sn . United it would match Continental’s discounts for both 
soon at a plant in Chengdu, and international travel; American said it would match 

capital of southwest China's Si- disco ^ ts ’ a spokesman said he did not yet know if 

chuan Province. ^ camer would ““tab the international discounts. 

The report was based on in- . , , . (AP, Bloomberg) 

formation from U.S. govern- a jiowu^ rat population and poor garbage collection have 
meat experts on the Chinese fused bubomc plague to spread through Peru, where more than 
military. It said the plane was t/i . wcrc ^ported this year with at least 33 deaths, the 
comparable 10 an America, F- H«1U, Ministry sad. (AFf) 

16 and would include extensive , Sabena said Thursday it would operate three daily services 
U.S. technology. between Brussels and Paris-Orly starting Jan 15. (AFX) 

But the report also quoted a Tbe German railroad Deutsche Balm said prices would be raised 

vice president of Israeli Aircraft Feb. 1. In Western Germany, they will increase 1 pfennie to 25 
Industries International and an pfennig (16 cents) per kilometer, and in the East, ffieywSf eo ud 
official at the Israeli Embassy 32 pfennig to 20 per kilometer. (Knight Ridder ) 

in Washington as denying that Bdgjan buck drivers heW 19 traffic Thursday in sevwalsbuih 

they were transferring U.S. cm Belgian cities, including Mons and Utee, as tS^S^ 

technology to China. nmtKt nvex a kialinrav tm wcemong 


MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) — Military officials said Thursday 
that a cease-fire appeared to beholding across Liberia, despite aid 
workers* reports of fighting in the southeastern and central parts 
of tbe country. 

Those battles appeared to have ended before the truce came 
into effect at the ead of the day Wednesday, according to 
Brigadier General Gabriel Anyankpele, chief of the African 
peacekeeping force in Liberia. “Up. to this afternoon it was 
holding," he said of die cease-fire, winch is part of an accord 
signed last week by Liberian warlords. 

As an incentive to rebels to disarm, the United Nations observe 
er missi on in Liberia has offered fighters almost six times as much 
money as during an earlier disarmament attempt in March. But 
there are concerns that the seven faction leaders will again 
squabble over tbe makeup of an interim government 


Arab Leaders Make an Appeal to Iraq 

ALEXANDRIA, Egypt (AP) — The leaders of Egypt, SyriiV 
and Saudi Arabia ended two days of talks Thursday with criticism 
of Israel and appeals to Iraq to implement all UN resolutions 
related to the 1991 Gulf War. . 

The meeting was seen as a move to bring at least seme measure of 
unity to an Arab world divided over making peace with Israel and 
by quarrels dragging on from the war. The statement on Iraq 
seemed to be a softeiing of the mainstream Arab position; same 
Arab leaders had hinted that Iraq would not be welcomed back as a 
partner until President Saddam Hussein was removed from power. 

In a communique Presidents Hosni Mubarak of Egypt, Hafez 
Assad of Syria and King Fahd of Saudi Arabia stressed support 
fm- Syria’s stand that brad must withdraw from all occupied Arab* 
territory to achieve peace. 


For the Record 


Suspected Mitsfiai extremists shot and IdUed three 
Thursday in southern Egypt, a day after the police killed seven 
radicals in raids on their hideouts in the area. (AP) 

Two dotdde-dedtel»esooffided Thursday in London, sending 
14 people to a hospital. Rescuers had to free several people 
tramped in the buses after the accident, which occurred near 
Trafalgar Square. (API 


for her immediate departure. ib Mowouia in< 

The main opposition leader,. U.S. technology. 

Hasina Wazed of the Awami But the report 
League, tokl a news conference vice president of 
that she now wanted the presi- Industries Intern 
dent to dissolve Parliament bn- official at the Is 
mediately to prepare for early in Washington a 
elections. they were transferring U.S. 

(Reuters, AFP) technology to China. 




ia * 


te -*;s3 ie 


®\1C0: n 




protest over a highway tax continued. 


(Reuters) 


Universal 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1994 


THE AMERICAS/ 


Republicans Seek Child Disability Shift 


By Robert Pear 




A'fH' York Tunes Soviet 


WASHINGTON — House Republi- 
cans are drafting legislation that would 
abolish federal cash payments for 547,000 
poor children who are severely disabled. 
They would replace the payments with 
vouchers that could be spent on a more 
limited program of medical care. 

The lawmakers said the proposal was 
part of the Republicans’ overall effort to 
redesign the nation’s welfare system and 
control costs. It would fundamentally alter 
the program, Supplemental Security In- 
come for children, which provides' cash 
grants of up to $446 a month for children 
with chronic illnesses and disabilities like 
mental retardation, cerebral palsy and 
spina bifida. 


Administration officials said Wednes- 
day that they were willing to consider the 
Republican proposal and would be inter- 
«ted in making changes in the program as 
long as those changes helped disabled chil- 
dren become productive, working mem- 
bers of society. 

Republicans express many concerns 


of caring for these children at home. They 
say, too. that many items and services 


purchased under the program would not 
be covered by the proposed vouchers, 
which could only be used for medical ex- 
penses and equipment. 

Under current law. Supplemental Secu- 
rity Income payments may be used for 
food, shelter, clothing and a wide range of 
medical and social services. 


about the current program. They note that 
the number of children receiving disability 
benefits has soared, to 847,001) this year 
from 296,000 in 1989, and that the annual 
cost has tripled, to $4.4 billion. They con- 
tend that benefits are paid to children with 
common behavior problems and that some 
parents coach children to fake disabilities. 


For example, the money can be used to 
re specially trained child-care workers or 


hire specially trained child-care workers or 
to purchase diapers so an incontinent child 
can attend school. Parents are supposed to 
report annually how the money is used. 


But advocacy groups and parents of 
disabled children say the program enables 
them to cope with the extraordinary costs 


The paren ts say the program is economi- 
1 because it is far more expensive to care 


cal because it is far more expensive to care 
for disabled children in institutions rather 
than at home. They say abuses have been 
exaggerated. 


+ POLITICAL NOTES + 


Fellow Inmates Win 


Clinton Lawyers Aim to Delay Depositions 


WASHINGTON — President Bill Clinton's lawyers said 
Thursday that they were happy with a U.S District Court 
decision to postpone a sexual harassment trial until the 
president has left office but that ihe\ probably would appeal 
one aspect to prevent pretrial fact -finding. 

Mr. ^Clinton's lawyers had sought at" least to delay the 
lawsuit brought by Pau|a Corbin Jones, saving a trial would 
interfere with his ability to carry' out the duties of the 
presidency. Ms. Jones says that Mr. Clinton propositioned 
her in a Little Rock hotel room in May 1991 when he was 
governor of Arkansas and she was a state employee. 

In her ruling Wednesday. Judge Susan Webber Wright said 
that the parties to the lawsuit could go ahead with pretrial 
"discovery" work, including questioning the president. 

Ms. Jones's lawyers responded by saying they would soon 
begin an “exhaustive" program of taking” depositions from 
Mr. Clinton and other witnesses. This is exactly what the 
president's lawyers hope to avoid. t Reuters > 


Some Simpson Perks 


Surviving House Liberals Not So Liberal 


WASHINGTON — Because so many moderate Demo- 
cratic members of the House of Representatives were wiped 
out in the Republicans' midterm election deluge last month, 
most political analysts have assumed that the Democratic 
contingent in the new 104th Congress would be not only be 
smaller — by about 50 seats — but also more liberal. 

Not so. according to Americans for Democratic Action, 
which bills itself as "the nation's premier liberal organiza- 
tion." Its average rating for Democrats in the 103d Congress. 


based on whether they voted the way the group wanted them 
to on 20 kev bills, was 75 percent in the first session and 7G 


to on 20 key bills, was 75 percent in the first session and 7G 
percent in the second. But the average score for the 197 
returning members is only 68 percent i LA T) 


La Anuria Time* Service 

LOS ANGELES I — Los .An- 
geles County Sheriff Sherman 
Block, moving to counter the 
perception that O. J. Simpson is 
getting special treatment in jail, 
said that the football hero's case 
had prompted the department 
to liberalize its rules to allow 
hot meals for other inmates in 
long court trials. 

Mr. Block also revealed that 
Superior Court Judge Lance A. 
I to, in a court order delivered 
late last week, has moved to 
curb what has been a persistent 
point of contention between the 
sheriff s office and Mr. Simp- 
son's defense team — unlimited 
visitation privileges for friends 
and family members of the for- 
mer athlete who are included on 
a list of 52 "material witnesses'* 
in his double homicide case. 

The list is the longest in re- 
cent memory, and Mr. Block 
has contended it is part of a 
defense plan to circumvent jail 
policy by allowing visits in the 
attorney's room at hours not 
available to other inmates. 
Judge Ito’s recent order cuts 


Mr. Block repeated his con- 
tention Lhat "alleged special 
treatment” for Mr. Simpson 
was intended to facilitate oper- 
ations at the jail. 

"I think it's very important 
that everyone understands that 
an individual's status outside of 
the jail does not entitle them to 
any special treatment when 
they become a resident inside 
the jail,” the sheriff said. 





Tannin Mjiu> Thr ^vmjtcd Prcv. 


A gardener t rimming the hedge at Mr. King's birthplace, part of a memorial site and now the center of a dispute. 


Rift Over King Memorial Simmers On 


"If you come from a mansion 


in Brentwood, Jiving in a 7-by- 
9-fool cell 1 imagine would be 


9-fool cell 1 imagine would be 
horrendous," he added. 

Mr. Block said Mr. Simp- 
son's stay at the jail had 
prompted some recent changes 
in policy, giving other inmates 
privileges that Mr. Simpson's 
attorneys needed a court order 
to obtain. 


New York Tima Service 

ATLANTA — The tomb and birth- 
place of the Reverend Martin Luther 
King Jr., the most popular tourist attrac- 
tion in Atlanta, may be visible only from 
a distance if a long-running feud be- 
tween the National Park Service and the 


King family is not resolved. 
After a 14-year partnership 


In one Simpson-inspired 
change, Mr. Block said, all pris- 


oners involved in a trial for 
three weeks or longer are now 
entitled to a warm meal when 
they return to their cells too late 
for dinner. 


After a 14-year partnership designed 
to share Mr. King's legacy through guid- 
ed tours, the family has ordered the Park 
Sendee off the property, and has no plan 
of its own, so far, to give guided tours. 

"You are to remove all Park Services 
personnel and property by the dose of 
business Dec. 28, 1994," wrote Sonny 
Walker, executive director of the Martin 
Luther King Center for Nonviolent So- 
cial Change, in a letter to the Park Ser- 
vice. 


Under these arrangements, people 
who want to see one of the shrines to the 
civil rights movement can still walk with 
park rangers past the King birthplace 
and tomb on historic Auburn Avenue, 
bat they will not be allowed into the 
bouse or tomb area. 

The ultimatum is the latest develop- 
ment in a dispute over the Park Service's 
plan to build an $11.8 million visitors’ 
center in honor of Mr. King across the 
street from the King Center. The visitors' 
center, on land owned by the Park Ser- 
vice, is expected to be in place by the 
start of the 1996 Summer Olympics. 

The King family has opposed the visi- 
tors* center because it wants to build a 
m u l timedia museum to Mr. King on the 
same site. 

A spokeswoman for the King Center 


said the King family is most upset that 
the Park Service did not include it in 
plans for the visitors’ center. The family 
feels it is being squeezed out of planning 
for the five-block-long Martin Luther 
King National Historic Site, she said. 

Representative John R. Lewis, Demo- 
crat of Georgia, said be planned to hold a 
Jan. 7 meeting in Atlanta to try and 
resolve the dispute. 

In the meantime, unless an agreement 
can be worked out. visitors to the King 
birthplace and tomb mil not be able to 
put their hands on history. Instead, they 
will get only a glimpse of the site and a 
prepared speech from tour guides. 


More than 3 million people a year visit 
the King Center, whicn includes Eben- 


ezer Baptist Church, where Mr. King and 
his father were pastors. 


Maryland Loser Takes Outcome to Court 


Er-pi Syr.- 
V-ZStta* 
N 


"I'-T T.y 
i.iLsauc 
rrr. s te; 

-airisi: 

:fr:=K=r 

=r.?:Hk 


WASHINGTON — With three weeks until the scheduled 
inauguration of Parris N. Glendening as Maryland’s next 
governor, the Republican he defeated, Ellen R. Sauerbrey. is 
doing what she can to keep him from being sworn in. 

Saying that voter fraud and technical improprieties were 
responsible for her losing to the Democrat by 5.993 votes, 
Mrs. Sauerbrey has sued Mr. Glendening; his running mate, 
Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, and state election officials. 
She is asking the state court to either declare her the winner 
-a 7 new election. 1 ■' ’• 
i! A trial is scheduled for Jan. 9. ■ 

Mrs. Sauerbrey said that an investigation by her campaign 

organization bad “brought into serious question” the legality 
of more titan 1 1,000 ballots — out of more than 1.4 million 
cast — including 4,774 that she contended were cast in the 
name of people in prison on Election Day. 

A lawyer for Mr. Glendening said his client would ask the 
court to dismiss the suit or rule against it outright. ( NYT ) 


Quote/ U nquote 




! r PIUTE 


Raymond Smock, a University of Maryland professor and 
official historian of the House of Representatives, after the 
Republican leadership decided to abolish his office; "I am 
very disappointed that the Republican transition team has 
seea fit to end our 1 1 years of servioe to the House, the public 
and the press. Preserving the history of the House of Repre- 
sentatives is not a luxury; it is an important and necessary 
component of the information the public needs to understand 
this vital institution.” (API 


back Mr. Simpson's private vis- 
its on weekends, the sheriff 
said. 

Mr. Block’s comments were 
in response to growing criticism 
that Mr. Simpson is getting spe- 
cial treatment at the Los Ange- 
les County Men’s Central Jail, 
where the 47-year-old former 
football star and actor has been 
incarcerated since he was 
charged with the June 12 mur- 
ders of his former wife Nicole 
Brown Simpson and her friend 
Ronald Lyle Goldman. Mr. 
Simpson has pleaded not guilty. 

The sheriff defended his deci- 
sion — based on medical advice 
— to give Mr. Simpson 10 extra 
hours of time outside his high- 
security cell each week to 
stretch his legs. He said he was 
following a medical directive by 
his staff based on an unspeci- 
fied ailment suffered by the 
county's most famous prisoner. 

Other high-security inmates 
are allowed only a half hour 
every other day outside their 
cells, in addition to two or three 
hours of recreation time on the 
jadhouse roof . 


For Visiting Blacks, a Painful Walk in Africa’s Past 


By Howard W. French 

New York Tune Service 

CAPE COAST, Ghana — By the 
time she reached the top of the cobble- 
stone ramp leading out of the dungeon 
that was a door of no return for her 
ancestors, Doris Jenkins had to prop 
herself up against the whitewashed 
walls of this town’s old slaving fort to 
collect herself. 

It was the same for scores of other 
black visitors from America and Eu- 
rope as for Ms. Jenkins, a teacher 
from Boston. 

The pilgrimage to the place known 
as the Castle, one of the many Europe- 
an slave-trading centers strung along 
Ghana's 270-mile (435-kilometer) 
coast, turned into the central event in 
a weddong festival of African culture 
put on by Ghana's government 

"I feel a chill when I think of the 
cruelty lhat drove this business, the 
heartlessness," said Ms. Jenkins, 51. 
echoing the comments of one visitor 
after another who filed through the 
unrated stone fortress of the slave 


trade that thrived on this coast for 
nearly four centuries. 

Gatherings like this in Africa have 
often tended to confine themselves to 
ind* 1 ents of Europe, whose giant 
tra - companies carried more than 
650,000 Africans, into slavery from 
this '•^ miry’s coastline in the ISth 
century alone. 

But at this often-tearful homecom- 
ing, Africans and African-Americans 
alike engaged in an unusually open 
process of soul-searching over the role 
of Africans in a process that caused so 
much suffering. 

From the Africans at this festival, 
known as Panafest, there were greet- 
ings to long-lost “brothers” that many 
American viators dearly cherished. 

There were also rebukes for the 
Americans* superficial knowledge of 
Africa and their failure to pitch in 
with wealth and expertise to help the 
continent. 

For many of the hundreds of the 
participants, though, it was finally 
time to discuss a subject that, if never 


quite taboo, has not been widely ac- 
knowledged either by Africans or 
black Americans outride of academia: 
the lucrative involvement of many Af- 
ricans themselves in helping supply 
the trans-Atlantic slave trade. 

"Until there is an admission by Af- 
ricans that they were involved in the 
slave trade, the healing process will be 
difficult to realize,” said Imakus 
Nzinga Okofo, a former New York 
City resident who has taken up resi- 
dence in Cape Coast, where she leads 
American visitors on tours of Ghana's 
slave-trading monuments. “Though 
the European was responsible, he 
could not nave done as much without 
the cooperation of Africans." 

Ghana gained independence from 
Britain in 1957, setting off a wave of 
freedom from colonialism. Since then, 
African intellectuals have focused 
most discussions of slavery on the 
damage done by foreigners to their 
cultures by the removal in bondage of 
as many as 15 million people over a 
400-year span. 


But calls like these to acknowledge 
the practices of Africans themselves in 
precolonial times have recently begun 
to resound loudly in Ghana. Africans 
took captives during uibal wars for 
use locally as servants, and later they 
took captives for sale by the millions 
to Europeans. 


In a midnight ceremony on the eve 
of Panafest, Ghanaian traditional 
chiefs sacrificed a cow before a gather- 
ing of African-American visitors in an 
act that was meant as an offering of 
atonement for the sins of their ances- 
tors. 


“I believe there is a great psychic 
shadow over Africa, and it has much 
to do with our guilt and denial of our 
role in the slave trade," said Kofi 
Awoonor, a Ghanaian writer and for- 
mer delegate to the United Nations 
who led a discussion on slavery at the 
festival. “We, too, were blameworthy 
in what was essentially one of the 
most heinous crimes in human histo- 
ry.” 


. 1 

, ;wl Jflta . JJEXJCO. chief Resign, Amid Peso Crisis Away From Politic, 


'&tr 

■- & 

. iv 




Continued from Page 1 Thursday, however, foreign 

Puche, Mr. Zedillo still faces firm 




^ the financial rating firm, 
the difficult task of restoiing a 9Q-minute international 


■;» n- 


■alimnlTiiml ; TI1 .. r .nrr' <* 7vriUUIUw UUHUttUUUUi 

• telephone conference with in- 

vestarsWedoesday afternoon. 

• ^average t ° al Caller volume was so heavy that 






drouns of tt»nomi c prospmty opera tois noeded more than 30 

!££ Shat ‘ «“* *• »»**- 
hopes an, fte (onaer 


■ . - J J?I 


dons raised tenure- 7 was 

Mr. Salinas’s chief lobbyist in 


.say.^J^^OriosSaK- 
' nas de Gortan and Mr. Serna . “5*. . 


Raymundo Riva Palario, a col- 
umnist for the Reforxna news- 
paper, in a prescient can Thurs- 
day for Mr. Serra Puche’s 
dismissal. 

Under Mr. Salinas, both Mr. 
Serra Puche and Mr. Aspe per- 
mitted Mexico's trade defiat to 
soar to its projected 1994 level 
of $28 billion — a level that Mr. 
Zedillo said was far out of pro- 
portion with the country’s gross 
domestic product. He cited this 
"excessive" current-accounts 
deficit as the chief cause of the 
peso devaluation. 

To stanch the flight of for- 


i-s ^ 0 


mg effort last year to win NAF- T ; n 


mg effort festyor to win NAF- wement, has been blasted in 

SifMSLn press and by 


apt capita) over the past week, 
Mexico doubled interest rates 


- — . •!!■*— 


: l0id 1 H M S CanS Sf S? American fa vestmen t analysis 
’ ZZSS as the instigator of the current 


wages and vast new trade op- 
' portunities, while he attracted 


economic crisis. 

"The damage that be has 


Mexico doubled interest rates 
on its 28-day Treasury bill 
Wednesday, promisng returns 
of 31 percent in hopes of luring 
bade nervous investors. Mexi- 
can officials also are working 
with the IMF to arrange an 


foreign companies here with done to lhc & the way emergeomr credit line, supple- 

promises of cheap labor, low . manaRed the peso devalua- mentmg $7 biffion in credit of- 
inflation and lngh yield on in- g hrannaoui; 1 wrote fered last Thursday, 
vestments. 


• The Canadian Health Ministry is to investigate how the 
computerized medical histories of thousands of patients in the 
Vancouver area, stored on at least 20 floppy disks, ended up 
on sale at a discount store in Langley, British Columbia. (AP) 

• The 14 trustees of the Freedom Forum, a foundation in 

Arlington, Virginia, led by the USA Today founder, Allen H. 
Neuharth, agreed to pay the forum nearly $174,000 to settle 
allegations of improper use of the organization’s funds for 
lavish travel, custom furniture and the promotion of Mr. 
Neuharth’s autobiography. (WP) 

• An electric space heater ap pare nt ly started a fire that killed 

nine members of a Haitian family, including six young chil- 
dren, in a house in Orange, New Jersey. (AP) 

• Breezy weather scrubbed the launching near Reno, Nevada, 
of the Earthwinds Hilton balloon for a fifth attempt to make 
aviation history with a nonstop flight around the world. (AP) 

• For the fust tine, New York state accepted a computer- 

generated image of what an inmate would look like without a 
beard instead of making him shave for a conventional photo- 
graph, as is required. The inmate. Rabbi Shloroo Helbrans, 
the leader of a small Hasidic sect, has a religious belief that a 
man’s beard must not be touched. (NYT) 

• FamBy members of two of the 68 people killed in the crash 

of an American Eagle commuter plane in Indiana in October 
have filed lawsuits against the airline and the Italian-French 
consortium that made the plane. (AP) 


Naples Sees Threat to U.S . Personnel 

German Woman Arrested at Site of ’88 Terrorist Bombing 


The Associated Prea 

NAPLES — Security was 
boosted Thursday after the po- 
lice found ammunition on a 
woman photographing a U.S. 
military rite that was struck by 
terrorists in a 1988 bombing. 
Pictures of North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization officials 
and airports were discovered in 
her hotel room. 

The woman was being inves- 
tigated for possible terrorist 
links. The authorities identified 
her as Marties Walter, 47, a 
German citizen living in Nlmes, 
France. 

The police said they found 
bullets in one erf her pockets. In 
her hotel room, officials said, 
they found photographs of 
NATO officials, European poli- 
ticians and severalairports. 

Also found in the room were 


newspaper articles on the recent 
hijacking of an Air France jet- 
liner, NATO’s intervention in 
the former Yugoslavia, and pic- 
tures of Ms. Walter and other 
people dressed in camouflage 
combat clothing. 

Ms. Walter was arrested 
while taking pictures of a USO 
center, which offers recreation 


servicewoman, were killed on 
April 14, 1988, in a car bombing 
at the club. 

Junzo Okudaira, leader of the 
Japanese Red Army terrorist 
group, was sentenced in absen- 
tia to life in prison in 1992 by an 
Italian court. He remains a fugi- 
tive. 


Security was increased 


and other sendees for U.S. mill- around Naples's port and other 


tary personnel. 

Five people, including a U.S. 


areas of the city, which has a 
large U.S. military presence. 



QA? As Agency Chief Leaves, U.S. Central Intelligence Still Searches for Post-Cold War Role 


Continued from Page 1 


‘ 'ST- 


ed allegations about Mr. Aristi- 
de's mental health. 

The challenge to the CIA on 
these ' and other issues was: 


“The CIA is like a giant dog,” 
one former intelligence official 
said. “They will follow the mas- 


ter. But you’ve got to put them 
ine challenge to tfie OA on ^ ^ fcash. When you’ve got 
thae and other issues was: ^ National Security Council 
What can the agency provide ^ the president sending rig- 
that is not available from Amer- t ^ at don’t think you’re 


! 


the agency’s mission was simul- 
taneously reduced and made 
more complicated. 

The Soviet Union's nuclear 


or Iran, remain dosed sodeties, 
in which even the leaders’ most 
baric intentions are unknown. 


“simply to preserve its infra- 
structure.” 


State Department or other gov- 
ernment departments.” 

Nor, the House c ommi ttee 
charged, has the CIA tailored 1 
its espionage operations for the 


o 


AUTUMN/WINTER 

COLLECTION 


Mr. Woolsey’s supporters say 


spread over the hc made some important con- 
^ tribu lions during his two years 


Mr. Glickman, who was post-Commnnist era. The corn- 
nominated cm Wednesday as mi tree noted in June that, four 


: 


jean diplomats, foreign press re- 
ports and what intelligence offi- 
cials caD “open sources"? 

A senior administration offi- 
cial said that many policymak- 
ers take for granted the cascade 
of information from the myriad 
agencies that fall under the di- 
. rector of central intelligence. 
“No country can access infor- 
mation the way US. intelli- 
gence accesses information." he 
said. “It ain’t even dose.” 

Defenders of the agency say 
lhat while h has faults, they are 
not all of its own making 


nals that *we don’t think you’re 
important,’ they just wander 
around lost.” 

Throughout the Cold War, 

• f T A dmc 


US. military found itself em- at ^ clA, launching a new 
JSSi'niS J^ Wcrid trouble system of secret electronic sur- 
spots. like Somalia and Haiti — yeillance and reconnaissance 
places that were not vital to — 


secretary of agriculture, said in 
his speech: “Our committee 


years after the dismantling of 
the Berlin Wall, the agency was 


Qsale 


questions whether the _CIA still many steps away from re- 
needed to be writing studies of thinkin g its pl ans for recruiting 


places that were not vital to 
American security but where a 


satellites that will gather intefli- 


evangefical Protestantism in 
Latin America, AIDS, or Nor- 
wegian whaling policy — mai- 


the mission of the CIA was handful of casualties could 
dear. The Soviet Union was the transform the political equation 


gence data well mto the next ^ — 

tbtok “nks or offices within the 


“target.” Thousands of highly at home. 

trained officials pored over sat- To reduce the risk to their 


Woolsey in combative budget 
disputes with some lawmakers, 


spies. 

“Thus far, CIA plans have 
the look- of old wine in new 
bottles, albeit smaller ones," the 
committee said. 


ZD 


READY-TO-WEAR 
SELECTION OF HANDBAGS 
SHOES AND ACCESSORIES 


ellite photographs and studied 
intercepted conversations in an 
effort to measure the Soviet 
military buildup, predict the ac- 
curacy of its missiles and alert 


troops, military officers de- 
manded up-to-the-minute data 


In a speech last month at 
Georgetown University, Repre- 


on everything fromanti-aircraft sentative Dan Glickman, Dem- 
misriles in Bosnia to the array ocrat of Kansas, the former 
of forces in Somalia. While chairman of the House InteZIi- 


policymakere to other potential 
flashpoints. 


ask the butler... 


jsh points. 

With the fall of communism. 


some of the countries, like Bos- gence Committee, said that af- 
nia, are relatively open to West- ter the fall of the Berlin Wall the 
cmers, others, like North Korea agency rushed io do any task 


vim Iiraruv il ft. ■><•! if I# If 


■f 


o 


PARIS 

2 FG. SAINT HONORE 


*- .'TKm«ii j 


I 







page 4 


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1994 

opinion 


Ucralh 


international 



Wr ihune Two Tracks for NATO Toward Central Europe and Russia 

_ __ _ . _ . , . Talk of a “new nism for consultation within i 


; n.n* 1 '* 

i'i‘ ; ,, - 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AT© THE WASHINGTON POST 


Russians and Chechens 


Just one day after Boris Yeltsin pro- 
mised to stop bombing civilians in rebel 
Chechnya, he resumed bombing civilians. 
He had offered “peace talks,” meaning 
that the Chechens could talk about a 
cease-fire, their own disarmament and 
the replacement of their leader, Dzbokar 
Dudayev. The Chechens rejected these 
transparently one-sided terms, insisting 
on adding the dement of Russian mili- 
tary withdrawal. This was too much for 
President Yeltsin, who wants to subdue 
the Chechens, not conciliate them. What- 
ever the military results, in the broader 
political battle of Chechnya be is losing. 

Is conciliation — a political solution — 

C ible? Certainly it is harder now, after 
na. has brought massive Force to bear 
against a determined mountain people, 
than it was just two weeks ago when the 
maior assault began. But the Yeltsin lead- 


live action to — his proclaimed goal — 
maintain the unity of Russia. It would do 
belter now to show the maturity to end 
this civil war on negotiated terms. Other- 
wise Mr. Yeltsin merely advertises his 
frustration and widens the gaping divide 
that his Chechnya intervention has pro- 
duced within his own society and his own 


government and even his own military. 

The erratic style of Mr. Yeltsin's lead- 
ership in this crisis of the Russian slate is 
much noted and has taken a heavy toll on 
his personal reputation and sta n di n g. 
These things rise and fall but he could yet 
be dragged down. Still, the deeper impact 
may be on die course of democracy. Rus- 
sian democratic institutions and habits 
may not yet be strong enough to withstand 
the tremendous strains put upon them by 
the involvement in cjvTfl war and much 
else. Mr. Yeltsin may have a good law- 
yer's case for his intervention. But he 
needs to apply it with a statesman’s touch 
that has so far been grievously lacking. 

The United States formed its own na- 
tional territory sometimes by military 
means, and it fought a bloody civil war to 
preserve the integrity of the nation. It still 
leans to a policy of favoring Boris Yeltsin 
for his avowed commitment to market 
democracy. But historical understand- 
ing and friendly intent do not require 
the United Slates simply to pronounce 
Chechnya an “internaT Russian matter, 
as it has done, and let it go at that. It has 
its own interest in a Russian policy that 
looks to living with the people who are 
now a thorn in Russia’s side. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Mexico Shouldn’t Panic 


Mexico’s peso crisis has obviously shak- 
en Mexican officials and foreign investors 
alike and could damage Mexico's short- 
term economic prospects. But it does not 
reflect fundamental flaws in Mexico’s 
newly liberalized economy. Moreover, 
President Ernesto Zedillo's economic min- 
isters have responded to the challenge 
competently, avoiding premature efforts 
to peg a new exchange rate. The markets 
will eventually stabilize. On Wednesday 
the peso rebounded some IS percent. 

Devaluations inspire temporary crises 
of confidence, and this one is no excep- 
tion. It is likely to lead to slower growth, 
faster inflation and fewer imports from 
the United States. A larger gap between 
U.S. and Mexican wages could tempt 
more Mexicans to cross the border seek- 
ing work, Opponents of the North Amer- 
ican Free Trade Agreement will be 
tempted to say they told you so. 

But without NAFTA these negative 
consequences might have been even more 
pronounced. NAFTA also helped bring 
emergency financial support from the 
United States, in the form of $6 billion in 
credits aimed at shoring up investor con- 
fidence. A far larger package is now re- 
portedly being prepared. 

It is up to Mr. Zedillo, however, to 
reassure poor Mexicans that after years 
of waiting for the rewards of economic 
liberalization to trickle down, they will 
not be put off again with promises. His 
task will be all the harder because restor- 
ing confidence abroad will require a de- 
gree of budgetary austerity at home that 
could force him to defer some of his 
planned new social spending for awhile. 

But he need not retreat from his pro- 
mises to open up Mexico’s political sys- 
tem by disentangling the ruling party 
from the government and assuring more 
honest state and local elections. There 


are risks in liberalizing a semi-authori- 
tarian political system at a time of dis- 
appointment. The risks of not opening 
up would be far graver. 

Traditionally, outgoing Mexican ad- 
ministrations take responsibility for any 
devaluations during a transition period. 
But Mr. Zedillo’s predecessor, Carlos Sa- 
linas, gambled that foreign investment 
would soon recover from the slowdown 
amid last year’s political troubles and 
that no devaluation would be necessary. 
It was reasonable to bet that Mexico 
needed to woo investors with a period of 
exchange rate stability and could afford 
the cost of growing trade deficits. 

But those investors held back and Mr. 
Zedillo had little choice but to let the peso 
FaR. His finance minister has been criti- 
cized for denying the possibility of devalu- 
ation until the last moment, but that is 
s tandar d practice everywhere. Now there 
are demands that the government inter- 
vene to defend a new exchange rate, but 
that would be premature before the mar- 
ket begins to settle down on its own. 

Mr. Zedillo, who won the ruling party's 
presidential nomination only after the 
original nominee was assassinated, and 
won the presidency after the fairest vote 
count in modem Mexican history, is be- 
ing faulted in some quarters for not being 
a take-charge leader like his predecessor. 
Yet he could turn out to be the right man 
for these times. He understands the eco- 
nomic imperatives of the moment and is 
right to resist calls to defend an indefensi- 
ble fixed peso rate. 

He also seems to understand the politi- 
cal imperatives just as dearly and has 
committed his administration to long- 
overdue political reforms. He should re- 
main confident, disregard panicky advice 
and maintain his sensible course. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Change at the QA 


James Woolsey's resignation as the U.S. 
government’s intelligence chief has a bit- 
tersweet quality. By talent, disposition and 
prior service, he was unusually well 
equipped to run intelligence and, not least, 
to plan its post-Cold War future. But he 
never seemed quite to fill the large space 
that his credentials penciled in for him. 

Partly it was his manner of reserve, 
which in fact hid a core of integrity. By 
waiting for hard evidence in the explosive 
Ames investigation, for instance, rather 
than simply going ahead and lopping off 
heads, he ran afoul of a congressional 
impatience that was already budding on 
other issues, such as the inevitable rough 
and tumble of downsizing the CIA. More 
than that, he got into a surprisingly in- 
stant and public confrontation with the 
chief Senate intelligence overseer. These 
several frictions lowered the reservoir of 
congressional understanding that, had it 
been fuller, would have helped him when 
he met criticism for his light disciplining of 
the Ames case counterintelligence crew. 

But it wasn’t just that his effectiveness 
was reduced by getting crosswise from his 
Hill committees, especially on the Senate 
side. He happened to work for a presi- 
dent who was never all that much inter- 
ested in suffering intelligence briefings 
and who evidently never took to his ideas 
on intelligence reorganization. This meant 
that when Mr. Woolsey got in trouble on 
other fronts, he did not have the full squad 
of White House defenders that might oth- 
erwise have been useful to him. 


For his work nonetheless, be earned 
high marks as someone who wasn't flashy 
but did things in a solid though not a 
dominating way. His determination to 
keep up the intelligence budget brought 
him the grudging regard of bureaucratic 
rivals. He was burdened, in some respects 
unfairly, by the breaking of the case of 
Aldrich Hazen Ames, the “mole” who sold 
out American agents to Moscow. 

The next director of Central Intelli- 
gence will be able to build on work done 
by Mr. Woolsey. It must be ensured that 
counterintelligence is locked firmly into 
place in the “culture" as well as die for- 
mal procedures of the CIA. The debate — 
the struggle — over the refitting of intelli- 
gence for post-Cold War duty is far from 
complete. Bill Clinton himself will have 
to demonstrate his readiness to cultivate 
intelligence and to use it in ways consis- 
tent with the national interest. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 

Other Comment 

Th inking About Islam 

Radical Islam has reared its head over 
the Christmas holidays. The danger is to 
demonize Islam as a whole. We rightly 
object to the characterization of Western 
society as irredeemably corrupt. Bui we 
are guilty of the same sloppy thinking if we 

regard sill Muslims as fanatics, 

— The Doily Telegraph (London). 



International Herald Tribune 

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W ashington — what 
should be Europe’s and 
NATO’s relationship with Rus- 
sia? The question must be an- 
swered soon, and decisively, if 
America’s historic commitment 
to Europe is to remain intact. 

It is axiomatic that America’s 
security and Europe’s are linked. 
That means that both sides must 
define what constitutes Europe 
and what is the security perimeter 
of NATO. And it means that the 
relationship between Europe, 
Russia and America should en- 
courage the emergence of a Rus- 
sia that is both benign and dexno- 


By Zbigniew Brzezinski 


neither to render NATO 
impotent nor to 
dominate Central 
Europe again would 
have good reason to 
favor this approach. 


cratic — a prospect that is by no 
means certain. 

The a genda is as daunting as 
the one America faced in the late 
1940s. Remember that the forma- 
tion of NATO was a response not 
just to the Soviet threat but to the 
need to a ssimila te a recovering 
Germany into the European sys- 
tem. Now the enlargement of the 
European Union — favored by a 
powerful Germany — means that 
the question of expanding NATO 
must be addressed head-on. 

Failure to address this issue 
would compound the danger that 
the Atlantic alliance may disinte- 
grate — a trend that the Bosnian 
tragedy has made all too evident. 

The disgraceful indecisiveness 
of both the Bush and the Clinton 
administ rations has helped to di- 
vide NATO, pitting Britain and 
France (backed from the outside 
by Russia) against the United 
States and Germany. Bosnia rep- 
resents an immediate challenge to 
the alliance’s political cohesion. 
The absence or a long-range de- 
sign for Europe could deprive it 
of its historical reason for being. 

Although President BUI Clin- 
ton repeatedly has said that the 
issue is no longer whether NATO 
will expand but when and how, 
his administration has failed to 
project a strategic vision or a clear 
sense of direction on a matter of 
so much salience in Europe’s fu- 
ture. Expanding NATO will re- 
quire a major and consistent ef- 
fort at the presidential level and 
that effort will have to overcome 
two major obstacles: European 
timidity and Russian temerity. 

Early this month the United 
Stales prevailed on its allies to 
undertake a study of how to ex- 
pand NATO. The allies approved 
the study, but with reservations. 
Germany is divided on the pace of 
expansion; France is opposed; 
Britain is skeptical. The Russians 
simply bluster — wanting, as Pres- 
ident Boris Yeltsin recently did in 
Budapest, that NATO’s expansion 
could split Europe and reopen the 
Cold War — and then act as if 
they could veto the whole thing. 

Within 10 days of Mr. Yeltsin’s 
outburst. Vice President A1 Gore, 
who has been quite tough-minded 
on this issue, visited Moscow. 
What he said to the Russians was 
not made public, but they Jet it be 
known that they were reassured 
by his explanation: 1995 would 
be spent studying how to enlarge 
the alliance, and a derision would 
be made afterward, in close con- 


sultation with Russia. Many ob- 
servers took this to mean that the 
administration had shifted once 
again, putting NATO expansion 
on the back burner. 

This was not reassuring to the 
insecure Central Europeans. An 
issue of this magnitude is not 
something to be advanced by a 
study. It must be approached 
with a dearheaded strategy and 
political firmness. 

The Europeans will follow and 
the Russians will accommodate 
only if the United States advances 
a constructive vision in which ibe 
expansion of NATO is coupled 
with a cooperative option for Rus- 
sia — but in the context of an 
absolutely firm commitment that 
NATO will be expanded to in- 
dude the Czech Republic, Poland 
and Hungary, either in coopera- 
tion with Russia or without it. 
Hesitation, inconsistency and 
weakness will not only discredit 
American leadership but proba- 
bly doom NATO altogether. 

Russia is is the midst of a sen- 
sitive and complex national re- 
definition. Its relationship to the 
West — indeed, its very inclina- 
tion to define itself as part of the 
West — is uncertain. The void left 
by Communist ideology has not 
been filled, and there is fierce 
debate between those who want 
Russia to be a national increas- 
ingly European state and those 
who want a distinctively Eurasian 
and imperial state. 

In that sharpening debate, the 
“Wes terms ts” are certainly not 
gaining ground. Some, like For- 
eign Minister Andrei Kozyrev, 
who used to lead this camp, seem 
to be defecting. 

The most articulate and politi- 
cally appealing leaders seem to be 
those who argue that Russia is 


destined to exercise geopolitical 
sway over Eurasia, that it fc the 
embodiment of a distinctive Eur- 
asian identity and that its special 
political status must be asserted 
— directly in Eurasia and indi- 
rectly in Central Europe. 

Hie rise of this faction signals 
the urgency of defining a stable 
relationship between Europe, in- 
cluding NATO, and post-Soviet 
Russia. That definition need not 
consider now whether Russia 
might eventually become an inte- 
gral part of NATO, let alone re- 
ject that option. It is not even 
clear whether the Russians wish 
to be part of NATO. But if ex- 
cluded and rejected they will be 
resentful, and their own political 
self-definition will become more 
anti-European and anti-Western. 

The issue of Russia’s associa- 
tion with NATO should be kept 
open, depending on the speed, 
depth and breadth of the expan- 
sion of the European Union and 
of the Euro-Atlantic security sys- 
tem. The issue will have io be 
faced only when a wider NATO 
has reached the frontiers of Rus- 
sia, wTid only if Russia satisfies 
the basic criteria for membership 
by then. Neither is likely soon. 

The alliance's first step — and it 
should be taken at the earliest op- 
portunity in the new year — is to 
formally declare NATO’s criteria 
for expansion and indicate which 
countries appear to meet them. 
This would end the counterpro- 
ductive debates with Rnssia over 
whether NATO should expand. 
The longer this step is delayed, 
the more vociferous Moscow’s 
objections are likely to be. 

In advocating the expansion of 
NATO, one should note that nei- 
ther the alliance nor its prospec- 
tive new members are facing any 


imminent threat Talk of a “new 
Yalta" or a Russian mflitaiy 
threat is not justified, either by 
cncumstances or even by worst- 
case scenarios for the near future. 
So the expansion should not be 
driven by whipping up anti-Rus- 
sian hysteria that could become a 
self-fulfilling prophecy. 

Since the intent of any expan- 
sion is peaceful — at least for now 
— it need not involve deploying 
NATO troops, especially Ameri- 
cans and Germans, on the terri- 


n fom for consultation within the 
Conference on Security and Co- 
operation in Europe. 

The two-track strategy, com- 
bining the expansion of NATO 
with a new transcontinental secu- 
rity structure that embraces Rus- 
sia, would represent a productive 
response to Russia’s concerns. 

Some Russian leaders havefpn- 
vately indicated that they would 
not be averse to it, and it would 
obstructively exploit earlier Rus- 
sian ideas — notably Mr. Yeitria’s 


tory of new Central European suggestion last year Iota special 
members. Periodic joint maneu- relationship between Russia aid 

. ■ . . j . : MATO A whntt orul « 


vers, coordinated planning, posi- 
tioning of equipment and joint 
command exercises would be 
sufficient to give substance to 
NATO security guarantees. 

This should allay some of Rus- 
sia’s legitimate concerns. But not 
all of its concerns are legitimate, 
and the alliance should not shrink 
from "miring that known. 

Just five years ago, the alliance 
had. to overcome Moscow’s ob- 
jections to including the reunited 
Germany in NATO. Wisely, the 
Bush administration spurned 
those who favored acquiescence 
to the Kremlin. Equally wisely, 
Moscow gave in. Today’s cir- 
cumstances call for a similar dis- 
play of constructive firmness. 
Russia has no right to veto ex- 
pansion or to impose limits on 
the sovereignty of the Central 
European states. 

The alliance's strategy needs to 
proceed on two tracks. As it is 
laying out its plan for expansion, 
it needs to invite Russia to hdp 
create a new transcontinental sys- 
tem of collective security, one 
that goes beyond the expansion 
of NATO proper. Such a system 
would include a formal treaty of 
global security between the ex- 
panded NATO and the Russian 
Federation, and a new mecha- 


NATO. A Russia whose goal is 
neither to render NATO impotent 
nor to dominate Central Europe 
again would have good reason to 
favor this approach. 

Nearly half a century ago, the 
Soviet Union spumed participa- 


tion in the Marshall Plan and 
chose to go it alone — until it 
collapsed from historical fatigue. 
Tormented by domestfc conflict, 
troubled by the rise of the new 
Muslim states to the south and 

from** a powinful Chn^hwlL 
east, today’s Russia is In no posi- 
tion to engage in a conflict with 
the West as well 

Moscow can perhaps delay the 
enlargement of NATO, but it 
can neither halt Europe’s growth 
nor prevent the extension of the 
Euro-Atlantic security umbrella 
over the wider Europe. It can 
merely isolate itself again. The 
Kremlin leaders should realize 
this. The two-trade plan outlined 
here could help them avoid the 
basic error made by their Soviet 
predecessors. 

The writer was President Jimmy 
Carter's national security adviser. 
This comment was adapted by The 
New York Tunes from a longer 
essay in Foreign Affairs. 


Washington Is Right to Prepare Expansion of NATO 


W ASHINGTON — Extend- 
ing stability to East-Central 
Europe is the defining issue in 
European security in this decade. 
To do this, the Clinton adminis- 
tration is prodding NATO into 
the first cautious steps toward 
taking in new members. 

Opponents in Western Europe 
and Russia realize that the train is 
getting ready to leave the station, 
and they are trying to stop it. 

East-Central Europe, between 
a unified Germany and Russia, is 
once again caught in a strategic 
no-man’s- land of the type that 
has created instability in the past. 
NATO can help provide a politi- 
cal and security anchor for these 
fragile democracies so that the 
world consolidates the victory in 
the Cold War. 

Konrad Adenauer, the Federal 
Republic of Germany* first chan- 
cellor, understood how easily na- 
tionalism and bad geopolitical 
habits might be rekindled in post- 
totalitarian Germany. Thai is why 
he embraced the Atlantic alliance 
as vital, not only as a bulwark 
against outside threats but also as 
a framework that bound Germans 
firmly on a pro-Western course. 
What worked for Europe's western 
half then must now be applied to 
Europe's eastern half. 

The risks and dangers are real. 
As Chancellor Helmut Kohl often 
says, the malign am nationalism 
that has arisen in the Balkans c? n 
spread to Central Europe if the 
West does not take the right steps. 
Leaders in East-Central Europe 
agree. Thai is why they want to 
join NATO — now, before some- 
thing goes wrong in the region. 


By Ronald D. Asmus 


True, these countries are wor- 
ried about Russian power — who 
can blame them? — but they have 
an overriding interest in demo- 
cratic cooperation with Russia. 
They see NATO as a bridge 
builder, not as a way of exclud- 
ing Russia from Europe. Exclud- 
ing these countries, incidentally, 
would not help integrate Rnssia 
into Europe but would actually 


What matters is that the 
West pursue a broad, 
balanced strategy to 
expand cooperation with 
Russia in an aU- 
European context, udth 
NATO expansion as part 
ofthepackage* 


make that relationship tenser. 

NATO expansion also has a 
direct bearing on contemporary 
Germany. There is a consensus 
among Germans that their eastern 
border must not be allowed to 
become the eastern limit of Eu- 
rope or of the Atlantic community. 

An alliance that does not deal 
with Germany's most important 
national security concerns in the 
East is no alliance at alL 
Opinion polls conducted for 
the Rand Corporation show that 
Germans see Eastern Europe as 


their most important “vital inter- 
est," and that the majority sup- 
port alliance expansion. 

Defense Minis ter Volker Rflhe 
may be controversial but he has 
tabled the only credible vision for 
harmonizing Germany’s new in- 
terest in the East with those of 
Germany’s partners and allies in 
an allianc e context 

The European Union has an 
important interest in seeing 
NATO expand eastward: the si- 
multaneous extension of market 
access and security holds the 
greatest promise of stabilizing the 
region. The Union’s fature is far 
too wobbly for the West to rely 
solely on it to meet this challenge, 
and NATO should not have to 
wait on the vagaries of EU policy. 

The best policy is for rapid 
NATO membership coupled with 
improved market access, the lat- 
ter paving the way for eventual 
Union membership. By develop- 
ing both the security and tne 
economic components, the West 
would signal that expansion is 
designed to enhance stability, not 
a mflitary move to isolate Russia. 

The future UJS. role in Europe 
depends heavily on NATO ex- 
pansion. An alliance whose role is 
limited to defending West Euro- 
pean borders has no future in 
American politics. To anchor the 
United States in European securi- 
ty, the alliance must accept the 
duty of stabilizing the East, with a 
new trans-Atlantic bargain on 
how to do iL Otherwise it runs the 
risk of becoming irrelevant 

In American opinion, the status 


Next Should Come Europe’s 21st Century, Not the 19th 


P ARIS — The millennium ap- 
proaches steadily, but the 
post-Cold War world, which was 
welcomed with such relief, isn't 
sorting itself oul At this rate, the 
20th century — so often a syn- 
onym for modem, up-to-date, ad- 
vanced — will fade into the tor- 
mented past with little more than 
elaborate technology to claim as 
its achievement. 

Major improvements in the 
way nations deal with each oth- 
er, established in the heroic ef- 
fort to make over the interna- 
tional system after World War 
II, are coming into question. 
Collective security, cemented in 
NATO, European reconciliation 
and integration defined in the Eu- 
ropean Union, trade opening and 
monetary cooperation no longer 
look so solidly ensconced that 
they can still be taken for granted. 

The United Nations, unblocked 
after almost half a century of 
East-West paralysis, has again 
lost credibility. Everywhere, poli- 
ticians are talking about “reas- 
serting national interests." 

Even Secretary of State Warren 
Christopher, in a year-end review 
and forecast, expressed his “con- 
fidence" that the Clinton admin- 
istration can woik smoothly on 
foreign policy with the Republi- 
can-run Congress “if we hew to 
national interest,” as though it 
didn't really in the past two years. 

It isn't as though responsible 
authorities anywhere in the West 
were seriously challenging the 
conviction that NATO, the Eu- 
ropean Union and the other in- 
stitutions serve their nations’ in- 
terest. France has become unac- 
customedly vocal in insisting on 
the central importance of alli- 
ance guarantees, although fre- 
quently in the context of arguing 
that they should not be “diluted" 


By Flora Lewis 


by admitting states further east. 

But the definition of interest is 
narrowing, as though the old 
goals of security, democracy and 
prosperity could now be safely 
left to some vague future while 
states focus, separately, on more 
immediate economic and politi- 
cal benefits. 

In this atmosphere, the sturdy 
international monuments of the 
last half century risk being eroded 
and undermined, without anyone 
actually wanting that to happen. 

Now that it is no longer neces- 
sary to fear World War 1 1/ on the 


toward the mind-sets 
and antagonisms that 

brought World War I. 

horizon, a regression has set in 
toward the mind-sets and antago- 
nisms that brought World War I. 

Very senior officials in Paris have 

begun to talk about a “shifting — — — — „ . , , _ 

axis" in international relations. “Europe des patries.” * 8 ° formed 1944: Dutch Anta C* 1 

The new links of policy affmi- The British are pleased with ^ W °P m of x/a 

ty, arising from diffemces on what they see as increasing French niar ' fl * AAST ^.CHT, Holland Hie 

Bosnia, Eastern Europe, the cm- disenchantment with the promises ^l n h ^. fortune 2®^“* Gormans did in 

barao on Iraq, the Middle East, of the Maastricht treaty. Germa- t Hyland n known as the “rape of 

^described as bringing a Paris- ny, for good and understandable busl^iFimd sooShSi TJ* Dutchmen K&exi- 
Londoo-Moscow rapprochement reason, wants NATO and the Eu- ^ confiscation of their gold 

versus a Washington-Bonn-Arab ropean Union on both its western h rfmp f?k, n t0 J!? n pro P^- He alverware, but understood 
polar aiignment. anSeasteni boiderc; it does not “ft ^ E2??* as war measu^S*^ 

This is exceedingly dangerous, want to remain the frontline buffer ha<L wbo XU?™? Hollanders resented the 

Paris still aims for a much more for France that it has been. **est SSStaaS 

vigorous, competent European Despite the terrible uncertain- defendant ® a “ ous mama B e 111 w orld. Father Erich 

identity." But noting ties of Moscow, France is tempt- ” deffindanl - Wasmatm, a TyrolesSj^ 

that the old, automatic confi- ed to think or Russia as helping to 1Q1Q. Oirt of fbWa in 1877 made 

dence in British-U.S. relations contain Germany. As Yogi Berra vntOIUOessa the collection. His boolL^rS! 

has frayed while Germany and raid, ;t’s getting too much like PARIS — Despatches redeved in *SSi nt £%encein theAnimS 

America are close on many issues, that old dqi vu all over again. Pans from various quarters state 15 ^gely devoied to 

the French are thinking more of The die isn t casL It is still that, owing to the rapid advan« ty^Tthf capac£ 


Britain as their prime partner. 

It is a grievous mistake of some 
French strategists to suppose that 
the American drawdown in Eu- 
rope, and perhaps mounting iso- 
lationism, will provide the magic 
stimulus they have never been 
able to inject in Western Europe 
for it to create its own autono- 
mous defense. More likely than 
invigorating their neighbors, loss 
of NATO credibility would un- 
ravel the continental system. 

Relations between France and 
Germany, the other essential pil- 
lar of the current structure, are 
studded with more and more 
thorns. The issues are not insur- 
mountable. They oould be com- 
posed. For example, Germany’s 
intense concern with Eastern Eu- 
rope is not incompatible with 
French insistence on paying more 
attention to North Africa, 

The French-German partner- 
ship remains the key to the future 
of the European Union, whether 
it has a chance of increasing con- 
solidation on a large scale or is 
due to weaken into an extensive 
version of Charles de Gaulle's 
“Europe des patries.” 

The British are pleased with 
what they see as increasing French 
disenchantment with the promises 
of the Maastricht treaty. Germa- 
ny, for good and understandable 
reason, wants NATO and the Eu- 
ropean Union on both its western 
and eastern borders; it does not 
want to remain the frontline buffer 
for France that it has been. 


possible to reassert the themes of 
mutual support, accommodation, 
perception of national interest as 
a grand pattern including as 
many as possible in an orderly 
world. But it won’t happen with- 
out energy and determination, 
and unfortunately no major gov- 
ernment is strong enough and no 
current leader convincing enough 
to assure the needed momentum. 

Thing? can fall apart by them- 
selves, for petty reasons. But if 
that is allowed to happen, in full 
knowledge of the past that lurks 
ahead, then the French philoso- 
pher Alain Finkiefloaut will be 
justified in considering the 20th 
“the useless century.” 

© Flora Lewis. 


quo is unsustainable for the alli- 
ance. Even traditionally support- 
ive senators will call For US 
troops to come home unless it re- 
mains dear (hat decisions about 
future security are being made in 
NATO, not through the European 
Union. Signs that Europe is shoul- 
dering a major share of the burden 
of stabilizing its border region 
will increase congressional sup- 
port for NATO expansion — a 
virtuous trans-Atlantic circle. 

Russia is crucial for Europe's 
security. Russia’s future is fikefy up 
remain uncertain, perhaps for dev ‘ 
cades, and the idea of holding NA- 
TO's growth hostage to the strug- 
gle bemg waged for Russia’s soul is 
a prescription for political paraly- 
sis and strategic impotence. 

It is premature to conclude that 
NATO expansion could decisive- 
ly tip the power balance in Mos- 
cow. Russian democrats are un- 
derstandably concerned, but 
Russia’s future will be deter- 
mined by far more important fac- 
tors. For Russia’s future, NATO 
expansion is one small factor. For 
determining Central Europe's 
fate, it is a major factor. 

The real issue is this; What is 
Russia's legitimate place in the 
emerging European security or- 
der? NATO expansion does not 
exclude Russia from Europe, only 
from NATO. What matters is 
that the West pursue a broad, 
balanced strategy to expand co- 
operation with Russia in an all- 
European context, with NATO 
expansion as part of the package. 

Russian concerns need to be 
taken into account in the formu- 
lation of any security guarantees 
that NATO extends to countries 
in East-Central Europe. There 
can be no question of giving Mos- 
cow a veto, but the alliance 
should develop new mechanisms 
of consultation that give Russia a 
meaningful role and voice in Eu- 
ropean security. Important secu- 
rity issues now to be discussed 
wuh Russia before key decisions 
are made, not afterward. 

hi the final analysis, however, 
ill-founded Russian concerns, of- 
ten verging on paranoia, are a 
poor guide for Western policy. 

Russians can move be- 
yond the clichfcs that dominate 
their discussions on NATO ex- 
pansion. Even so, dealing with 
Russia on this issue will not nec- 
essarily get easier with time. 

a senior analyst at 
the Rand Corporation, contributed 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO " 

1894: Bigamy Alleged <* ** boishevias, the civilian 

LONDON - A case which 

promises to afford sensational de- bwn hi H ^dy 

tails comes on in the next sitting who *5 Reds * 

of the Divorce court. The action British waSim whcn 

arises out of the eccentric conduct heIpe<f to evaca- 

of a member of Parliament About ,W ° 

a dozen years ago be formed an 1944,. IWith , 

attachment for a young woman of * Stolen 

humble birth and ultimately mar- MAASTRICHT Hollanrt -n. 
ried her, settling half his fortune meanest thin g the Germ™ j i ■ 
upon her. After her death a man Holland bbaown 
turoed up who claimed to be her the anti.”The DuS^L^lf 
husband, and sought to establish ed the confiscationo^i^S^ 
his rights to her property. He 

brought an action, making the diose as war measiin^D ers ' ood 

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Dean Rusk: Flinty Fidelity 

And Character to the End 


By Edwin M. Yoder Jr. 


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YXTASHINGTON — Could it be 
7 * psn of the unfathomable di- 
vine plan, more than mere coinci- 
dence, that Dean Rusk, the former 
secretary of state, and my beloved 
mentor James R. Caldwell Jr. died 
within a month of one another? J 
choose to suspect it. Tim died in 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina, just 
before Thanksgiving, Mr. Rusk in 
Athens, Georgia, on Dec. 21. 

Their friendship was the source of 
my own modest personal acquaint- 
ance with Mr. Rusk, and the reason 
why I think I understood certain 
things about him that puzzled others 
when he became a beleaguered fig- 
ure in the Vietnam years. 

Jim Caldwell and Dean Rusk 
roomed together, and vied for lop 

It became his destiny to 
battle it out courteously 
with critics of the tear. 



*i<m qf\4T(i 


class honors, at Davidson CoLlege. 
where Mr. Rusk was nicknamed Eli- 
jah because he was older than other 
students. His father, a Presbyterian 
minister, suffered from chronic lar- 
yngitis, and that tragedy thrust the 
family into hardship. Presbyterians 
are a folk of the Word, preached and 
taught, and a parson without a voice 
is almost a contradiction in terms. 

When Tun Caldwell was leaching 
me much of what 1 know about 
history at Chapel Hill in the 1950s, 
his two favorite subjects in informal 
conversation were Dean Rusk (by 
then head of the Rockefeller Foun- 
dation) and the China-Burma- India 
theater during World War H. There, 
he had served, as had Mr. Rusk, as 
an intelligence officer and shared 
a deep attachment to their com- 
mander, General Joseph (Vinegar 
Joe.) S til well. General S til well was, 
in turn, a prot£g& of General George 
Marshall; so here there was hierar- 
chy of loyalties. 

In the eyes of Jim Caldwell and 
Dean Rusk, General Marshall was 
the greatest American military fig- 
ure since Robert E. Lee — indeed, 
the only one fit to be compared 
with him. Some took it as wit when 
Mr. Rusk was asked on a govern- 
ment disclosure form whether any 
of his relatives had ever tried to 
overthrow the government of the 
United States and answered that 
two of his grandfathers had. But he 
was speaking of Confederate sol- 
diers who had followed Lee; and 
to Southerners of his upbringing 


that could never be a joke entirely. 

If you knew a bit about Jim Cald- 
well. a consummate teacher who 
never forgot a student; about Da- 
vidson College in their time ("Gene- 
va on the Catawba," as it was fondly 
known for its Calvinist austerity); 
and about General Marshal) and 
General Stilwell, you could largely 
infer what Dean Rusk was like at the 
core and how he would respond to 
the crucible of high office. 

Unswerving principle, an incisive 
candor, self-effacement, courtesy and 
magnanimity to foes, adamant obedi- 
ence to the chain of command — 
those were the key qualities. And you 
could have predicted that when the 
testing time came, adversity would 
□ot weaken but reinforce his tensile 
strength, as flame tempers steel. 

General Stilwell himself had sec 
the standard of tenacity and candor, 
early in the World War II, when 
asked what he would "claim" about 
the defeat in Burma by the Japanese. 
"1 claim that we took a hell of a 
licking and we ought to go and take 
Burma back,” he said, with an hon- 
esty remarkable among (he excuse- 
making brass of the time. 

It became Mr. Rink's unsought 
destiny, as secretary of state, to bat- 
tle it out. courteously but pointedly, 
with the many official critics of the 
Vietnam War. Some popiiyays of 
the Kennedy circle found him baf- 
fling in that role. He would not play 
the Washington game of talking out 
of school and reserved his doubts for 
the president’s ear alone. 

Even when targeted as an accesso- 
ry to war crimes, he denied himself 
the solace of saying one thing in the 
Oval Office and another at Wash- 
ington dinner tables. 

For me, the flinty fidelities of these 
two old college friends, Jim Caldwell 
and Dean Rusk, corrected a youthful 
tendency to underestimate the cen- 
trality of character in life. Of both 
could be said what a eulogist said of 
Tim Caldwell at his recent memorial 
service: "He was in the best sense 
a Christian gentleman — not pietistic 
— but a self-described ’John Knox 
man* who knew the human condition 
... the mining of a dependence on 
the grace of God, and of . . . compas- 
sion and responsibility.” 

like their pantheon of heroes, Lee, 
Marshall and Stilwell, they lived by 
the principle that it is who you are 
and what rules you live by, far more 
than the caprices of fortune or favor, 
that count Those qualities some- 
times seem so rare, even in high of- 
fice, that we count them remarkable. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


The Coalition Held in the Ardennes, and It Still Endures 


WE 


ASHINGTON — Before dawn on Dec. 
1944, Hitler’s armored legions 
moved out of the fog, drizzle and sleet blan- 
keting their Ardennes- Eifel concentration ar- 
eas to attack four unsuspecting American di- 
visions. No one should have been surprised. 

1944 BULGE 1994 

The American army had seen German coun- 
teroffensives before; at the Kasserine Pass, at 
Anzio, in Normandy, and during the previous 
fall in Lorraine. But in December 1944 the 
Germans needed a strategic miracle. 

Over the misgivings of his generals. Hitler 
devised a bold stroke to reverse his military 
fortunes in the west: an offensive using more 
than two dozen rebuilt or newly constituted 
divisions from a manpower pool hastily ex- 
panded lo include young teenage boys and 
marginally fit old men. He called his opera- 
tion Wacnt am Rhein (Watch an the Rhine). 
The plan combined insight, brilliance and 
foolhardiness in a desperate gamble to cripple 
the Allied armies at Germany’s West Wall. 

In broadest terms, Hiller’s concept re- 
played the successful 1940 campaign that 
brought Nazi dominance over Belgium. 
France, Luxembourg and the Netherlands. 
In 1940, the Wehrmacht’s drive to the sea 
isolated the French Army from the British 
and north European Allies. At that tune, Ger- 
man planners correctly gauged the slow, dis- 
trustful nature of coalition decisions. From 
the point of view of numbers, the 1940 plan 
should have failed. In 1944, Hitler, whose 
willpower overshadowed his rationality, felt 
another dash to the sea could turn the tide. 

Once again, (he Ardennes would provide 
the avenue for Hitler's tanks. Its twisting 
roads and picturesque villages, dotting 
stream lines and road junctions amid forest- 


ry Roger Grillo 

ed hills, would become the scene of one of 
the bloodiest battles of the war. 

But in 1944 the German force was smaller 
and the race would be run intentionally in 
bad weather to shield the attackers from the 
Allied air forces. It also would be shorter: 
Antwerp, not the north coast of France; 
would be the goal Again, the Allies had 
obliged the attackers by thinly manning the 
sector in order to free troops for areas that 
were considered more critical. 

Twenty German divisions hit four Ameri- 
can divisions the first day. Hiller thought 
that Americans were poor on defease, and he 
counted on numerical superiority to break 
clear paths for his panzers. By nightfall on 
the loth, indicators that Hitler bad been 
wrong began to appear. No American units 
folded or fled. Even though many soldiers 
were encircled, most continued to resist until 
their ammunition gave out. While ground was 
lost, so was Hitler’s timetable. 

By Dec. 19th, Hitler’s plan had essentially 
failed, though he continual the attack, adding 
forces. Despite the great tear in the lines, the 
Allies had responded quickly. Reserves were 
rushed to shore up the northern sector, and 
that day the design for German defeat was 
drawn, with the German salient still growing, 
crisis loomed in the Allied camp. Drastic 
action was needed. The decisions were made 
in Verdun, where 28 years before a generation 
of Frenchmen had sacrificed themselves fol- 
lowing the watchword "They shall not pass.” 

The supreme Allied commander, General 
Dwight Eisenhower, made the decisions. 
George Patton's army would turn north 
against the Bulge's underbelly. With Ameri- 
can paratroopers reinforcing Bastogne in the 


south and the St. VI th garrison establishing a 
firm defense in the north, the "Bulge," as 
war correspondents bad dubbed it, seemed 
contained within firming boundaries. But 
the next day. with the enemy onslaught 
bypassing Sl Vith and Basrogne and threat- 
ening the coordinated co mman d of the field 
armies, Eisenhower split the battlefield. 
Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery would 
oversee the north flank. General Omar 
Bradley retained control in the south. 

The Sl Vith garrison held for nearly six 
days, breaking the German main effort. 


By the end of January, most of the 
ground lost in the Ardennes and 
the southern attack carea in 
Alsace had been recovered. 

Meanwhile, Bastogne was encircled. Both 
sides fought desperately on a battlefield now 
frozen and covered with snow. 

The relief of Bastogne did not bring an end 
to the fighting. Fiercer battles erupted as 
Hitler shifted the weight of his attacks south- 
ward against the Bastogne corridor. 

Cracks in the coalition sparked a com- 
mand crisis. Montgomery raised anew argu- 
ments over basic strategy and his demand to 
command the Allied ground forces. Eisen- 
hower soon found himself caught between a 
war of newspaper articles on both sides of the 
Atlantic and the disagreements of his own 
generals in the theater. Bradley fumed over 
Montgomery’s control of two of his armies 
and was infuriated by the field marshal's de- 
lays in mounting a major counteroffensive. 

When Hitler shifted reserves to ihe Alsace 


region to mount another offensive to aid his 
stalled Ardennes assaults, Eisenhower at- 
tempted to create reserves by shortening his 


£ 


it of Alsace. The 
e’s own 


were incensed, 
commander. General 


line, essentially surrendering Strasbourg and 
French 
army group 
Jacob Devers, delayed the withdrawal and 
met the new German attacks with a success- 
ful defense that yielded less ground than 
ordered. Strasbourg was saved. 

By the end of January, most of the 
ground lost in the Ardennes and in the 
southern attack area in Alsace had been 
recovered. The two sides had suffered more 
than 100,000 casualties between them. 

Historians have long argued whether Hit- 
lei’s offensive delayed Allied victory or ad- 
vanced it, whether Montgomery was' right to 
delay and push to change the strategy or 
whether Patton and Bradley could have 
somehow trapped the entire German army. 
Veterans have long argued that their own 
unit fought best, that Sl Vith and not Bas- 
togne was the key or that Alsace was part or 
not part of the entire campaign. 

More significant is what Hitler and other 
dictators have failed to understand. Dozens 
of monuments in Belgian and Luxembourg 
villages mark the sacrifice that free men are 
willing to make for their own freedom and 
the freedom of others. The coalition that Ei- 
senhower led, though often visibly agitated 
and argumentative, never came close to crack- 
ing or failing. Not only did it weather the 
storms of battle; it went on to weather the 
storms and doldrums of peace and the Cold 
War. It still endures. 


The writer, a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. 
Army and a historian at its Center of Military 
History in Washington, contributed this com- 
ment to the International Herald Tribune. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Turks and Kurds 

The editorial entitled "A Stain 
on Turkey” (Opinion, Dec. 16) dem- 
onstrates once again that, however 
well-intentioned, foreign observers 
cannot fully comprehend the rami- 
fications of the so-called Kurdish 
issue. It might be a question of 
democracy and human rights for 
foreign friends and “a matter of 
great political and strategic worry*’ 
for Western governments, but it is a 
matter of survival for us Turks, 
who do not wish our country to be 
ethnically fragmented and turned 
into a new Bosnia. 

A “political accommodation" 
with the Kurds — and I presume 
with the Kurdish terrorists — ac- 
cording regional autonomy, cultur- 
al privileges etc. would open a Pan- 
dora’s box in a country where there 


are several ethnic groups. What 
help could our Western "friends,” 
with their dismal record in Bosnia, 
give us in such an event? 

ALTEMUR KiLIC. 

Istanbul. 

For the Good oi Europe 

Regarding the editorial “To Add 
Jobs in Europe ” ( Dec. 27): 

The editorial suggests that "struc- 
tural” unemployment in Europe can 
be overcome by reducing govern- 
ments* revenues and by making 
minimum wages and working hours 
more flexible. Is it really as simple as 
that? Doesn’t this imply a crippling 
of the European welfare state, fur- 
ther reducing mass purchasing pow- 
er al the same time that economists 
deplore the stagnation of consumer 


demand? Why should Europe seek to 
increase the number of "working 
poor” by even further deregulation? 
What kind of society is envisaged in 
which people are expected to contrib- 
ute to high productivity through low- 
er wages and longer working hours? 

GUNTHER HORZETZKY. 

Secretary of the President 
Confederation of 
German Trade Unions. 

Dusseldorf. 

Trials of a Priest 

Greek Helsinki Monitor, which is 
responsible for the information on 
Greek human rights problems in- 
cluded in Aaron Rhodes’s opinion 
article "Threats to Human Rights in 
Europe Are Threats to Security as 
Well’ (Dec 15), would like to reply 
to Ambassador Dimitris Macris’s 


comment (“Don't Include Greece." 
Letters, Dec 20). 

Contrary to his assertion, Greece 
today is unfortunately not the excep- 
tion but the rule in how Balkan coun- 
tries treat minorities and dissem. 

Ambassador Maoris writes that 
“Nikodimos Tsaricnias continued to 
present himself as a representative of 
the Greek Orthodox Church, though 
be had no right to do so.” Father 
Tsar icnias belongs lo the Macedonian 
Orthodox Church, and does not 
claim any links to the Greek Ortho- 
dox Church. The courts have convict- 
ed him 12 times because they do not 
recognize his right to belong to any 
church but the Greek one, since be is 
a citizen and a resident of Greece, an 
argument that the Greek govern- 
ment’s spokesperson, Evangeios Ve- 
□izelos, reaffirmed on Dec. 14. 

Such precedent is dangerous for 


the Balkans. Among other things, it 
can be used by other Balkan coun- 
tries against Grade priests who live in 
or visit them. 

PANAYOTE ELIAS DIMITRAS. 

Greek Helsinki Monitor. 

Kifisia, Greece. 

Since it had become obvious that 
the Church of Greece was deter- 
mined to expel me for my views and 
my human rights activities, I joined 
the Macedonian Orthodox Church, 
and 1 have been serving it as a brother 
of its St George the Great Martyr 
monastery. Moreover, I have stated 
to the courts that 1 respect the 
Church of Greece's decision, and j 
have therefore never claimed to be- 
long to it after it decided to expel me. 

Father NIKODIMOS TSARKN1A&. 

Aridaia Bellas. 

Greece. 




\ r 






'•J iC 


.. . 

, ;l "■ 


BOOKS 


DAYS OF INFAMY: 

MacArtbur, Roosevelt, 
Churchill — The Shocking 
Truth Revealed 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


By John Costello. 
$24. Pocket. 


448 pages. 


Reviewed by 
Douglas Brinkley 

I T was with some trepidation 
that I opened John Costello’s 
new book on Pearl Harbor^ 
“Days of Infamy,” turned off by 
its tabloid dust jacket: "MacAr- 
thur. Roosevelt, ChurchiB — 
The Shocking Truth Revealed.” 
To my relief, I found a remark- 
able and original scholarly con- 


• Ronald Holden, head of 
“France in Your Glass,” a Seat- 
tle-based wine-tour company, is 
reading “ French or Foe " by Pol- 
ly Platt. 

“It is the best compendium 
I’ve ever seen on die differences 
and similarities between French 
and American cultures, with 
dozens of on-the-mark anec- 
dotes.” (IHT) 



been written on Peari Harbor — 
notably Gordon Prange’s magjs- 

able and ongrnai scnoiaixy w hi- ■ Al Paro We S^ t 

of such good but the bn high- 

tortunToD the topic of Peari ly onsafionatard rubbish. 


Harbor are indeed smalL 
From the moment of the sur- 
prise attack on Dec. 7, 1941, 
conspiracy theorists with firm 
opinions and few facts have 
fanned inflammatory specula- 
tion Lhat Franklin Rooscvdt had 
out-Machiaveflied Machiavelh 
bv allowing the Japanese to de- 
stroy the U.S. fleet in Hawan in 
older to force rduciant Amen- 


Costello, a popular British 
scholar of World War □ with 
nearly a dozen books under his 
belt, adopts the stance of histori- 
an as probing detective; in this 
TTictsmra his painstakin g archival 
research has been especially 
fruitful With documents to sup- 
port his case, Costello success- 
fully rehabilitates the railroaded 
careers of the Pacific Fleet coin- 


compelling narrative that is 
bound to upset admirers of Gen- 
eral Douglas MacArthur. 

The nub of the matter, the 
heart of the drama of Dec. 7 
and 8, 1941, Costello says, 
played out at Clark Field in the 
Philippines nine hours after the 
attack on Pearl Harbor, when 
MacArtbur’s vulnerable air 
force was demolished on the 
ground. The analysis is not par- 
ticularly new, for the Philip- 
pines debacle, particularly 
MacArthur’s decision to leave 
his planes resting wing- to- wing 


ample cause for FDR to relieve 
him of bis duties immediately. 

Why didn't be? Costello im- 
plies that MacArthur was more 
than a wily opportunist whose 
mastery of the public relations 
aspect of war enabled him to use 
his inflated reputation as a na- 
tional boo to escape public em- 
barrassment and presidential 
dismissal. He finds tainted, per- 
haps treasonous conduct: a 
$500,000 personal payoff to 
MacArthur from President Ma- 
nuel Quezon of the Philippines, 
perhaps a bribe to garner U.S. 
neutrality, but ostensibly to 
“rocompeasc and reward, how- 
ever inadequate, for distin- 
guished service rendered be- 
tween November 15, 1935 and 
December 30, 1941." This 
charge is not new, but like a 
cagey prosecutor Costello moves 
the readier to deem MacArthur' s 
acceptance of the money, for 
whatever reason, reprehensible. 

Costello’s chapters on the 
blemished military careers of 
Kimm el and Short are also con- 
troversial. He convincingly 
demonstrates that both officers 
were unfairly reprimanded and 
relieved of duty, left to bear the 


tn frtTt;e reluctant Amen- careers ot me ranuc new ~ reuevea oi auty, ten to oca r uw 

«t|A inevitabOitv of mander, Admiral Husband E. tike sitting ducks, has ]<mg baf- brunt of the blame that rightful- 
KimmeL and the U.S. Army’s fled scholars of the Pacific War. ly belong to MacArthur and the 
Sowto Hawaiian commander, Lieuten- Forced to retreat, MacArthur 
ant General Walter C Short, evacuated Manila Christmas 


ttXSZXZSM Sari Harbor scapegoats, in a 

BRIDGE 


ly belong t 

Roosevelt administration. 

_ - - . , “It may be too late for Admi- 

Eve, and with great fanfare ral Kimmel and General Short,” 
moved his hea dq u art ers to Cor- watts CbsteUo in an unusual 
regidor, an island fortress at the display of advocacy history, 
mouth erf Manila Bay, just off “But there is now a compelling 
the Bataan Peninsula. Costel- 


By Alan Truscott 

C OVER the West and South 
hands in the 
deal and put yoursdf m 
East seat You are defending 
four 


mond ten. The diamond ace is 
then the 10th trick. 


If East sees this coming, he 
wifi return a diamond at the 
second trick. That cuts South’s. 

as* ‘~~r,Zr c^vnth has line of co mm u ni cation with the 

our spades after SOTtnnas dumm y. ,f be attempts ,o score 

optmedonesp^e Md Jumprf ^ d^itond trickTUtuediare- 
tofour spades following a :<me ^ mff. And if South « 

no-trump part- a^mps, he wffl have no orders 

ner has led the diamond four. score dummy’s remam- 

dSnmy has played tov^tmd diamond winner. Either 

South has played the qwxaun B Somi ^ folir Josers and 
der your king- Now plan your ^ gpxoe fails. 


lo's contribution to this well- 
known story is fresh documen- 
tary evidence that MacArthur 
was indeed derelict in his duty. 

It is impossible to disagree 
with Costello’s conclusion that 
MacArtbnr’s failure to launch a 
pr eem ptive air strike ag ai n st 
Japan e se bases in Formosa im- 
mediatdy following Peari Har- 
bor, despite specific and direct 
n Washington, was 


‘But there is now a co m pelli n g 
case to be made for putting the 
public record straight with a 
posthumous restoration to the 
full ranks that the two Hawaiian 
commanders would have at- 
tained had they not been forced 
to retire in disgrace.” 

Douglas Brinkley, director of 
the Eisenhower Center and asso- 
ciate professor of history at the 
University of New Orleans, wrote 
this for The Washington Post. 


defense. 

If y<» 


are defending four 




^ihabletha* West has' it. 

South has another 
^J^cUnd has unblocked the 

Sfo be able to finesse the 
ten subsequently- 
East may think about 
TTTw- fl ad recognize wA ihe 
“met 

irti. That is a surrounding or 
C Hwich olay that neutralizes 
^rrnny’s nine if South had A J 
d ^K y j x. But as the cards are, 
dub Play is fatal to the 
Sense. South wins, draws, 

initOP® 311(1 


NORTH 
*72 
OK J 63 
■> A Ifl 7 5 
*943 

WEST EAST 

*J *864 

0 9 7 5 4 S' A Q 10 8 

* J 9 6 4 2 © K 3 

* K 6 2 * Q 10 8 7. 

SOUTH (D) 
*AKQ10B53 
Vl 
0 Q8 
*A45 

Easi and *Vesi were vulnerable. 

Noru. EM 
Pass 1 NX Pass 

Pass pass Pass 


south 

) * 

4 ♦ 


finesses 


the dia- Wcsi led ihc diamond four. 


INTKRNATMWA1. 


LIVING IN THE U.S.? 
Now printed in 
NewVork 
For SAME Day 
DELIVERY IN KEY CITIES 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1-800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-752-3890) 


IN MEMORIAM 


Our Commitments, Principles, and Moral Values 


died: Bosnia, 1994 


On the occasion of the 1000th day of the siege of Sarajevo 


Morris Abram, Prince Sadruddin Aga Khan, Fouad Ajami, Richard Allen, Enrique Baron Crespo, Daniel 
Bell, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Richard Burt, Frank Carlucci, Hodding Carter, Patrick Cormack, Walter 
Cronkite, Dennis Deconcini, Part Derian, David Dinkins, Freimut Duve, Frank Fahrenkopf, Mariapia 
Fanfani, Geraldine Ferraro, Henry Louis Gates, Leslie Gelb, Valdry Giscard d’Estaing, Bianca Jagger, 
Barbara Jordan, Otto von Habsburg, Max M. Kampelman, Andreas Khoi, Lord Kings land. Lane Kirkland, 
Bernard Kouchner, Alexander Longer, John Lehman, Bemard-Heuri L£vy, Calum MacDonald, Eugene 
McCarthy, Frank McCloskey, George McGovern, Josd Maria Mendihice, Edmund Muskie, Paul Nitze, Arie 
Oostlander, Jean d’Ormesson, John O’Sullivan, William PfafE, Martin Peretz, Richard Perle, Daniel Pi cotin, 
Norman Podhoretz, Albert Rohan, Lennart Rohdin, Eugene Rostow, Donald Rumsfeld, Carl Sagan, Poul 
SchlQter. Stefan Schwarz, Christian Schwarz-Schilling, Albert Shanker, George Shultz, Henry Siegman, 
John Silber, Helmut Sonnenfeldt, Susan Sontag, Sir Jack Stewart-Claric, William Howard Taft, Baroness 
Margaret Thatcher, Leo Tindemans, Paul Volcker, John Whitehead, Simon Wiesenthal, Paul Wolfowta, 
Albert Wohlstetter, and Elmo Zumwah (all members of the American and European Action Councils for 
Peace in the Balkans). 


No flowers 
Condolences to: 

American and European Action Councils for Peace in the Balkans 
P.O.Box 10018, 1001 EA Amsterdam, the Netherlands 
P.OJJox 28268, Washington D.C. 20038-0268, USA 

Contributions to disseminate this message to: 

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P.O.Box 10018, 1001 EA Amsterdam, the Netherlands 

The Action Councils are advocacy groups dedicated to establishing peace, democracy, and stability in the Balkans, 


4 




r 



International Herald Tribune 
Friday , December 30, 1994 
Page6 









■■■' ? 


Japan’s West Coast Cuisine 


By Elizabeth Andoh 


K: 


ANAZAWA. Japan — Kanaza- 
wa, the cultural and culinary 
center of Japan's western coast 

js a modern metropolis of 

430.000 people that is steeped in four cen- 
turies of history. Although the area is fam- 
ous for exquisite silk brocades, lacquerware 
and gold leaf — a result of a legacy of arts 
and crafts dating back to its origins — 
given its size and population, it also has one 
of the greatest concentrations of excellent 
restaurants of any Japanese city. 

The present-day city and environs were 
known in feudal times as the Kaga region. 
The local cuisine, known collectively as 
Kaga rvnri, includes regional dishes such 
as jibuni (literally “bubbling pot,” a thick 
duck and wheat-gluten stew), gori no tsu- 
kuda ni (tiny soy-simmered river fish) and 
kuzu kin (opalescent arrowroot noodles 
served chilled with a dark honeylike dip- 
ping sauce). They are found on nearly 
every restaurant menu in Kanazawa, 

All three Kaga delicacies were included 
in the lunch I enjoyed at Sugi no I. an 
elegant, traditional restaurant in the Tera- 
machi district, which contains hundreds, 
of small temples and shrines. 

Food is exquisitely presented here. Our 
lunch featured a dozen bite-size foods 
charmingly arranged in a miniature land- 
scape. A slice of fish sausage shaped like a 
maple leaf was glazed an autumnal vermil- 
ion with briny uni (sea urchin); swirling 
egg shreds, captured in glistening blocks 
of aspic, evoked chrysanthemums in full 
bloom. 

A tiny crystal cup of zakuro shu (a 
pleasantly astringent pomegranate li- 
queur) was included with the savory tid- 
bits. os was a small but delicious serving of 
duck slew garnished with a dab of fiery 
wasabi horseradish. 

Most traditional Japanese meals end 
with soup, rice and pickles. Sugi no 1 
served a clear, herb-spiced broth with a 
fluffy shrimp dumpling in it. Steaming 
while rice sprinkled with gori no tsukudani 
(half- inch-long whole river fish stewed in 
seasoned soy sauce) shared space in a 
lacquered box with pearly pickled rakkyo 
(piquant ramp-like garlic bulbs) and ver- 
dant chunks of lightly salted cucumber. 
One of the pleasures of Sugi no I is the 
tableware — an impressive assortment of 
antique and modern pieces of Kutani chi- 
na, Oribe pottery and Yamanoka and Wa- 
jima nuri lacquerware. Elegant, full- 
course dinners that feature regional and 
seasonal delicacies begin at SI 50 a person. 

Fumuroya. a store that specializes in 
both fresh and dried wheat gluten, called 
ofu, also operates an adjacent small res- 
taurant that serves lunch and tea with ofu 



Menu at Fuku JVa UchL 

snacks. Various set menus are offered 
from a simple but filling $18 lunch, to a 
more elaborate and elegant full-course 
meal for $30. I adore ofu and found the 
soba bento, which features fresh wheat 
gluten resembling noodles, particularly to 
my liking. In addition to die noodles, the 
set lunch includes a small portion of jibu 
ni (Turn oroya’s version of this stew is 
made with chicken instead of duck, ofu 
and thick black shiitake mushrooms) as 
well as a taste of sesame-sauced beau curd 
sheets, or yubo, and a bowl of rice gar- 
nished with tsukuda ni fu, a vegetarian 
version of the soy-stewed gori fish. Crisp, 
colorful pickled radishes and eggplant 
were served separately with hot tea. 

Many Americans associate wheat glu- 
ten and bean curd with rigidly vegetarian 
diets. Fortunately, the Japanese approach 
these two versatile ingredients from a 
broader and more appetizing perspective. 
The menu at Hanamura, a restaurant spe- 
cializing in bean curd dishes, tofu ryori, is 
neither strictly vegetarian nor totally Jap- 
anese. Several generous but modestly 
priced dinners are available in addition to 
£ la carte items. My companion had the 
mini banquet for $30 and I tried the tofu- 
zukushi special for $23. 

Our favorite dishes were a steamed tur- 
nip carved to resemble a chrysanthemum 
and stuffed with pungent miso (fermented 
bean paste) and ground chicken, goma- 
dofu (a nutty sesame pudding), and ageda- 
shi-dofu (crispy cubes of fried bean curd 
moistened in smoky broth and garnished 
with grated ginger and chopped scallions). 
As sweets. Hanamura offered several bean 
curd confections such as shu kurimu, mod- 
eled after cream puffs but filled with 
fluffy, sweet tofu instead of whipped 
cream, for $1 JO, and ice cream for $3.30 
that was tastier than American tofu-based 
frozen desserts. 

Sushi Gempei, in the Omicho Market, 
opens at 10:30 A. M., and within an hour 
a long line has formed outside. This no- 
frills, 10-seat sushi bar attracts loyal resi- 
dents and eager visitors with its great fish 
at reasonable prices. The prices change 


acco rding to market conditions, and are 
posted on the walL Although this menu is 
m Japanese, you can figure out the prices 
by observing the color and number of 
stripes on the small plates of other cus- 
tomers at the counter. 

As 1 sat down, for example, the woman 
next to me ordered ama ebi (soft, sweet 
shrimp, on a plate with three red stripes — 
$4) and hirame (flounder, with one red 
stripe, one blade stripe — $2.50). I 
splurged on an order of chu torn (a pair of 
these melt-in-your-mouth fatty tuna sushi 
were $8 — one silver stripe), then proceed- 
ed to sample several local delicacies in the 
$3 category (two red stripes): a sweet-and- 
crunchy white-shelled clam called manju 
gai (literally “ dumpling dam”), ruby red 
meji maguro (baby bonito), and pale 
sawara (speckled mackerel). Delicious 
tekka mala (sliced tuna rolls) and ume 
shiso maki (pickled plum and herb sliced 
roll) were S2 and $ 1 JO a roll, respectively. 

The four dexterous chefs at Sushi Gem- 
pei turn out orders as quickly as you can 
give them: within 40 minutes of taking our 
seats, my partner and 1 had eaten our fill, 
with an Impressive stack of striped plates 
in front of us. We brought these to the 
register to be tallied up: $73 was our total 
including a glass of beer and tax. 


Pleasures and P lagues 
Of Traveling in India 


no' 1 


!i: 




to take us to Agra was two hours late. The 
midday heal on the platform was stifling. 

We sal on oar luggage — the best ahti-tbdt 

rR A India -I was lying in a d^-^waicted, wthew ^^ 

the bustle of passengers coming and gom& 


By Miranda Haines 

Imemaaortal Herald Tribune 


S^pitalbed in th^Indiana^^ 


tire top of my hand when I toid a when the owner had fai&badr 

the voice of a BBC announcer, on a fhde- 


I 


F you are a fan Of Japanese noodles, 
head for Fuku Wa Uchi. Oni Wa 
Soto. The unusual name refers to a 
Japanese holiday, Setsubun, cele- 
brated in early February. On that day 
dried beans are tossed out the door to 
chants of “ Oni wa soto ” (“Out with the 
ogres and tossed into the house while 
chanting “ Fuku wa uchi ” (“Bring in good 
fortune”). The decor is a bit kitschy — 
male and female ogres decorate the bath- 
room doors — and vaguely reminiscent of 
a rustic farmhouse; low tables with thin 
seat cushions are set on a dais with tatami 
mats. 

After removing your shoes and taking a 
seat, you'll be presented with a small bowl 
of matcha tea and candied lotus root and 
beans; these are on the house. I highly 
recommend the $18 wild mushroom and 
noodle dish called kinoko nabe udon. Indi- 
vidual casseroles are brought to your place, 
where they cook over burners set into the 
table (a real farmhouse would have an open 
hearth over which your pot would bubble). 
Rice and pickles are served a bit later. The 
rice is added to the broth left in the pot. 
This makes a very tasty porridge that re- 
minded me of truffle-flecked risotto. 


Elizabeth Andoh, an American journalist 
who lives in Tokyo, wrote this for The New 
York Times. 


Provence’s Green-Gold Treasure 


By Patricia Wells 

Inlemuiaital Herald Tribune 


F ONTVIEILLE. France — With 
less than 1 percent of the global 
output of olive oil, France is by 
far the world’s smallest producer. 
But the growers whose groves border this 
enchanting Proven $aJ village are con- 
vinced that their rich green-golden olive 
oil — pleasingly astringent, pure of flavor 
and Idled with the beady fragrance of 
freshly crushed olives — is among the 
finest in the world. 

So for the last four years, seven small 
mills in the Baux Valley" near Saint-Remy- 
de-Provence have joined forces to carry 
their message to the public. With mills 
woiiring almost round the dock from No- 
vember through January, the Mouliniers 
de la Vallfe des Baux crush six distinct 
varieties of olives, producing anywhere 
from 14.000 to 1 50.000 liters of extra- 
virgin and virgin oil annually per mill. (In 
the global view this is peanuts: Of the 
world's 800 million olive trees only 3.5 
million grow in France. Spain tops the list, 
with 32 percent of the crop, with Italy a 
close second at 30 percent.) 

Size may be an asset to the Baux Valiev 
growers, since traditional methods, small 
mills, personal care, and age-old olive 
trees (which can easily live to be 500 years 
old) help to produce a highly distin- 
guished oil that can be rich, creamy, fra- 
grant nonbitter, sometimes even lemony, 
all at once. Compared to even the finest of 


its Spanish and Italian counterparts, the 
Baux region’s oil is fruity without being 
cloying, astringent with no touch of bitter- 
ness, full bat not heavy, with an always 
distinctive flavor of freshly crushed olives. 

Yet even among those seven mills, there 
are characteristics that distinguish one 
from another. This year, to help consumers 
learn about the region’s ofl. as well as the 
characteristics of each mill, the growers 
have created miniature tasting packages — 
seven tiny bottles each bolding about four 
tablespoons of freshly pressed oil This 
way, tasters can easily conduct blind tast- 
ings — preferably with just a small cube of 
bread to soak up each flavorful ofl — and 
come up with a personal favorite. 

"HATS more, the samplings 
allow one to taste the freshest 
first-pressed oil, or hidle nou- 
velle, oil that is slightly limpid 
and cloudy, often more pronounced in 
flavor, almost volatile. The same oil, once 
allowed to settle naturally in huge vats 
over a period of several weeks, will be- 
come dearer, somewhat less awkward. 
rounder, less fleeting and less capricious. 

For some fans — myself included — 
there is nothing more lively, fresh, and 
fragrant than a cloudy bottle of newly 
pressed winter ofl. I love its sharp, fresh, 
ephemeral qualities and for the first 
month or so use it less in cooking and 
more as a condiment — drizzled on toast 
that has been scrubbed with tomato or 
garlic, tossed in a green salad with nothing 


Wi 


more than a sprinkling of salt, poured over 
the new season's crop of freshly cooked 
chick-peas, showered over steaming baby 
potatoes crashed with a fork. Later, as the 
oil matures, I begin to use it for sautfcing 
(when the heat really brings out its pure- 
olive flavor and aroma), for a heady garlic 
mayonnaise, or aioli, or even for a special 
batch of deep-fried potatoes. 

Taste this year’s newly pressed oil from 
die superlative Moulin Jean-Marie Connfle 
in Mauss a n e-les-AlpiDes and your first sen- 
sation is one of purity and xoundness, fol- 
lowed by a pleasant astringency at the back 
of the throat. It is almost like a wine that is 
still fermenting, almost fizzy, making you 
aware of dealing with a living, changing 
product 

The oil from the Moulin des Barres, also 
in Maussane, tastes almost like a highly 
subtle lemon vinaigrette, with a fresh 
green but not grassy aftertaste. The 1994 
crop from the Moulin Perignon & Albert 
in Aurdlle is almost a combination of the 
other two, extremely round, very soft, very 
olivey. 

But connoisseurship is a personal affair, 
so why not just taste for yourself? To 
order a coffret gout, a sampler of all seven, 
oils, priced at 95 francs (about $17 JO), 
including delivery within France, contact 
Chambre de Commerce et d’lndustrie du 
Pays d* Arles, All&e de la Nouvelle Ed use, 
13643 Arles Cedex; tel: 90.94.02.00. Oil 
can also be purchased directly at the mills. 
Prices range from 66 to 76 francs a liter. 


Miranda Hand 


In Varanasi , Indian hospitality 
more than made up for discomforts. 


ering black-and-white television, saying 
that the plague had broken out in Surat. 

My eyes focused on a bowl of fruit sml 
cod from the icebox, on my bedside table, 
and I felt with a wave of relief, that my 
sister had probably saved my fife. 

Here in raral India, she had found the 
seemingly impossible: five*star medical 
care izt an e m ergency situation. The plague 
didn’t seem such a threat from where I lay. 

We w ere three weeks into our trip and 
nothing had gone quite as planned. We 
knew that traveling m India wouldn’t be a 
piece erf cake. Dirty water, bacteria-ridden 
food even in expensive hotels, the ubiqui- 
tous “Delhi befly” and malaria are con- 
stant hazards. But we are already p lanning 
another trip. We also caught a different 
bug — old as the plague but not so curable 
— the Asian travel bug. 

Hospitality abounded from so many 
people we met. In Varanasi, I had an ear 
infection that led os to Dr. Ta nrion’s 
office in the old side erf town, above a 
small pharmacy. “So many tourists come 
here to look,” the doctor confided to us, 
“bat India is just as much a country to fed 
as to see. Come bade tomorrow at the end 
of surgery so that we can talk more.” 

f eagerly assented. His good medical 
advice and help — not to mention the mazy 
cups of tea te offered and the time we spent 
in rHsmss i np — made me welcome and 
comfortable over the next few days. 

Back in the muddy streets, flooded with 
the last of the monsoon rains, I had more 
encounters with hospitable Indians, Shop- 
ping was an adventure in the tiny cobbled 
alleys, where rats would sniff unabashed 
among the crowds and bright fights. I took 
my shoes off, as is the custom, to step onto 
the white-sheeted Door of a silk shop, and a 
wet brown mouse ran over my feet The 
shop owner laughed at my disgust and told 
me the small rodents were all “our friends.” 

It was these “friends” that were spread- 
ing the plague in western India, where we 
were heading next 

But before leaving, we looked up a friend 
erf a friend: a certain Dr. Veer Bhadra 
Mishra, the Brahman priest who lives at the 
Tulsi Ghat, and is also a professor of hy- 
draulic engineering at Banares University. 
His Ganga Action Clean-Up, an indepen- 
dent group, is dedicated to cleaning up the 
Ganges’s filthy water. He has a laboratory 
downstream from where all the city’s sew- 
age flows untreated into the river. 

“In this world of the flushing toilet, 
thousands of worshipers bathe every 
morning in the holy water while the sew- 
age continues to flow into our Ganga.” he 
told us. We couldn’t help but notice, too, 
the bloated corpses floating farther out, 
vultures perched atop them. 

Bhadra invited us to an evening service 
and dinner at his temple, the Sankat Mo- 
chan. While people bowed to touch his 
feet, he escorted us in, to the intimidating 
sound of smashing cymbals. Worshipers 
lighted torches and passed them among 
themselves, offered food and made a bed 
for their god — a statue in a crypt. For 
dinner we sat cross-legged in front of 
individual small, square wooden tables. 
“The food is made and blessed in the 
temple,” Bhadra said. 

The next day the train that was supposed 


a banana cart when the owner had his back 
turned, and managed to eat a few before he 
was pushed roughly away. 

The small cartons of fruit juk* weren't 
f n^nph to quench my thirst I began to 
fed queasy and was relieved to find our 
c oa ch when finally the huge steam engine 
screeched to a slow halt 

We sat in the station for at least half an 
hour while small children came through 
the coach sweeping away nut shells and 
the cartons with handmade twig brushes. 

A Sticky night that we passed in the basic 

second-dass sleeper (there was no option) 
was my sisters last one, as she had to fly 
home to England from Delhi the next day.I 
was looking forward to exploring die pal- 
aces of Rajasthan for two more weeks. 

At five The next morning we hung out, 
the door of the coach as the train chugged 
slowly through the suburbs of Agra to 
catdh the pink rays the morning sun threw 
on the towering dome a few kilometexs 
away: the Taj Mahal. 

Agra station involved another hectic 
melee, as we argued over tickets and rick- 
shaws until the armed police held bad: the 
mob of shouting men. We finally found 
someone to take us to the hotel of our 
choice for our price. 

NLY then (fid 1 realize, on the 
roof garden overlooking the Taj, 
how exhausted I was from the 
rattling journey. I was hot but 
not sweating, a hod sign, fa the room I 
became sick. Four alarming hours later I 
had lost bodily liquids and couldn’t keep 
any Halhirmating and delir- 

ious, I was scared for the first time. 

In my sista’s rush to get me to the Amit 
Jaggj Memorial Hospital we had left with- 
out money for the rickshaw man. He ap- 
parently was more concerned about me 
and not only waived the fare bat waited an. 
hour in the oppressive sun to take her back 
to the hotel. 

“I am lfHmmg y 
noticing the fright in: 

“And don’t worry, our hospital is easily up 
to European standards. We will have her 
wefl and strong enough to enjoy the rest of 
her stay ” My aster was in tears now. 

Two days later I got a telephone call 
from my aster at home — “You know^b 
there's plague in India?” Welaughed. Not 
that it was funny, it just seemed distant, 
and not at all scary compared to the every- 
day hazards of traveling in India. 


O 


tarn it 


l 


Dr. Jaggi said. 


tEAl IIIS 


■ Vanilla ice cream and ginger ale. 

A plate of hash browns and 13 Cokes. 
Lots of pickles. Four pieces of 
tanned toast A drifi pepper. Some 
bacon fat A shot of brandy. 
Ingredients far an exotic recipe? No, 
an unscientific list of cures for a 
holiday hangover. But there’s only one 
sure-fire remedy, Dr. Anne GdJer 
of New York hospital’s alcoholism 
treatment center told The New 
York limes: Don’t drink. 


IBS X 9 f I S f B I i / 


Nobody’s Fool 

Directed bv Robert Benton. 
U.S. 

You hear Paul Newman be- 
fore you see him in “No- 
body’s Fool,” yelling affec- 
tionately to Jessica Tandy as 
his landlady. Miss Beryl. 
With the raspiness his voice 
has taken on recently and the 
irreverence that has always 
been pan of his charm, he 
shouts: “Still alive in there, 
old lady? Didn’t die in your 


sleep, did you?” Then he sits 
in her living room chair to 
pul on his work boots, which 
isn’t easy. He has a bad knee 
and an occasional off-tire 
books job working construc- 
tion for Carl Roebuck (Bruce 
Willis), who owes him mon- 
ey. He lives alone in the 
apartment above Miss Ber- 
yl’s, and at 60 he is running 
out of time for his life to turn 
out all right Newman’s per- 
formance as Donald Sulli- 
van, who is called Sully by 


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everyone except Miss Beryl, 
is tire single best of this year 
and among the finest he has 
ever given. He plays Sully 
from the inside oat New- 
man’s approach — without 
cheap sentiment or self-pity 
— is matched by the film 
itself, exquisitely directed by. 
Robert Benton and adapted 
by him from Richard Russo’s 
novel. On screen as in the 
book, “Nobody’s Fool" has 
the rich texture of a 19th- 
century novel, as if Thacker- 
ay’s “Vanity Fair” were 
transported to the blue-collar 
town of Neath Bath in up- 
state New York. Bath is the 
kind of place people usually 
try to escape, but “Nobody’s 
Fool” is the nearly plotless 
story of those who stay. In a 
series of li felik e .small en- 
counters, some comic and 
some deeply emotional. Sully 
discovers how many people 
count on him. Throughout 
the film. Stilly’s past unfolds 
gracefully, as the pieces fall 
into his line of vision. There 
are shght flaws but this is a 
film in which almost every- 
thing works. If “Nobody’s 
Fool" is often heartbreaking 
in its sense of loss, it is also 
hopeful in the strength erf its 
emotions and the sheer beau- 
ty of its performances. 

f Caryn James, NYT) 


Street Fighter 

Directed by Steven R de 
Souza. U. S. 

If Jean-Claude Van 
Damme’s newest action-ad- 
venture film, “Street Fight- 
er, is remembered for any- 
thing, it will probably be for 
Raul Julia’s flaming portray- 
al of General M. Bison, an 
international villain of Hit- 
lerian proportions. An insane 
warlord in the make-believe 
South Asian country of Sha- 
daloo. Bison is hell-bent on 
world conquest He has tricks 
up his sleeve that are not de- 
ployed until the movie’s cha- 
otic final action sequenc e. 
Ttas role was Julia’s final 
screen performance, and the 
actor sves it his all. Julia’s 
nostnl-Baring campiness be- 
fits a film that is the latest 
action-adventure movie to be 
spun off from a video gam*. 
The movie is fast and jerky 
with no narrative continuity 
and lots of candy-colored ov- 
rotechnics. If Steven E de 
Sou^who wrote and direct-' 
od^Street Fighter,” has cap- 

tiro the look and mood ofa 
Roomie, the film is an 
«^i» dreaiy, overstuffed 
hodgepodge of poorly edited 
martial arts sequences and 
often unintelligible dialogue. 

(Stephen Holden, NYT) 



iC 



Robert Mammone, as a victim, in 


“Street Fighter*"*’, 







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International Herald Tribune 
Friday , December 30, 1994 
Page 7 




Hunting Sardinia’s Elusive 4 Porcu Abru 


1 1 E .1 6 T § S f I D / 


P ATTADA, Sardinia — The sun 
wasjusi beginning 10 lurch over 
the toothy ridge. We gathered in 
the milky dawn outside the ram- 
S “ K “* shepherd’s hut in the vallev be- 
neath Pattada, five men with rifle,! and 
one, myself, with a Nikon. 

Tommaso, Piero, Antonio. Gavino 
Pqjpmeddu. These were the hunters. 
Half a dozen dogs — bloodhounds, 
beagles and setters — on tethers barked 
and twisted in anticipation. Thev too 
blew that this was the first dav of hunt- 
ing season. 

l am not nor have never been a hunt- 
\ cr - 1 “° consume most animal products 

1 “ othj . n S | n principle against 

the killing of animals. 1 once worked for 
a year in a Boston wholesale meat mar- 
ket, spamng like Rocky with the hang- 
ing quarters of beef. Yet 1 had never 
been parry to the kill. 

I had been invited bv Tommaso, my 
brother-in-law, to tag ilong. Like most 
Sardinians, my day’s companions were 
considerably shorter and stockier than I 
dm. And like most Sardinians, thev were 
silent. It was hard to wrest a smile from 
any of them. 

"Olives” shouted Antonio, the propri- 
etor of the shack, as he passed around a 
plate of grappa-soaked grapes. He was 


By Ken Shulman 


the one jolly exception in the group. 

Olives for the hunt.” 

Hunting in Sardinia is a social rite 
that goe*. back to the earliest inhabitants 
of the island. Today, only Sardinians 
and residents of Sardinia are permitted 
to hunt on the island. The hunting 
tradition is passed down from father to 
son. Of my five companions, four were 
exposed to the sport by their fathers. 
Three carried their dead fathers* rifles. 

As it was December, the day’s prey 
w-as the porcu abru. known in the rest of 
Italy as ctngfualc and in English-speak- 
ing countries as wild boar. Smaller than 
its Continental counterpart, the Sardin- 
ian wild boar rarely exceeds 90 kilo- 
grams (200 pounds). Yet like much of 
the fauna on this still untamed island, it 
is more savage. The porcu abru usually 
covers 40 kilometers a night while forag- 
ing for food, uprooting shrubs, trees and 
crops. It is all muscle, as last as a dog in 
open terrain and Taster through the 
brush. It looks, and acts, like a hairy pig 
on steroids. Unlike a deer, it does not 


boar from its daytime slumber and drive 
him toward un 

In the distance, still out of sight, the 
dogs began to bay wildly. The noise 
grew louder and louder. Tommaso mo- 
tioned for me to be still. 1 could hear my 
heart pounding, as I waited for the boar 
to come crashing through the bushes. 
Tommaso released the safety on his dou- 
ble-barreled shotgun. I wondered 
whether 1 would flinch when he fired, 
whether the sight of the boor with its 
chest or head flattened by a single shot 
would disgust or intrigue me. 


inspire fondness or pity. And the hills in 
northern Sardinia are full of them. 


The morning was magnificent. And 
(he terrain was rugged. In half an hour, 
we had climbed 900 meters. Four rifle- 
men were posted at 30-meter intervals 
along a ridge. Antonio was circling be- 
neath with the dogs, making as much 
noise as possible to rouse a nocturnal 


A ND then the noise grew softer 
and softer. Tommaso lowered 
his rifle and put on the safety. 
"They must have passed be- 
hind the ridge,” he said, motioning for 
the group to move. 

We covered IS kilometers, climbing 
gingerly over spindly dry stone walls 
strung with barbed wire, bulling through 
gnarled, grasping vines and thorns, we 
saw the telltale marks — frenetic, six- 
inch incisions in the ground, like Reggie 
Jackson digging in at the batter’s box — 
of several wild boars. But nothing more. 
At one point 1 saw Tommaso’s broth- 


At 2 we relumed to Antonio’s shed 
for lunch. The men told bunting stories, 
half in Italian, half in their native 
tongue. They told how they usually strap 
their wild boors across the hoods of their 
cars and drive through the town, slop- 
ping at every bar for a drink. They told 
about the time one of their companions 
had killed two boars with one squeeze of 
the trigger. With what they spend on 
rifles, ammunition and the morass of 
yearly fee* and licenses, they could keep 
an entire soccer team in meat. 

"1 hunt because I like to be out of 
doors, and because I like to see the wild 
animals,” Tommaso told me on the way 
back to town. But 1 don’t think even 
Tommaso could articulate the atavistic 
instinct that governs his Sundays. Or 
that he or any of his friends would feel 
the need to. 


AUSTRIA 


Hamburg 


Vlamm 

Kunstferhaus. tat: (1) 521 77404. 
open daily. To Jan. 29: "Agypto- 
manie- Agypten und das Abend- 
land." 


Hamburger Kunsthalle, tel. (40) 
24-86-26-12, closed Mondays. To 


Feb. 12: "Munch und Deutschland " 


IRELAND 


BELGIUM 


Brussels 

Musde d'Art Ancten, tel: (2) 508- 
32-11. closed Mondays To Feb. 12: 
“De vouet a David." 


Dub Bn 

Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery of 
Modern Art, tel: (1) 872-2182, 
closed . To Jan. 22: "Hewi Hayden. 
1883-1970." 


ISRAEL 


BRITAIN 


Ken Shulman is an American writer 
based in hah’. 


cr Piero, gliding through the waist-high 
grass, his rifle balanced across his sboul- 


grass, his rifle balanced across his shoul- 
ders, the two setters at his heels like 
Mercury’s wings. U was a vision. This 
was his element, 1 thought. He would 
never be so free. 



Edinburgh 

Scottish National Portrait Gallery, 
tel- (51) 332-2266. open daily To 
Feb 26- "Sir James Gunn." 

London 

Hayward Gallery, tel: (71) 928- 
3144. open daily- To Jan 8: “The 
Romance Spirit in German Art 1790- 
1990“ 

National Gallery, tel: (71) 389- 
1 7S5. open daily. To Jan. 15: “Mak- 
ing and Meaning: The Young Michef- 
angeio." 


Tel Aviv 

Tel Aviv Museum of Art, tel: (3) 
696-1297, open daily. To March 16. 
"Keith Haring.” 



ITALY 


Genoa 

Palazzo Ducaie, lei: (10) 591-106, 
closed Mondays. To Jan. 29: "Marc 
Chagall e il suo Mondo tra Vitebsk e 
Parigi." 

Venice 

Palazzo Ducaie, tel: (4i ) 522-4047. 
open daily. To Feb. 28: "Homage to 
St Mark." 


Chagall's “Lovers in 
Blue, ” shown in Genoa. 


Fundacidn Thyssen-Bomemlsza, 
tel: (91 ) 368-01 51 . dosed Mondays. 


tel: (91 ) 368-01 51 . dosed Mondays. 
To Feb. 12: "El agio de Oro del 
Palsaje Hotandes.” 


SWEDEN 


DENMARK 


JAPAN 


Humlebaek 

Louisiana Museum of Modem Art: 
tel 42-19-C7-19. open daily. To Feb. 
5: 'Toulouse-Lautrec and Parts.” 




Touring the World Inside a Chinese Park 


By Steven Mufson 

Washington Fast Service 


S HENZHEN, China — East is 
east, and west is west, and never 
the twain shall meet unless it’s in 
an amusement park in southern 
China. Here Mount Fuji rises within a 
short walk from the Grand Canyon, the 
Eiffel Tower peers out over Cambodia's 
Angkor Wat, and a typical Southeast 
Asian waterside village can be seen from 
Sl Marie’s Square in Venice. 

Window of the World, where 118 
famous world sites are reproduced — all 
in miniature — has drawn more than 2 
milli on visitors in its first six months. 

Most Chinese people who migrate to 
Shenzhen go for work and to make mon- 
ey. Thus, this export center of more than 
2 milli on people has cash to spare and 
many workers who are ready to spend it 
And so amid the high-rise apartment 
- buildings and low-cost factories in this 
^ Chin ese boom town, three Chinese com- 
panies decided to sink about $60 million 
into a park that would take visitors 
around the world in 80 minutes. 


Window of the World lies alongside a 
busy car and truck route that leads out 
of Shenzhen north to Guangzhou. The 
park looms smaller than life, like a 
strange mirage after miles of construc- 
tion sites and shabby buildings. At its 
northern edge, a replica of the Golden 
Gate Bridge arches over the roadway. 

Admission costs about $20 — four or 
five days' salary for most workers in 
Shenzhen. 

Inside the gate lies the World Square, 
an open rotunda with Greek columns, 
Egyptian hieroglyphs and famous gates 
from around the world- Small disks have 
been laid into the pavement measuring 
the distances from Shenzhen to other big 
cities and capitals. Standing here, one 
can imagine that all roads lead to Shenz- 
hen. 


pretty much like the real thing, with an 
elevator fenying visitors up the side. 

The designers of the park must have 
been Francophiles, because beyond the 
Eiffel Tower stood a convincing replica 
of the Arc de Triomphe, built large 
enough for a small truck to drive 
through iL 


had to step lively to avoid the tiny tour- 
ist cart shaped like a choo-choo train. 
On one side, the Colosseum of Rome 
could be seen in the foreground and the 
Pyramids behind thaL On (be other side, 
1 could see Africa: a brightly painted 


Ndebele bouse, a large sculptured ele- 
phant that people were climbing and a 


T HE scale of the reproductions 
in the park varies widely, and 
so just downstairs from the Arc 
de Triomphe, one can gaze out 
over Versailles, winch barely rises to the 
knee. Behind Versailles stands Sl Pe- 
ter’s Basilica in the Vatican, which 
comes up just above the waist. This view 
is a favorite photo spot for tourists. 

Wandering through other famous ales 
of Europe, I suddenly became confused. I 
had wound past the Leaning Tower of Pisa 
and the Cologne Cathedral, walked down 
a flight of stairs with Sl Mark's of Venice 
on my left and the windmills of Holland 
on my righL In the distance, I could see the 
real rice paddies of southern China. But I 
had lost my place on the map. 

Lucidly, a sign pointed me in the 
direction of America. Along the way, 1 


From the World Square, 1 ducked 
through Iraq’s Ishtar Gate, barely glanc- 
ing at the glass pyramid of the Louvre to 
the lefL On the other side, just past the 
monorail, stands a huge replica of the 
Eiffel Tower, 108 feel (33 meters) high, 
according to the guide map. It domi- 
nates the center of the park and looks 


phant that people were climbing and a 
panoramic view of toy-size animals at a 
Kenyan safari park. 

Beyond this lay the New World. Niag- 
ara Falls was 80 meters wide and 10 
meters high, another favorite photo op- 
portunity. And for those seeking the truly 
unique photo opportunity. Window of 
the World offers the chan ce to pose with 
lower Manhattan, the Washington Mon- 
ument, the U. S. Capitol and Mount 
Rushmore all in one picture. You can 
even see the tip of the Eiffel Tower in the 
background and a little bit of the Grand 
Canyon. 

No tourist site would be complete 
without a shopping opportunity, and a 
reproduction of a quaint European cob- 
blestone street has shops with some of 
the toys Shenzhen exports around the 
world, including Disney characters. 


Paris 

Centre Georges Pompidou, tel: ( 1 ) 
44-73-40-86. closed Tuesdays. To 
Fen 20. "Kurt Schwitters.” 

Grand Palais, tei: (1) 44131717. 
closed Tuesdays. To Jan. 9. "Gus- 
tave Cailtebotte, 1848 1894.” 

MusGe d'Art Modeme. tel: (1 ) 47- 
23-61-27. closed Mondays. To 
MarcniS: “Andre Derain. 1880-1954: 
Le Pernire du Trouble Modeme.” 
Musde de I' Art et du Costume, Pa- 
lais Galtiera. tel: (1) 47-20-85-23. 
closed Mondays. To March 12: "His- 
toire du Jeans de 1 750 a no6 Jours. ” 
Musfee du Louvre, tel: ( 1 ) 40-20- 
53-17, closed Tuesdays. To Jan. 16: 
"Amour de Poussin.' 

Musfie Marmottan-Claude Monet 
lei: 42-24-07-02, dosed Mondays. 
To Jan. 29: "Chefs-d'Oeuvre du Pa- 
lais du Belvedere de Vienne: De 
Waklm oiler a Klimt.” 


Tokyo 

Kara Museum of Contemporary 
Art. tel. (3) 3445-0651, open daily. 
To Feb. 19: “Space. Time and Memo- 
ry: Photography and Beyond in Ja- 
pan." 

MitSOkushi Museum, tel: (3) 3854- 
1111, open daily. To Jan. 22: “Rene 
Magritte.” 


Stockholm 

Nationalmuseum, tel: (B) 666-42- 
50. closed Mondays. To Jan. 8: 
“Goya." 


SWITZERLAND 


LUXEMBOURG 


Musde National d'Histoire et d'Art, 
tel: 47-93-30-214, dosed Mondays. 
To Jan. 15: "J. Kutter." A retrospec- 
tive. 


Mus£e <> Rath, tel: (22) 310-52-70, 
closed Mondays. To Feb. 12: "L'Es- 
pm d'une Collection: De Caspar Da- 
vid Fnednch a Ferdinand Hodter." 

Zurich 

Kunsthaus, tel: (1) 251-6765, 
closed Mondays. To March 5: "De- 
gas: Portraitsle." 


NETHERLANDS 


UNITED STATES 


Amsterdam 

Van Gogh Museum, tei: (20) 570- 
5252, open daily. To Jan. 15: "Odi- 
lon Redon: Prince of Dreams." 

The Hague 

Haags Gemeentemuseum, tel: 
(70) 338-1111, open daily. To April 
30: "Piet Mondrian: 1872-1944." 


NORWAY 


GERMANY 


Berlin 

Marti n-Gropius-Bau. tel: (30) 254- 
86-738. dosed Mondays. To Feb. 5: 
"Der Ffcss im Raum.” 

Cologne 

Museum Ludwig, tel: (221) 221- 
2623. closed Mondays. To Jan. B: 
"Yves Klein: Der Sprung ins Leere." 

DOssefdorf 

Kunstmuseum Dossetdorf Im Eh- 
renhol. tel: (21 1 ) 89-9-2460, closed 
Mondays. To March 19: "Die Samm- 
lung Kahnweiler: Von Gris, Braque, 
Leger und Klee bis Picasso.” 
Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-West- 
falen, tel: (211) 8381-174. dosed 
Mondays. To Jan. 8: “Yves Klein: Der 
Sprung Ins Leere (Part II).” 


Oslo 

Nasjonalgallerlet, tel: (2) 22-20-04- 
04, closed Saturdays and Sundays. 
To Jan. 15: ’Tradition and Innova- 
tion: Norwegian Art at the Turn of the 
Century.” 


POLAND 


Warsaw 


The National Museum, tel: (2) 621 - 
1031, dosed Mondays. To Feb. 19: 
“The Coflection of Boleslaw and Una 
Nawrodd.” 


SPAIN 


Madrid 

FundadOn Juan March, tel: (1) 
435-42-40, open dally. To Jan. 22: 
‘Tesoros del Arte JaponeK Periodo 
Edo 1615-1868.” 


Atlanta 

High Museum of Art, tel: (404 ) 577 
6940, dosed Sundays. To Jan. 14: 
‘Workers, An Archaelogy of the In- 
dustrial Age: Photographs by Sebas- 
ti‘o Salgado.” 

Houston 

The Menil Collection, tel: (713) 
525-9400. closed Mondays and 
Tuesdays. To Jan. 9: "Colonial Mas- 
terpieces tram Bolivia" 

New York 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, tel: 
(212) 570-3951, dosed Mondays. 
To Jan. 8: “Origins of impression- 
ism.” Also, to March 26: “Greek 
Gold: Jewelry of the Classical 
World." 

San Francisco 

M.H. de Young Memorial Museum, 
tel: (415) 863-3330, dosed Mon- 
days and Tuesdays. To March 5: ”A 
Gift to America: Masterpieces of Eu- 
ropean Painting from the Samuel H. 
Kress Collection." 

Wa shin g to n 

National Gallery of Art, tel: (202) 
737-4215, open dally. To March 19: 
"Italian Renaissance Architecture." 


Some museums may be closed an 
holidays. Check before going. 




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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1994 


** 


Still, No Sign of ‘When or If 
Ameri can Pilot Might Be Freed 

By Thomas W. Lippman 



rr — 

WASHINGTON — The 
UB. diplomat who is in North 
Korea seeking the release erf a 
captured U.S. Army helicopter 
pilot “made good progress" 
Thursday, but “it is still irapos- 
sible to predict when and if’ the 
flyer will be freed, the State 
Department said. 

The department’s spokes- 
man, Mike McCurry, sard “we 
assume” that the diplomat, 
Thomas Hubbard, would re- 
sume discussions on Friday, 
and said Washington was en- 
couraged that Mr. Hubbard, a 



ficial than he saw Wednesday. 

But Mr. McCurry and other 
officials refused to go into de- 
tail, saying the talks about 
Chief Warrant Officer Bobby 
Hall are in a crucial phase, 
nearly two weeks after his heli- 
copter strayed across the De- 
militarized Zone and went 
down inside North Korea. War- 
rant Officer David Hrlemon 
was killed in the incident and 
his body returned last week. 

North Korea has not said 
publicly what it wants as the 
price of Mr. Hall’s release, and 
ft is still unclear whether the 
Foreign Ministry officials Mr. 
Hubbard is talking to want the 
same thin g as the military au- 
thorities who captured Mr. 
HalL 

U.S. officials spent much of 
Thursday analyzing the text of 
a purported confession and ap- 
peal for leniency that North 
Korea said Mr. Hall signed on 
Christmas Day. The statement 
says that the North shot the 
helicopter down. 

Pentagon officials and some 
independent analysts said 
many of the personal details 
about Mr. Hall in the purported 
statement are correct, and they 
said the text appears to exoner- 
ate Mr. Hall of North Korean 
charges that he entered the 
Norm intentionally on a spying 
mission. 

in the statement, Mr. Hall 
acknowledges “our intrusion 
deep into the territorial airspace 


of North Korea," and calls the 
action “a pave infringement 
upon the sovereignty” of North 
Korea and u a flagrant violation 
of international law.” 

But the key paragraph says 
the helicopter crew’s mission 
was to fly this route: “Chun- 
chon-northeast dam -CP 
Choke-Abeam 84-west-Abeam 
32 bade to Cfcuncfaon.” AH 
those landmarks and check- 
points are inside South Korea, 
Pentagon sources said, and 
therefore the crew’s mission 
was specifically not to enter 
North Korea. Mr. Hall and Mr. 
Hflemon may have deviated 
from me missi on, as Mr. Hall’s 
purported statement said, but 
they apparently were not as- 
signed to enter Norm Korea. 

The text thus appears to con- 
firm repeated statements by 
President Bill Clinton and other 
ILS. officials mat the incursion 
into North Korea was nothing 
more than a navigational error, 
not a planned (Tossing that 
would justify further detention 
of Mr. HalL 

“They just exonerated these 
guys,” said a former officer 
with long experience in U.S. air 
operations in Korea. 

The purported statement by 
Mr. Hall provided the first de- 
tailed account of what hap- 
pened to the Ill-fated helicopter. 

“We flew along the planned 
route as far as Weontong, where 
we deviated from me route and 
flew across the Military Demar- 
cation Line," it said. “And then 
we Illegally intruded deep into 
the territorial airspace of' 
North Korea, “and were shot 
down.” The statement called 
me incident an act of “self-de- 
fense” by me North Korean 
Army. 

This phrasing acknowledges 
that me crossing was illegal and 
that me North Koreans were 
within their rights to fire on the 
helicopter, but again it does not 
indicate that the “deviation” 
was assigned or deliberate. 

“When me helicopter was 
shot, it caught fire and crashed 
into a steep mountain,” me 
statement said. “Hilemon was 
thrown from me aircraft and 
died on the spot” 


Grigory Dukor i Reuters 




Refugees from Russian bombing of Grozny at a train station Thursday at Nazran, in neighboring Ingushetia, where they are living in railcars. 

RUSSIA: 

Assault Planned 


Outside Moscow, a Hawkish Bent Reigns 


EUROPE: A Shift in Leadership 


By Alessandra Stanley 

New York Tunes Service 

PODOLSK. Russia — Russians do 
not tie yellow ribbons to trees to signal 
their sup p o rt for their soldiers fighting in 
the rebellious region called Chechnya. 
They do not put bumper stickers on their 
cars to protest me bombing mere. 

. But hoe, only SO kilometers (30 miles) 
from Moscow, support for me use of 
force seems greater than in the capital, 
where less man 30 percent of people 
surveyed favored military action. 

“We should have gone m and restored 
order there a long time ago,” said VI tali 
Repyakh, 57, a surgeon and head of me 
local blood bank. The doctor’s son-in- 
law is a medic for Interior Ministry 
troops and at risk of being sent to Chech- 
nya. 

“I don’t want my daughters husband 
to go. and I fed sorry for me soldiers 
who are there.” he said. “But Chechnya 
is a criminal republic. 1 was glad when 
they sent in the troops.” 

In Podolsk, even those who vehement- 
ly support the war — the doctor, a fac- 
tory worker, a truck driver — have some- 


thing in common with neighbors who 
oppose it. It is a deep cynicism about the 
leaders who made the decision to attack 
Chechnya, skepticism about the news 
coverage, and pessimism about how the 
offensive will turn out. 

“Yeltsin is three years too late,” Dr. 
Repyakh said. “He has to be careful not 
to go too far, now. If we get too involved, 
it will be a second Afghanistan and we’ll 
be run out of there.” 

Even though he said he supported 
President Bons N. Yeltsin’s decision, he 
was doubtful about Mr. Yeltsin’s expla- 
nation that minor nose surgery had pre- 
vented him from appearing in public for 
weeks after ordering me offensive. 

“As a surgeon, I know that someone 
after this kind of operation can be back 
at work after two days,” me doctor said. 
“I think he just wanted to hang back and 
wait and see." 

Sipping coffee at a cafe, two security 
1 contempt for Mr. Ydl- 
and said they sympa- 


Sipping 
guards ext 


sms 


thized with insubordinate soldiers who 
have refused to carry out their mission in 
Chechnya. 


“I am not shocked, I understand 
teem,” said one, a 42-year-old retired 
police officer who would only give ins 
first name, Mikhail. 

“It shows there is some h umani ty in 
our armed services,” he said. He added 
that while the dissenters would have 
been court-martialed in Soviet times, he 
doubted that they could be prosecuted. 

“The use of me army in this situation 
is not based on any law,” Mikhail added. 
“No matter how vague our laws are now, 
the constitution is supposed to be me last 
word.” 

He seemed to be referring to an article 
in the constitution that prohibits the 
armed forces from bong used to limit 
human rights. But the constitution also 
grants virtually unlimited discretion to 
me president, and in any case the coun- 
try does not have a functioning constitu- 
tional court to weigh the issue. 

“Of course Chechnya should be part 
of Russia and should live in accordance 
with our laws,” said Svetlana Dnri- 
triyeva, 35, a nurse. “But war is always 
bad. The politicians will settle the prob- 
lem, but the people here will suffer.” 


Continued from Page 1 

publicly oppose the Chechen 
intervention. Despite wide- 
ruxnors, he has yet to be 


Cbntinwd from Page 1 

France’s EU allies, and neither 
has established as smooth a re- 
lationship with Mr. Kohl as 
President Francois Mitterrand, 
who will step down this spring. 
Mr. Kohi is to visit Mr. Baha- 
dur at his winter holiday home 
at Chamonix on Thursday. 

Given the electoral con- 
straint, me French government 
has limited its EU presidency 
agenda mainly to preparatory 
work for crucial decisions tire 
Union will have to make in 
coming years. 

At me top of me list is greater 
cooperation on foreign and se- 
curity policy. Alain Lanaas- 
soure, the minister for Europe- 
an affairs, said an EU review 
conference in 1996 must do for 
security what me 1992 Maas- 
tricht treaty did for monetary 
cooperation by setting criteria 
for a single EU currency. 

But recent French initiatives 
like a joint air force unit with 
Britain and satellite work with 
Germany have been bilateral 
rather than EU-oriented, and a 
French-led report due this 
spring that is intended to start 
the 1996 debate is expected to 
be cautious and stress national 


U.S. Repatriating 
4,000 Haitians 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The 
United States told more man 
4,000 Haitian refugees at its 
military base at Guantanamo 
Bay, Cuba, on Thursday that 
they would have to return 
home, me State Department 
said. 

The refugees fled Haiti by 
boat last year to escape its mili- 
tary junta. U.S. vessels took 
them to Guantanamo Bay. 


control over policy, EU officials 
said. 

“We need to find a consensus 
on me problems before me so- 
lutions.” said Yves-Thibault de 
Stiguy, Mr. Bahadur’s adviser 
on European affairs and nomi- 
nee to become EU economics 
commissioner in late January. 

France will press its EU part- 
ners to increase aid and atten- 
tion to the Mediterranean, offi- 
cials said. The security risk of 
instability in North Africa was 
brought home dramatically by 
me hijacking of an Air France 
jet in Algiers last week, and the 
policy of increasing aid to the 
South as the Union opens up to 
me East was one of me few 
concrete results of Franco-Ger- 
man cooperation during the 
past six months. 

But even here, French work 
wiD consist mainly of preparing 
for a conference between EU 
and Mediterranean states in 
Barcelona under the Spanish 
EU presidency in October. 

France also plans a major 
push on the culture front that 
risks arousing opposition not 
only in Hollywood but in much 
of European industry. 

Culture Minister Jacques 
Toubon urged me outgoing 
commission in Brussels last 
week to go ahead with a propos- 
al to extend and toughen Eu- 
rope's quotas on television pro- 
gramming when me executive 
agency meets next Wednesday. 

The commission has delayed 
action for nearly two months 
because of a deadlock inside the 
agency and strong opposition 
to the proposal from European 
broadcasters and program pro- 
viders, who fear it will stifle 
investment and much-needed 
links with me U.S. entertain- 
ment industry. But France fears 
that failure to act before me 
commission is replaced on Jan. 
25 will kill any chance of pass- 
ing legislation during its presi- 
dency. 


POLL: America Recovers Economic Self-Confidence os Japan Loses Faith 


Coatfraed from Page 1 
War II. A slight majority said 
there was no danger that Japan 
would become too aggressive if 
it increased its military power 
in order to take part in more 
international peacekeeping op- 
erations. 

The alliance’s future is cer- 
tain to be a major theme in me 
Jan. 11 meeting in Washington 
between President Bill Clin ton 
and Prime Minister Tomiichi 
Murayaxna. State Department 
officials have made dear that 
they hope to steer the discus- 
sions away from me endless 
trade disputes that usually 


dominate such sessions and to 
focus on other aspects of me 
relationship that, m the words 
of one senior department offi- 
cial, “have dearly been neglect- 
ed in recent years.” 

But at a time of continuing 
political turmoil in Japan, mere 
is little optimism in Washing- 
ton that much new thinking will 
emerge in those talks. 

The change may fit me na- 
tional mood. For the first time 
since me question was first 
asked in 1985, a majority of 
Americans — 51 percent — 
judged the overall outcome of 
trade with Japan to be good for 


the United States. That view 
comes despite the fact that 
Washington is likely to have a 
record tirade deGdt with Tokyo 
this year. But it might reflect a 
growing sense among Ameri- 
cans that they have less to fear 
from Japanese industry, which 
has been made less competitive 
by a strengthened yen. 

In the poll, 67 percent of 
Americans said that, dollar for 
dollar, American cars are a bet- 
ter or equal value than Japan's. 
In 1985, at Detroit’s low point 
in manufacturing quality, only 
half of Americans felt that way. 

Detroit’s rise has left the Jap- 


anese unimpressed: 83 percent 
said that Japanese cars were a 
better value, and only 17 per- 
cent said me American compe- 
tition was better or equal. 

Less than eight months be- 
fore the 50th anniversary of me 
atomic bombing of Hiroshima 
and Nagasaki, only 34 percent 
of Japanese said they personal- 
ly held the attacks against the 
United States, down from half 
of all Japanese asked me same 
question in 1991. But 53 per- 
cent said they believed most of 
their countrymen harbor such 
resentments. A similar pattern 
existed in the United States. 


On Thursday, he courted that 
risk again with an appearance 
at the Burdenko military hospi- 
tal in Moscow. 

General Gromov, who had 
told Russian and Western re- 
porters about his visit but not 
the hospital staff, swept into the 
trauma ward in full unif orm, 
surrounded by television cam- 
eras, and visited 10 soldiers who 
had been wounded in me Che- 
chen fighting. 

“I come to congratulate you 
and to remind you that you are 
not forgotten,” he told five sol- 
diers lying in one room. 

Yelena G. Bonner, widow of 
the dissident Andrei D. Sakha- 
rov, resigned in protest Thurs- 
day from the presidential hu- 
man rights commission. Calling 
me conflict a “return to totali- 
tarianism,” she said: “A demo- 
cratic conn try cannot keep by 
armed force an ethnic group 
that does not want to remain in 
it." 

Grozny was quiet Thursday 
morning, but bombing and ar- 
tillery barrages became intense 
around noon. Planes were 
bombing regularly throughout 
the day. It seemed clear that the 
Russians were intending to hit 
military and strategic targets, 
like me oil refinery and anti- 
tank guns. 

Russian troops continued ar- 
tillery attacks on outlying re- 
gions, where mere was heavy 
fighting. The Russians say most 
of the fighting was started by 
Chechen forces attempting to 
break through their lines. 
—ALESSANDRA STANLEY 


In Europe, 
‘Concern’ 

On Chechen 
Fighting 

CenpMbr Our Safi From Dhpathe 

BONN — In a sign of in- 
creasing European unease 
about the fighting in Chechnya, 
Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkd 
. of Germany idd Foreign Min- 
ister Andrei V. Kozyrev of Rus- 
sia on Thursday .of Ms “great 
concern” over the fighting. 

" -France, meanwhile, an- 
nounced plans for joint diplo- 
matic action with its European 
partners over the conflict. 

Mr. Kinkd and Mr. Kozyrev 
discussed the situation in the 
separatist republic by telephone 
for more than an hour. They 
agreed that a political solution 
should be found “as soon as 
possible,” the German Foreign 
Ministry said. 

Mr. Kozyrev also said that 
European Union ambassadors 
in Moscow would be invited to 
me Foreign Ministry this week 
for talks on the Chechnya situa- 
tion. He previously met with 
EU ambassadors on Dec. 21. , 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl's 
government, along with me 
United States and other Euro- 
pean governments, has said re- 
peatedly that the Chechnya 
conflict is an internal affair for 
Russia. 

But with images of destruc- 
tion in Chechnya televised dai- 
ly, public pressure has been 
growing in Germany for a con- 
demnation of me violence: 

Bonn is eager to preserve 
dose ties with the Kremlin and 
the friendly personal relation- 
ship between President Boris N. 
Yeltsin and Chancellor KohL 
But there is increasing pressure 
on the government to break its 
silence on me fighting. 

On Wednesday, Mr. Kozyrev 
warned that his government 
was prepared to use “as much 
force as necessary” to keep the 
separatist republic from leaving 
Russia. 

In Paris, the French Foreign 
Ministry deplored the intensi- 
fied fighting, “contrary to what 
had been announced” by Mos- 
cow. 

“We understand that fighting 
has intensified, in particular 
bombing that is not sparing ci- 
vilian lives,” said a ministry 
spokeswoman, Catherine Co - a 
lonna. “The military action is” 
continuing . We deplore that 
and we continue to think that 
only negotiations will resolve 
die crisis on a lasting basis." 

Mr. Yeltsin promised on 
Tuesday that civilian areas 
would no longer be me targets 
of bombs. But intensive bomb- 
ing and shelling of me Chechen 
capital, Grozny, has since re- 
sumed. 

“We plan a number of diplo- 
matic steps with our partners in 
•the European Union,” Ms. Co- 
ionna said, giving no details. 

“We have made constant ap- 
peals to the Russian authorities 
to this effect,” she added. “We 
renew these demands. The Rus- 
sian authorities have a responsi- 
bility to spare civilian fives." 

(AFP, AP, Reuters) 




RWANDA: Despite Signs That Normal Life Is Returning, the Danger of More Violence Lurks 


Coal&med from Page 1 

ethnic hatreds. It is not even 
entirely accurate to say that me 
Hutu and Tutsi are different 
ethnic groups — they speak me 
same language, worship me 
same God, share many of me 
same cultural traditions. 

Even me physical character- 
istics that once distinguished 
mem — the Tutsi tall and thin: 
me Hutu, short and broad — 
have disappeared for vast seg- 
ments of the population after 
generations of intermarriage. 

“Bad leaders,” said Goretti 
Uwamariya, 29, when asked 


50-Car Austria Pfleup Kills 1 

The Associated Press 

VIENNA — A woman was 
killed and five people were seri- 
ously injured in a 50-car pileup 
on a highway near Graz, in 
southern Austria. The authori- 
ties said fog and excessive speed 
were the apparent causes. 


what had caused me war. It is 
the answer one hears over and 
over again in Rwanda, from 
peasants in remote villages to 
intellectuals, and it underscores 
me fact that me Hutu and the 
Tutsi lived together, friction 
contained, until politicians set 
them against each other. 

Mrs. Uwamariya, a Tutsi 
was at church on the Sunday 
before Christmas, worshiping 
with Hutu and Tntsi at a Mass 
in which her family members 
who were kflled by Hutu mobs 
in me April violence were re- 
membered: her husband, a 
brother, a sister and several 
aunts and undes. 

Mrs. Uwamariya said it 
would not be easy to live with 
the Hutu again, but it would be 
necessary to try because mere 
really was no other choice. In 
October, she gave birth to a 
daughter. 

“HI leach her to love every- 
body regardless of their tribe or 
their region,” she said. “Other- 
wise she will become like the 
killers of ber father." 


It is hard to pin a political 
labd on Rwanda at me mo- 
ment 

It falls short of being a de- 
mocracy, since no one was 
elected to any position, and the 
dominant institution is the 
Tutsi-led Rwanda Patriotic 
Front which won me war and is 
in effect the ruling political par- 
ty- 

The most important political 
leader is Major General Paul 
Kagame, who was commander 
of the rebel army and is now 
vice president and defense min- 
ister. 

But it would be unfair to call 
the government a military dic- 
tatorship. The army is one of 
the most disciplined in Africa. 
At roadblocks, soldiers, though 
dressed in rumpled uniforms, 
are polite and sober and do not 
demand money. On the Rwan- 
dan side of me border with 
Zaire, the officials are ineffi- 
cient, bureaucratic, pleasant 
and honest On the Zairian side 
they are inefficient, bureaucrat- 
ic, nasty and corrupt 


Rwanda has a civilian presi- 
dent and prime minister, and 
while they do not have General 
Kagame's influence over the 
country's political direction, 
they are more man figureheads. 

The cabinet is made up most- 
ly of civilians, and two key 
posts, interior and justice, are 
held by Hutu. Most of the 11 
provincial governors are civil- 
ians, and in Cyangugu. the 
ihird-largest province, the gov- 
ernment recently named a Hutu 
human-rights campaigner, 
Theobald Rutihunza. to the top 
spot. 

“I’m not sure how much 
power I have." Mr. Rutihunza 
said in a recent interview in his 
barren office. But he is testing it 
daily as he investigates human- 
rights abuses by the army and 
urges commanders not to arrest 
someone without sufficient evi- 
dence. 

Throughout the country, 
about 15,000 people have been 
seized on the street or hauled 
from their homes because 
someone has accused them of 


involvement in the massacres. 
Many Rwandans fear a danger- 
ous abuse of power, like that 
which marked the former gov- 
ernment. 

The human-rights picture is 
decidedly mixed. 

The justice minister allows 
foreign journalists to go into me 
prisons far more readily man 
does his counterpart in some 
democratic countries. 

The country, roughly me size 
of me state of Vermont, also is 
awash with UN human-rights 
monitors. They poke and probe 
into prisons and allegations of 
human-rights abuses to a de- 
gree mat would not be tolerated 
by a vast majority of me mem- 
bers of the United Nations. 

These contradictions have 
led to uncertainty about where 
me country is headed. Any 
hope that it will be a stable, 
relatively open society is 
doomed if the government can- 
not get me refugees back, be- 
cause me refugees will become 
the army mat plunges Rwanda 
into another round of warfare. 


Solitary Jailing 
Of Israeli Decried 

The Associated Press 

JERUSALEM — Mordechai 
Vanunu, a technician who re- 
vealed me extent of Israel’s nu- 
clear program, has spent eight 
years in solitary confinement 
and should be allowed to mix 
with other prisoners, a lawmak- 
er who visited him said Thurs- 
day. 

Dedi Zucker, head erf Parlia- 
ment’s law committee, said se- 
curity officials had imposed 
“vindictive conditions” by iso- 
lating Mr. Vanunu for so long 
and called for changes in regu- 
lations that would allow judi- 
cial review of the terms of soli- 
tary confinement. 

Mr. Vanunu smuggled pho- 
tographs out of me Dimona nu- 
clear reactor in 1986, confirm. 
,n S foreign intelligence 
assessments about me extent of 
Israel's nuclear weapons pro- 
gram. The Sunday Times of 
London published the material 
Md estimated Israel had more 
than 100 nuclear bombs. Mr. 
Vanunu was sentenced to 18 
years for treason. 


|S 


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Caravaggio, "II Suonatore di Unto 




Pace 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. DECEMBER 30, 1994 


Page 10 


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1 0 European Bd — Dts I.U Ecu T» 

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d ASEAN J 

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7 SSy— TZIdm &m 

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4 0 North America — * 

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» W GAM Australia— -* 

M wGAM Boston J 

07 nr GAM Brasilia — -S 

Al wGAM Combined — P* 

oo wGAM Cross-Market. —5 

■J4 wGAM European * 

J*' wGAM France— FF 

M \ w GAM Franc-val— SF 

J 6 wGAMGAMCO— * 

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'JO W GAM Money MklsU 53 * 

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j-71 wGAM Emero MJtlsMIJI-Fd J 177S4 

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PJ» w GAM Retative Value 3 1WJ0 

442 w GAM Selection — - — J 4WJ4 

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£44 W GAM SFSpeda, Band SF 

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1447 wGAM Worldwide * 

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w GAM Band SF SF mK 

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d Band Voter US -Dollar J . 

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0 Convert Valor Swf- — Sf ]“* 

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d Convert Valor c Sterling— I 8*44 

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d SSSsB^FdAusSA AS 100X01 

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d Crwite Bare! Fd DM A DM 107088 

0 SrtH Bond Fd DM B. DM l» 

SgSttSSS«F?S=^F ™ 

d Credb B«ta Fd Lire A Ut 220452JR 

d Credb Bond Fd Lire B_— -Lit 2 36362J 0 

0 Cr«dBBondFdPes 4 ihaA_Ptas 1780930 

d CredlaBondFdP«6tasB-P1as 

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d CS FF Bond — FF ,0 ~f 

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0 C 5 Prime Bond A SF 8 & 2 J 

d CS Prime Band B SF 

d CS Short -T. Bond DM A DM 

0 CS Shoft-T. Band DM B DM 

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0 C5Sncrt-T. Bondi B— J 

0 CS Swtn Franc Bond A— —5F fflJW 

dC 5 Swiss Franc Bond B — sp mg 

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0 Indexis Jaoon/NIkkd — T , 7 ?H, 

0 Indents G BrH/FTSF J 14132 

0 Indexis Fronee/CAC 40 FF 

0 indexis CT — FF 1 

MONAXIS , , 714 

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0 Court Terme DEM- R** 

0 Court Teroie JPY Y ZTOY 4 

0 Court Terme GBP -* 

0 Court Tome FRF FF klio 

0 Court Terme ESP — PW 

0 Court Terme ECU -Ecu 2W4 

«s inti DhreriltteM_-FF 12J® 

0 Actions Nqrd-Amcr laihies J 
0 Actions Jatanaises— — •— J »b 

0 Actions AngtaWS a, 

0 Actions Allunxmdw DM 

0 Actions Francoises FF ^7 

0 Actions Esp. & Fart Pte 

0 Actions Ittdtewies - L » 

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0 court Terme Ecu Eai 2245 

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wGAM (Special Band r 

w GAM Universal USS J 

w GSAM Comoasite * 

w Gtobai Slrategle A 3 

w Global Straleglc B_- J 

w European Strategic A s 

w European Straiefrtc B — — J 

w Trading Sirotcata A 3 

w Trading Strategic ■ 0-— - — J 
w Emera Mkts Srroleste A — J 
w Emera Mh te Strate gic B. — * 

wAHocotod Strategic Fd A — s 

w Allocated Strategic Fd B — * 

SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 41-1^2 2626 

MuhtebachitraiSe 173^H 8034-^toh 

d GAM (CHI Euroge. SF iEl"S 

d GAM (CHI Mondial SF 15636 

0 GAM ICHJPBdtiC— —-5F 27641 

SEC REGISTERED — . 

13S East 571h Street JI Y 1002231*888-1200 

wGAM Eurooe * ■fg 

WGAM Global- — S 

wGAM Interna W anpi — . * 

wGAM Japan Cooiiul — * 

w GAM North America J *144 

w GAM Pacific Basin —J I70S3 

IRISH REGISTERED UCITS 

*5-66 Lower Mount SI .Dublin 23^1-676060 

w GAM Asia Inc DM «J» 

wGAM Eurrew ACC— DM 1 D.W 

wGAM Orient Ace DM 1473J 

W GAM Tokyo Acc DM I6U4 

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w il» Global Financial S 

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GLOBAL FUTURES 4 O PT OHS SICAV 
mFFM lot Bd Progr-CHF Cl -SF *7.19 

■ GOLDMAN SACHS 

W GS Adi Rate Mart Fd II — * »47 

mGS GlOOql Curacy _—S 
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d GS world income Fund——* 

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w Granite Cooltot Eauitir—-* 

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0 GT Emerolno Ml B 1 B Sh - J 7 49 

2 GT Em MB Small Co * ||* J 685 

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0 JF GW»l Conv Tr 3 >|« < 

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d Enuteaer Ewaae. sf 

0 SFR - BAER— 

d Stockbar SF 

0 Swtssbar— SF 

0 Lteulbow— — — — » 

0 Europe Bond Fund— 

0 Dot lor Bond Fimd * 

d Austro BanfFand as 

d swta Band Fond. SF. 

d DM Bond Fund— DM 

d Convert Band Fund 5F 

0 Global Bond Fund DM 

0 Euro Stock Fund— Ecu 

0 US Stack Fund— * 

d Padflc Stack Fund * 

0 Swiss Stock Fund- 5F 

0 SpedMSwto Stock SF 

0 Japan Stock Fimd— y 

0 German Stuck Fund —DM 

0 Korean Stock Rmd 1 

0 Swiss Fnmc Cosh SF 

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d ECU CONJ — f 01 

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b Stonehenge LM 17414 
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0 Global Advbors Port NV AJ 10J7 

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l« 0 Lehman Cur Adv.AJB— — * '** 

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d Pound Sterl Ing — — J 

LIE 0 Deutsche Mark DM 1748 

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159 0 HY Euro Currencies Ecu 1547 

L72 d Swiss Franc -SF 

L76 0 US Dollar short Term- — » 1« 

139 0 HY EureCurr Dtv Id Pay— Ecu 1046 

L 00 0 Swiss Multicurrency 3F 1651 

L94 0 European Currency Eai E 8 o 

7.17 d Belol'M Franc BF 1»« 

a Convertible — — ... A 1452 

7.19 d French FroiK . .. — — ff isaa 

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747 0 Swiss Frone Short-Term — SF W4M 

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9JB 0 Swtss Frw: DtoM Pav SF 10JD 

0 CAD Mutfleur. Olv C* 1146 

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Communicati on, 

THE^^JTI I 

OF BRINGING TOGETHER.*-.*,,...,.. 

's been a nation of the arts -everyone knows it- but today, 
■ there’s another art in which Italy is an acknowledged 
world leader - the art of communication. The Italian Telecommunications System is a world-wide network of vital importance. 

Its development is the fruit of the collaboration of more than 100 companies. Together they form the integrated holding company, STET. 
The STET Group operates in all sectors of telecommunications: from services to manufacturing, from information facilities to multimedia 
activities. In other words, the STET group of companies provides the communication life-blood of the whole economic system, enabling 



people to exchange and collaborate ever more efficiently. The STET Group is a market orientated company quoted on the stock exchange 


and whose stock is owned by thousands of shareholders. It is one of the largest companies in the world with 140,000 employees, a 


revenue of $20 billion and $5 billion in investments. The STET Group activities reach out beyond its national boundaries, spreading 


Italian technology and know-how throughout the world. Like the arts, telecommunications bring together people, nations and continents. 


■ 





Telecommunications 
in Italt and the World 













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TELECOM ITALIA , , ., 

was set up on 18 August 1994 through the 
merging of five companies (SIP, Italcable, 

Intel. Telespazio and Sirm) that had until then 
managed italian telecommunications 
separately, and has thus become a global 
operator in a completely new framework. 

TELECOM ITALIA 

is now the sixth largest telecommunications 
operator in the world in terms of turnover 
and one of Europe’s prime investors 
in the sector. 

It is a joint-stock company with almost 
70.000 investors and 18% of its share 
capital is held by foreign shareholders. 

TELECOM ITALIA 
has a worldwide presence with 18 
representative offices with a large number 
of other corporate entities, it also has a 
wide-spread commercial network geared to 
provide, even abroad a speedy, integrated 
and innovative answer to the communications 
requirements of people and companies. 

“A sharp decline in financial charges achieved thanks tc 
ongoing economic and financial consolidat.cn k the clear 
remdt of a policy based on rational and integrated organi- 
sation, further strict cost reduction measures and carefully 
selected large-scale economies in order to become competi- 
tive in a free market”. 

(Francesco Chirichigno) 

Managing Director 


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THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF TELECOM 

ITALIA 



30.06.94 

31.12.93* 

REVENUES (BILL) 

14.276 

23.404 

— — ‘ — ‘ 1 1 34.5 18.164 

AnnFD VALUE (BILL) 1 1 ifZT 

ADDED VALUE / REVENUES (%> 

79,5 

77,6 

GROSS OPERATING MARGIN (BILL) 

7.994 

12.327 

GOM / REVENUES 

56 

52,7 

OPERATING PROFIT (BILL) 

3.1 36 

3.796 

NET FINANCIAL CHARGES /REVENUES <%> 5,3 

DonF.T RFFORE TAXATION (BILL! 2.175 LZf- 

INVESTMENTS (BILL) 

3.680 

7.963 


*1993 FIGURES REFER TO MERGED COMPANY SIP 


TELECOM ITALIA - Direzione Generate - via Flaminia. 1S9 - 00196 Roma 


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THE TRIB INDEX : 112 . 71 © 

SaS l r ,,s aSSLsrssss 

Dyo.oomberg Business News. Jan. 1 . 1992 = 100 
120 



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1964 

.Avia/PacWc;^^. - 


Europe 


Awnm. wagrmng- 3Z S » 
Close 126 94 Prev 126.B0 

E9 

BS2 

Apfrn*. woghung- 37% 
Close. 114.10 Prev.: >16.10 



JASOND JASOND 


Approi waging: 26% 
Close: 97 DO Pm.. 96 39 


Latin America 


Appro* weighting: 5% 
Close- 107.80 Prev.: 106.32 



The mka tracks U.S. dollar values ot slocks in Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chfln, Denmark, Finland, 
Franco, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Maxtco, Ne th er la nds, New Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. Now York and 
London, the index a composed at (he 20 top issues n terms of marker capitalization, 
otherwise mo ten top stocks am tracked. 


Industrial Sectors 


Tim. Pray. % 

dew don chaoga 

Energy 11 £42 113.45 -Ml" Capital floods ~ H456 114.40 40.14 

(/fifties 12169 122.18 -024 BawHateriate T32.32 1316? “0.97 

Finance H3-9S T14-3S -035 Consumer Goods 104.17 104.76 -0.56 

Secvicea hq. 72 tll-63 -0.82 BtecdbneoiB 1 17.57 118-90 -1.12 

*r more information about the Index, a booklet « avadable free at charge. 

Write to Tnb Mat. 181 Avenue Charles do Gaote. 92521 N&u&y Codex, France. 

O International Herald Tribune 


Unisys 
To Slash 
Its Staff 

Mainframe Woes 
Cost 4,000 Jobs 

Compiled bv Our Staff From Dapntckct 

BLUE BELL, Pennsylvania 
— Unisys Corp. said Thursday 
it would cut about 4,000 jobs 
and take a pre-tax charge of 
S17S to S225 million in the 
fourth quarter as the company 
shifts its focus away from a 
dwindling mainframe market. 

The company, the fifth-larg- 
cst U.S. computer maker, said 
that slow sales of its large com- 
puter systems and low profits in 
its European operations con- 
tributed to “disappointing” re- 
sults for 1994, and the cost- 
cutting measures would help 
boost earnings, 

Unisys shares rose 12.5 cents, 
to $8.75, on the New York Stock 
Exchange on Thursday. 

The company lost almost $2.5 
billion from 1989 to 1991. Chair- 
man James Unruh, who took the 
helm in 1990, has reorganized 
the company and cut the work 
force by almost half. 

The latest job cuts, which rep- 
resent less than 10 percent of the 
company’s work force, will save 
at least $200 million annually by 
the end of next year, Mr. Unruh 
said. About half of the cuts will 
be outside the United States, 
Unisys said, and most will be 
focused in the hardware, or 
mainframe, units. 

Europe will see cuts of less 
than 2,000 jobs, said Martin 
Sexton, spokesman for the com- 
pany’s European operations. At 
the end of the third quarter, 
Unisys' Europe/ Africa division 
employed 7,000 people, about a 
seventh of the work force. 

At the same time, the compa- 
ny said it expected to add more 
than 2,000 jobs in its growing 
consultancy and services activi- 
ties. Mr. Unruh said the infor- 
mation-services business grew 19 
percent in 1993 and 22 percent 
in the first nine months of this 
year. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Why Apple WouldrFtBite 

Restraint on Pentium Served It Well 


By Lawrence M. Fisher 

New York Tuna Senr.rc 

NEW YORK — If there was ever any 
question which was the kinder, gentler com- 
puter company — Apple Computer Inc. or 
International Business Machines Corp. — 
their respective handlings of the recent mis- 
steps at Intel Corp. and Microsoft Corp. 
should set aside all doubt. 

IBM played pit bull, while Apple played 
pussycat. It does not necessarily mean the 
people at Apple are nicer — just that they 
have their own reasons for diploma^. 

Intel this month thought it had all but 
succeeded in putting the Pentium problem 
behind it when IBM went for the jugular. 

By publicly asserting that the Pentium 
might make a miscalculation every 20 days 
instead erf every 27.000 years, IBM all but 
forced Intel to recoosider its “we’ll tell you if 
you need a new chip” policy and offer new 
Pentiums to everybody. 

IBM, despite bring Intel’s biggest custom- 
er, plans eventually to make its Power PC 
chip a direct competitor to the Pentium. 

No sooner had Intel capitulated than Micro- 
soft announced that its Windows 95 software 
operating system would be late. 

Immediately the IBM publicist was again on 
the phone, pointing out what a blow Micro- 
soft’s delay would be to independent software 
developers — who, by the way, could case their 
pain by producing programs for the 7 million 
or so users of IBM’s alternative, OS/2. 

The latest version of OS/2, intended as a 
direct competitor to Windows and called 


Warp, was introduced this year and has sold 
about 800,000 copies so far. 

During all this, where was Apple Computer 
Inc., the other natural beneficiary of prob- 
lems at Microsoft and Intel? 

“Oh, we certainly can’t comment on our 
comped Lots,” Pam Miracle, an Apple spokes- 
woman, said when asked whether Apple was 
boosting production of its non-Intel computers 
and non-Microsoft software in anticipation of 
increased demand by worried consumers. 

Apple did, however, take advantage of the 
cover provided by Microsoft’s news to confirm 
that its own new software operating system, 
code-named Copland, would be late too. 

If Apple's reluctance to taunt seemed 
quaint alongside IBM’s brass-knuckles de- 
meanor, some industry analysts said such a 
stance served Apple's long-term interests. 

“I think Apple is basically doing the right 
thing, staying on the sidelines and not com- 
menting.” said Guy Kawasaki, a columnist 
for MacWorld magazine. 

While many analysts assigned an ulterior 
motive to IBM’s pronouncements about Intel 
and Microsoft, Apple is actually in a better 
position to benefit from any fear, uncertainty 
or doubt about Windows or ImeL 

The reason: IBM win not ship a personal 
computer with the Power PC chip inside, or a 
version of OS/2 that can run on it, until the 
middle of next year. But Apple has already 
sold nearly 1 million Power PC versions of its 
Macintosh and continues to sell these Power 
Macs as fast as it can make them. 


Banesto Sells 
50% Stake in 
Portugal Bank 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MADRID — Banco Espahol 
de Credito SA said Thursday it 
would sell its 50 percent stake in 
the Portuguese bank. Banco 
Tot la & Acores, to a Portuguese 
businessman for 153 billion es- 
cudos (5950 million). 

The buyer is the financier 
Antonio Chaxnpalimaud, who 
had bis industrial empire seized 
by Portugal's revolutionary 
government in 1974 and has 
spent the past two decades re- 
building his fortune. 

The purchase of Portugal’s 
third -largest bank ends months 
of controversy and speculation 
over Totta’s future, parked by 
the purchase of Totta shares by 
Banesto through Portuguese 
proxies in a privatization offer- 
ing that began in 1989. 

The Lisbon government, 
which wanted the bank to re- 
main Portuguese, considered 
Banesto's quiet takeover illegal 
and pressured Spain to get Ban- 
esto to sell back the stake: 

A source at Banco Santander 
SA, which owns 48.5 percent of 


Banesto, said the bank was 
pleased with the sale. 

“This is a magnificent agree- 
ment, and for Santander it rep- 
resents a rational business deci- 
sion,” he said. 

The a greem ent was initially 
well received in the market, 
where both Banesto and Santan- 
der shares rose against the tide of 
general stock weakness. Trading 
in Totta’s shares was suspended* 
cm the Lisbon bourse. 

The deal still needs to be ap- 
proved by government authori- 
ties. 

News of the deal came one 
year after Banesto lurched on 
the brink of bankruptcy, 
prompting the Bank of Spain to 
step in, subsequently selling 
Banesto to Santander in April 
for $228 billion. 

Totta had been providing as 
much as 40 percent of Banesto 
group profits. 

Santander has been selling 
most of Banesto's nondomestic 
retail banking activities but had 
sought to maintain a stake in 
Totta. 

See BANK, Page 14 


As a Boom Shakes Shanghai, Some Fear a Bust 


By Kevin Murphy 

ImemanonaJ Herald Tribune 

SHANGHAI — All across this city of 
nearly 16 million, migrant workers 
swarm over building sites, flattening 
whole blocks with only sledgehammers, 
shovels and wicker baskets to supple- 
ment their bare hands and an occasional 
bulldozer. 

Hundreds of thousands of workers 
have poured in from the countryside to 
work on these sites and the massive 
infrastructure projects and foreign- 
funded factory precincts springing up 
everywhere. 

Stores are jammed with goods and 
shoppers carrying money to bum, while 


outside, narrow streets fill with swelling 
streams of new cars. Glitzy shops tout 
investments in dozens of “exclusive” 
golf and country dubs planned for the 
hinterlands. 

Shanghai's economy has grown at an 
annual rate of more than 33 percent in 
recent years, hardly pausing despite 
Beijing's efforts to rein in the national 
economy. 

But as prosperity bundles . Shanghai 
into a new era, the* building boom has 
created worries for many of the city’s 
residents — and for foreign investors. 

Forced relocations and fears that 
there win be a property crash have sur- 
passed high inflation as this city’s most 
common preoccupations. 


Despite an inflation rate exceeding 26 
percent in China’s hugest cities, people 
enjoying their share of Shanghai's new 
wealth — from higher wages, a second 
job, speculative investments or a new 
small business — say they are better off. 

“Food prices have gone up very high 
over the last year,” said one shopkeeper 
as dotids of dust from a demolition site 
next door blew into the open-air food 
market — he will be moving soon, too. 
“But people have more money now, so 
they can still buy their vegetables.” 

But, newly rich or still poor, many 
people in the path of progress have more 
than inflation to grumble about. 

Tens of thousands of Shanghai resi- 


dents face relocation in coming months 
as the building craze turns dilapidated 
inner-city housing into office towers and 
shopping palaces at a rate that gives 
property analysts nightmares. 

An elevated highway being built 
along Chengdu Road will force 80,000 
residents to move. As in most reloca- 
tions, those moved will receive compen- 
sation, more living space and better 
amenities. But many people’s new 
homes will not be ready in lime. 

City people will generally be sent to 
far-flung, high-rise suburbs. Once there, 
an initial lack of services and Shanghai’s 

See BOOM, Page 15 


WALL STREET WATCH 




.rjr 'ill 


GATT May Not Ease Glaxo’s 


By Milt Freudenheim 

j New York Tunes Service 

H EW YORK — Glaxo Hold- 
ings PLC says a Hole-noticed 
patent measure tucked into 
the new world trade agree- 
r benefit the company. But, 
ing the fine print, analysts are 
re. 

Pharmaceutical stocks moved up 
brief!; last week after Glaxo Holdings, 
based in London, said a provision of the 
Gene al Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 
mean that the basic patent on Zantac, 
its blockbuster ulcer treatment, would be 
extended by 19 months, to July 1997. 

Gpxo’s American depository receipts 
rose (to a six-month high of $2125 on 
Dec 21 on the announcement The 
ADRs dosed Thursday at $20.50, down 
12J cents. Each ADR represents two 
ordinary shares. 

Under the trade accord, American 
patents will expire 20 years from the 
Vp Jli cation date, instead of 17 years after 
JJj patent is granted. Companies with 
pleats expiring after June 8, 1995, can 
calculate the date either way. 

[Because about half of Zantac’s $4 bO- 
iiifiin annual sales is in the United 
shies, Glaxo might expea $3 billion in 
aided sales of Zantac before low-cost 
Jneric copies could be introduced. 

1 But analysts pointed out that the Zan- 
L patents were already under attack 
Join three generic drug companies — 
Geneva Pharmaceuticals Ina, a unit of 
?iba-Geigy AG of Switzerland; Novo- 


pfaarm Ltd., based in Scarborough, On- 
tario, and Genpharm International, 
based in Mountain View, California. 

Under the new GATT rules, a generic 
company that has already made a “sub- 
stantial investment” in copying a drug 
could begin marketing during the patent 
extension period. The generic’s maker 

Evan Sturza, editor of 
Sturza’s Medical 
Investment Letter, says 
Glaxo’s shares are 
overpriced because its 
newer drugs cannot match 
Zant ac’s sales. 

would, however, have to pay “equitable 
remuneration” to Glaxo. 

Glaxo expects the definitions erf “sub- 
stantial” and “equitable” to be set by 
litigation, a spokesman said. 

Complicating the issue, Glaxo has ob- 
tained patents on two forms of Zantac. 
Only the first form faced the loss of its 
patent next year, now extended to 1997. 

But Glaxo is only selling the second 
form. Its patent runs until 2002 and was 
recently upheld by a federal court in 
North Carolina. The company argues 
fhnt the three generic companies are 
planning versions erf Zantac that should 


be excluded because they would violate 
the second patent. 

Ronald J. Stem, a pharmaceutical an- 
alyst with Furman Selz, said Glaxo’s 
GATT announcement was a tactic to 
help its position in the lawsuits. 

Evan Sturza, editor of Sturza’s Medi- 
cal Investment Letter, says Glaxo’s 
shares are overpriced. He argues that the 
company’s newer drugs for migraine 
headaches, asthma and nausea cannot 
match Zantac's blockbuster sales. 

“Until these GATT issues are sailed 
in the courts, there win be an enormous 
amount erf uncertainty” he said. Mean- 
while, he expects Zantac to lose market 
share to Prilosec, sold by Astra Merck, a 
joint venture of Astra AB of Sweden and 
Mock & Co. of the United States, and 
generic versions of Tagamet, which is 
made by SmithKline Beecham PLC. 

Zantac may also face reduced demand 
if antibiotics prove effective against He- 
licobacter pylori bacteria, recently iden- 
tified as a cause of peptic ulcers. 

But Rick Sluder, a Glaxo spokesman, 
said more than half of Zantac's sales 
were for “peptic add conditions that 
have nothing to do with H pylori.” 

On the flip side, the Glaxo announce- 
ment pushed down the stocks of some 
companies that make generic drugs. 
Some investors said the generic drug 
makers would have to wait longer before 
getting their chance to mimic Zantac and 
a host of other products that wQl soon 
lose patent protection. 


Hcralb 


|V|*K!LVJTIf)N\»* 

Safi? 


rtuiMiMi Him mi. xt« \ukk nucx «m* mr iumiiniJux n*»« 


I 


r : 






r:*v. *x. 


28,606 
$ millionaires 
get more out. 
of iht. ] 




CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 





. DM 

Stf* 3 " = 

U2.B7 miW* 

*** MBJS UWMJ 

I UH5 US8 MSU 
part* nuo 15W» 407 

ra»V UB79 1IW 

uras u * W* 
U* vm 
Gsi asm 

1 taAmsurdam. London. 

Pound; W rotwv 


Dec. 2d 

FJ». Urn Djq BJ. SJ=. W « >*■•»* 

UW HOP* — MS* vns l-KB* J-£L 

ssa mss* bxh — lews urn bjs xar 

um USW UW el«7* T.UI9 u»‘ I™ ^ 

UW 259R73 17® 030 MW UMB «« 

MSI MB* J5JBI 4.DJS ItSW «« 

BUS *SS» SUM W4US «3W !*" 

axe vaut i» mi iw "f. ^ 

UW* UW UK ws «"• 5“ 

h m Mu sw iUM ™ ?rr. 

um uw* urn um* uw ww — J* 

uw aw 7 * usn *tw» — 11171 100 

A5S3S USB Zmi IMS U1M ffiM 

um 23715* 1536 mas iwi K* 215 10331 mAa 

Maw York ondZUrten Oximes tn admr canton; Toronto 

arm dollar; •; Units at MB,- N.O.: not ovofod; NA.: not 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Swtsa French 

ooUw D-Mark Prase Stwllns Franc Yen ECU 

1 month 5*h& ’ 5-fiVk 3?W MW 5*-S» ZVfa-JVi 5 

! months flMM Ofcm 4hr4«w 2V. -2% *■ 

6 months 8M 5W-5 V» 7 W7 W. 4W414 Zfe-2Vz 

1 mar nvm SW-5% 7%* 7-7W 2SWWi 7Vh-7'.. 

Saunas.- mom UoveU Bank 

Halos tmndeaUo to IWorkmdt tmmita ot SI mttHon mMmum (oreouhmioiifi. 


Key Homy Rates 


nZL- DoUar Values 

p_.. currency Qbwbct wr* 

ogttpetl Per * omfcdroc. wbM Mm,mw 

szr — gas s ssse; s 

SS«- » a 

Seas » X£ 


Cun spe r P*r* 
S-Atr.rand 

S.KST.WM T H3S 

s«*& Kruno 7J7H 

Tolwont 2MJ 

TMInM 2LM 

Turkish Hro 377S1 
UAE cflrtom X6TI 
VepCL boUv. WJ7 


UnRad States 


3 n> »Wt i CPs 
Com m. rawer Mi dns 
MnWiTfenrrM 
Wear Trwnurr bin 
l^rsar Treasury rate 


MKMHlWi 
Con m — o r 
mrarttu m e rt walt 
S-montb MerbauK 
HMSHtmt 

u-reoreur 


. <Vi tv, 

4Vi 6 1 . 
61b 

7 *. 7V, 


IWrser Treasury eot* 

3B faivTiauui-yband 
ManV.LyndiSMar ready anet . 


Gen moan 
VoMatti Merbaak 
XMalhMamaak 


Ratos - — mm 

poly -c, o-doy mm Currency ijob 1M9 

s S :S 




9 Commf<Mui"lhm 

Honl Bunk at Canada 


LooAanlnita 
Cofl oui r 

MHUffthtertmik 

taiemhw urw i t* 

mnnrwm 


MerveetiM rate MS Sfll 

Call Money S tk 5% 

noontti mwman fc 5M 5-h 

MnaalB lal ar tiaali 6 Vi An. 

Mnaafli laMriMOk irk Wi 

lOyaarOAT LZ1 UM 

Sovran; Routors, Btoomborv, Morrill i 
Lracfc, Sank of Toky+ Comnerztmk, Crtdlt 

Lvonrxda, 


Zurich 3S2S 38115 +1-15 

London Stt« 3830S +15B 

New York 3MJ0 3811ft +-2M 

yji dottors nor ounce. London vf tided fix- 
laos;ZuriOi Odd Now Ydrft cPOWnoandctos- 
tag prices; New York Goman ! February. ) 
Seureo: Reutarx 


Our recent reader survey revealed some startling facts about our readers, not 
least your wealth. On average your household investments are valued at a most 
impressive US$ 886,400.* 

You’re probably among the majority of readers who value our regular 
Saturday Money Report and our concise yet comprehensive editorial style.t 
- Ample evidence, we dunk, that our pages are a rich vein for both you and 
the leading financial services companies who advertise with us. 

‘ For summaries of the surveys from which these facts are taken, please call, 
in Europe, James McLeod on (33-1) 46 37 .93 8.1; in Asia, Andrew Thomas on 
(65) 223 6478; in die Americas, Rich^d Ijynch on (2 1 2) 752 3890. 


StiN/vt: * Reader Surrey V?. * Reader Sdtitfatthp Survey '94. 


international herald 


TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30. 


1994 


Page 14 



MARKET DIARY 


High- Tech Shares 
Star on Wall Street 


CampM ty Our Staff From Dispatches 
NEW YORK -US. stocks 
slipped on Thursday but Intel 
led a rally in technology stocks, 
which overcame concern about 
interest rates and Mexico s fi- 
nancial crisis. . 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
eraged held wit hin a narrow 

U^. Stocks \ 


Hewlett-Packard rose 1% to 

10214 after Smith Barney said 
upgraded its rating. Among the 
other leading technology issues* 
3Com climbed 2 3/16 to 53 
1/16 Lotus Development rose 
1^ to 4114. and Adobe Systems 
rose to 30. 

Auto stocks rose after a re- 
port that U.S. vehicle produc- 
tion was expected to exceed Ja- 
pan’s output every year thoup 
the end of the decade. G 


Eg “tslm 6-06 pomls 

“Clearly people are expecting % u> 27% and Chrysler jumped 
the technology slocks to be the \\& to 49%. 
leader in 1995,” said Ric Dillon Amgen rose U4 to 59% after 
of Dillon Capital Management. ^ company said the U.S. Food 
“A handful of technology and Drug Administration ap- 
ciocks are doing their own thing pr0 ved its factory in Juncos, 
wSe t^ Dow Socks are cooLng Puerto Rico. Approval means 
said Trade Latimer of Fer- Amgen can take advantage of 
S«on, Andrews & Associates. ^ breaks given to companies 
8 Declining, stocks nearly operating in Puerto Rico. 

earners on the Big Another biotechnology com- 

drd^vhS?^50.56 million pan y, Chiron rose % to 80% 
SSL traded hands, up slightly after the waiting period for pos- 
M 3 52 milfion on able UJS. antitrust action ex- 
wSiesdav pired auuoakm 0ba ' 

W fmel Md other computer Geigy’s offer to greaUy mcrease 

shares rose after an analyst at its stake m the company. 
?£5lTS3flSd his esti- Offsetting the gams was con- 
, f jT te r s 1995 earning s, tinning concern about mstabd- 
Vk o MCitTughSl ity in Mexico, America s tfuixi- 

parmer. afurihe 

tie most heavily traded share peso devaluadm. 


Dally dosings of the 
Dow JonesTndustrial average 



d J 
1994 


A S O N D 


Indus 

Trans 

Util 

C-jmD 


Open 

wa*.in84T.M 383142 3833J3 
M36.63 1AA5.J5 10137 t*44ft + 9.S3 
IBlJi 181 95 111.12 18126 -4M 
im»jo 12/222124828 271.1* 


Standard & Poor’s Indexes 


Industrials 

Tronsp. 

utilities 
Finance 
SPSOD 
5P 100 


High low Owe W 
54846 549J0 + M* 
349.45 347.12 349.53 +]•» 
1S1JBS 15875 

4146 4148 41 St + WM 
46141 460S& 481.M 
431 JA cast 43088 + 843 


CUne 

Bid 

ALUMINU M {Hten ortxiel 

ESS 0 ” m "SE&f’wsxOO 1W5JD 1936ft 
%ZL*rl I2mJ» IM tmoo 1966* 
COPPER CATHODES IHW Stn*l 
Do, * ar * per,, Sffi«^ KlJJB 301480 301SOO 

SUrt sss sss s® *•» 

LEAD 

Damn per mtfrictod 
Seat a«9j00 mobs 

Forward <4880 UtM 

NICKE L 

£S“2 ESS 


Mar 
jom 
ji at 
AM 

oS n!|: jfT. 

Nov N.T. Ji 

Bee 14W* loirs 

Est voMiw: 15381 . 


15125 +125 
IrtM +1.75 



M3J0 

662X0 


64X50 

463JOO 


NYSE Indexes 


Camowite 

Induatriots 

TrtfflP. 

utility 

Finance 


High Low Lust On. 

25124 2S0.99 25196 -0.15 
319JS 31810 3TBJ2 + 836 
220.98 21928 M887 *1*5 
200.11 19922 19929 -874 
194.27 195,65 19L0B -023 


NASDAQ Indexes 


Law Lust Chi*. 


IHT 


NYSE Most Actives 


TaiMex 
OtdaCE 
RJRNab 
SCEGP 
Toy HU 

ABarck 

Kmart 

YPFSoe 

GnMotr 


VoL MW. 
106058 43W 
36315 33V. 
34634 M i 
30126 15 
29493 31V. 
27703 229. 
27445 13* 

25848 21 W 
24480 42V. 


RJRNhpfC MOM 6'4 

wauvuwt zgn *]* 
aitawp 21277 41> 

IBM 

GTrtKBa 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


on the Nasdaq. 


(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Dollar Gains Ground 
On Rate Expectations 


MQ 

NcxMCin 

BayMtws 

Navel 

asen 3 

Acclaim 

SoecTch 

Oracle 

Aurtex 

undue 

Mksfls 

PriceCst 

FHBuTlt 

ReaaRt 


Compiled b» Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
’rose against other major curren- 
cies Thursday on speculanon 
that Wednesday’s slide had 
been overdone, considering the 
likelihood of a rise in U.S. inter- 
est rates. 

“The dollar is recovering to- 
day because it was dramatically 
overdone yesterday,” said Huai 
Taylor of Reyn wood Trading 

Foreign Exchange 

Coro. Many traders and analysts 
predicted the Federal Open 
Market Committee, the pobcy : 


later denied by the U.S. Trea- 
sury, that Mexico was drawing 
on a $6 billion line of credit to 
support the peso. 

But the Treasury confirmed 
late Wednesday that discus- 
sions were under way on “exter- 
nal support for Mexico” to help 
stabilize its economy. 

The peso did not have much 
effect on the dollar’s value 
Thursday, traders said. 

“The Mexican situation sta- 
bilized yesterday” said Earl 
Johnson, an analyst at Harris 
Trust & Savings Bank in Chica- 
go. “I think the worst is over." 

A gains t major European cur- 
rencies, the dollar rose to 5 35 1 5 


19706 51* 
17861 74V, 
17747 IB* 


LOW 
4 P.4 

33 

5Vi 

141k 
30* 
22* 
12* 
20* 
41* 
»Va 
21 ta 
40* 
50* 
73 
17* 


\ Ml 

42V, 

33* 

5* 

14* 

30* 

22 * 

13 

21 ■/. 
42* 
6* 
21 ’A 

41*. 

51* 

74* 

17* 


05 


-V» 

— vn 


>i* 
-Vs 
* 1* 


Composrfa 

Industrials 

Banks 

Insurance 

Finance 

TranS*. 


74828 74104 74828 
747.99 74181 747.99 
tmj/t 689-47 69229 
92323 915.73 91927 
B57J7 BSM7 85797 
65131 64888 <5321 


+ 5.92 
+ 106 
+ 2.99 
+222 
+ 185 

-448 


Soot 

Forward 

Dollcnrs per iMtrtcjMi^ bbkod 593520 

ZIHCrtPCcfal HI?A SfodQl 

„^o 

Forward 


miuo WToio mojoo noaoo 


Sumo \wm 11 S 00 115100 


NT lt§25 + 125 
14175 l**- 75 + ,l2S 
SS w. 91496 


uXTattSE ““s* 

*Ss®«sess^Ss»5f- 1 




FOB 

Mar 

Apr 

MOV 

Jan 

Jhr 

AM 


DM 

Mm 


1156 

1156 

1&S 

1157 
1162 
1161 
N.T. 
K.T. 
N.T. 
N.T. 
N.T. 


11*0 

1629 

1623 

1629 

1152 

16*3 

itn 

K.T. 

N.T. 

N.r. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


1140 

16*0 

IlO 

1149 

lig 

16*3 

1161 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


11*2 UIKh, 
16*0 —023 
16*2 UIK5L 
1145 -OM 
1+45 —007 
16*3 -028 

itS —0.10 

It CT —0.10 
16*0 —0.10 
1665 -MO 
1187 —0.10 
1668 —HO 


^ C “ niy0ne 


e Counvyonesijp ^ w hose t-alue turn- 
mies six rimes this year. 


EAVOMT^JWI*' OPWW-157-2® 


Rnandal 


AMEX Stock Index 


Hon low Lost a«o. 
431*4 429.27 43124 +1.74 


IflQtl 

j!£ nM nx 

SOT 91*< 91-33 

DM 91» 

mw SIS 

S S 


LOW OOM PWM 


9057 

9077 

9079 

9020 

N.T. 


9039 

N.T. 

N.T. 


9039 

N.T. 

N.T. 


9253 

9123 

9123 

91-04 

9C90 

9080 

9039 

90J0 

9021 

9039 

9078 

9039 


Dow Jones Bond Average 


20 Bonds 
10 Utilities 
10 industrials 


Clow ere 

9326 —03° 

8925 —02* 

9828 —0.11 


VaL Mali 
365B0 64V, 
23844 18* 
22689 14* 
21929 30* 
21 HO 17* 
19257 35* 
17761 14* 
17586 IVi, 
16544 49* 
14036 TVs 
14846 * 

14615 61* 
14304 13* 
13893 5* 
12888 If 


LOW 

63* 

18 

13* 

38* 

17* 

34* 

14 

'Vu 

43* 

Vm 

* 

60* 

12 * 

4* 

17* 


Last Clra. 

64* + !’■ 

18* — * 
14* * * 

29* 

17* 

35* 

14»« 

1 

45 V. 

"'u 
=*1 
4TVu 
13* 

4* 

IB* 


NYSE Diary 


Est volume: 21253. Onen hit.: 375,174. 
3*»ONTH EUHODOLLAH5 (UFFE) 

Si miBloa-PtioMfOP^ 

Mor M W7 

Jon N.T. N.T. 

sen 


-0.13 

— 0.14 
— 015 
-OV 

— 0.11 

— 0.11 

— MB 

-an 

-aw 

-0.14 

— 0.10 

— 0.10 


H|g|| 

FT5E1 W<L1 FFE1 
OS per Index PMn 

•6m* 31122 

N.T. 
31422 


Stock Indexes 

m cw cnome 


Jun 


30752 

N-T. 

31422 


30772 

30902 

31132 


-412 
—402 
— 300 


9179 

N.T. H.T. 71.» 

« N.T. N.T. ng 

EsL volume: 200 open Ini.: 2276. 
*mowj^uto^rioc , . | eebi 

Dmi mOBon-Ptief INwd 

9648 908 908 


n 1+4 

—028 
-028 
— 0.10 


.Vi 

- * 

+ , <‘B 
+ 1 
— Vl4 
+ »= 


Advanced 
DddmM 
unctumaed 
Taiai issues 
New mans 
New Laws 


1155 

1097 

729 

2981 

31 

84 


879 

1315 

736 

2950 

34 

107 


Mar 

Jan 

Sea 

Dec 

Mar 

Joe 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 

Sea 


AMEX Diary 


AMEX Moat Actives 


USBtosd 

VIocvtI 

IntoriHB 

XO. Ltd 

Amdnl 

VlacB 

SwnLWc 

RovatOo 

EchoBoV 

IvaxCP 


VaL Mgh 
17469 3 Vii 
126S2 1* 
9022 7* 
7367 'V., 
4AM U* 
5389 40* 
5310 2* 
5053 3V„ 
4210 11* 
3945 18* 


Low 

2* 

1* 

6 * 

* 

10 * 

40* 

r/it 

37i, 

10* 

18* 


Last 

3Vu 

1* 

7 

* 

II 

40* 

2 * 

JV„ 

10 * 

IB* 


CM. 

-+11 


— * 
— * 
+ * 


Advanced 
DecTmed 
Uncnanoed 
Tokfl issues 
NewHhjhs 
New Laws 


278 

2S4 

271 

B33 

10 

41 


219 

350 

250 

819 

10 

43 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Uncnaroed 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


1774 

1486 

1871 

5131 

96 

142 


1403 

1858 

1873 

5114 

W 

150 


Spot Commodltiea 


Market Sales 


Commodity 
Aluminum. Ih 
Copper electrolytic. ID 
I iron FOB, ton 


94.10 

93J0 

9X33 

V3JM 

•rut 

9254 

9243 

9232 

9225 

92.18 

9214 


93.99 

9U1 

9X24 

9225 

92A8 

9251 

9239 

9228 

9224 

9218 

9214 


9299 

9241 

9224 

9296 

9249 

9251 

9239 

9238 

19220 

9214 

9210 


Est volume: 42199. Open ml.: 461,541. 


— 027 

— 0-10 
—aio 

— aio 
—am 
—an 

— 006 
— 007 

—aw 

—aw 

-am 

—010 


5 S K 

6 

194U0 193320 


189200 -B« 

190SJJ0 '31-S 

mijs 

192050 -»» 

190150 

-93000 -3200 

Bd. v#J£r*SMt- Open Wt.: tBSO. 

Maltt. Associated. Press. 

London I ntt F to on 
Inn petro/eam Exchange. 


Humming 

3 SSSSS&SSG&& 


^unemplojinent 



Jun 


Dividends 


J-MOWTH PIBORJMATIF1 
FF9 mllaon -fits oflBOget 


Per And Ree Pav 
IRREGULAR 

vn 

OOTprax amount per snore. 

STOCK SPLIT 

Ftrsl Franklhi 2 for 1 spot 

INCREASED 


28 12-30 
J9 1-18 


1-10 

2-1 


Sep 


9119 

9289 

9265 

9247 

9229 

9219 

9213 

9209 


9280 

9259 

9241 

9224 

9215 

9201 

9202 


9213 

9283 

9263 

9242 

9226 

9216 

9208 

9201 


—007 
—006 
UtiCh. 
—005 
— 002 
HH3 

— 0J0S 

— 002 


100-15 —1-31 
99-15 —1-31 

t.: mow. 


Est volume: 25458. Open Int: 196596. 

jan V. 

Eat. votomr: 28407. Open 

OERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND <LIFFEI 

DM 258098 -P» Of 1««* -an n9 r 
89-70 8075 UOO — 0» 

_ »LT. N.T. E&1B — 105 

Est. volume: 50009. Open Int.: W7.T74. 
18-YEAR FRENCH COV. BONDS (MATIF7 
E^‘^lj|l™nW 11844 -0J4 

E i n =| 

Dec N.T. N.T. N.T. Unch. 

EsL volume: 53487. Open Int: 136059. 


Not! Senrtoe j.nd O 

TedmaJvalaCorp S 

CORRECTION 

JSSSSwnSto dote on’kiriw pSSent. M 

SPECIAL 

Find Franklin - - 12S 1-17 

INITIAL 

Mo^PKMtdnBn : m rtx lw 

REGULAR 

MO V27 


Jon 



Industrials 

Mob Low Lost Settle are 

u^lMnOT metric tan+ats ef ^ 

Jan 14675 14475 14675 W6-50 +200 

Ml 14975 14750 149J0 V49-H YtfS, 

MV 15175 14975 151 JO 151 JO +100 

Apr 15200 


AmW Bn*! 

Commanwtlti Svax 

Bk 

Firm Franklin 
KJnrxvd Inv 
Now York Bo> 

PSB Hohfina* 

Smart A Final 
WavneS&L 


06 

.10 

.125 

025 

70 

08 

05 

.18 


1-3 

1-6 

1-15 

V12 

1-11 

M 

1-11 


{ffiififfv/ . SMutB ^^V^enil-agnual 


1-17 

1-17 

1-31 

1-26 

1-26 

1-27 

1-26 

I m- 


Cenaio oflerugs of secnrtlres. nnaacial 
services or inwess m real escae prABjhrfta 
Gil newspaper are b« mtoriwl in cernrin 
jorisdctiOTS in wtneb die Imaiuiioaal Roald 
■tTibune is <finribwed, indwtais ibe United 
Stales of America, and do mn coasiiinte 
offerings of securities, sorites w iiueiBBa 
ibese ]oris<&ciraas. Tfce tmemarional Herald 
Tribune assumes no nsponsibiKiy whanoow 


W ? CD ^nTTfter a sUght 0.1 percent ■ - d ^ num ber of 

“■ by 3 , 000 , to 
J?^cari»s for -pg ^, re ihan erasing a gam of 
322,000, in the v,eeK ^ u 

2,000 the r* , heed _Marietta ; 
Pentagon Gears L®® ^ u.s. Defense 

WAS^GTON (CombmedD^ tc propo sedmagerof 

Sn MaricttaCorp. .0 aeate the worlds 

theSlObillion deal, ^mga^ mus( QOW be approvedby 
that might have blocked it. ® JJd shareholders of the JW) 
the Federal Trade Commission aim (Reuters, AB) 

Pm-cto Pa«^ 

WASHINGTON NesU6 Food Co.’s acquisition _ '1 

said Thursday it ifs Mmpetition between the nyo 
of Alpo PetFoods would end u.:>. 

bis cal food makers. f xi«iiA Food, the Glendale, 

\he dedson cl^xed the to buy .AJpoforJSW 

C^oniiauimofSwi^lMdsNes whjch is owned by 

million. Alpo is a subsidiary of rnsoui. , ^ 

Grand Metropolitan PLC. , - 

II S Has 7 th-BSdiestGNP Per Head .- 

U.S. nag i Ut advanced o as 

nation, the Worhi 

4e^«S& «*MS5jre N 'M5SS3 

rose to $24,750 in 1993 from $23,830 m 199 +^j ^ 

all goods and services produced by a country 

capital worldwide. . * i n Q f the World Barik 

The data, contained m the 27 A «^uon wea ithiest 

Atlas, dicrwed that Switzerland L^tembourg was in 

nation, with a per cmtaGNP of Sweden, 

second place, followed by Japan, ftajt 
then the United States, which was followed by Iceland. 

Head oi Rodkefdler Center Resigns 

NEW YORK (Reuters) — Rockefeller Crater ^ 

said Thursday that Claude Ballard Jr. bad s * e Pf^ elec J^ to 
rhairman and director and Peter Lmneman had 
^oc^dhim. Mr. Linneman has been a director of the company 

since 1993. 


BANK: Portuguese Financier Buys Banesto’s 50% Stake in Banco Totta 


jvuub.»» — — - - - rencies, meaouarruac iu 

making arm of the U^S. ^tral Frcnch francs from 5.3370 and 
Knnir wrMild raise short-term m «,«, c. Fmm 


Kan if, would raise short- 
terest rates when it meets Jan. 
31. Increased interest rates gen- 
erally strengthen a currency. 

The dollar rose to 1.5528 
Deutsche marks from 1.5450 
DM on Wednesday, and to 
99.65 yen from 99 25 yen. 

The dollar dropped more 
than three pfennig against the 
mark Wednesday on rumors, 


to 1.3121 Swiss francs from 
1.3040. 

The pound fell to $1-5599 
from $1.5670. 

The Spanish peseta fell to a 
new low against the marie amid 
fresh allegations of government 
involvement in 1980s “death- 
squad” operations against 
Basque separatists. (Page 15) 

( Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Continued from Page 13 

“It seems Banes to has earned 
a huge premium, compared 
with the market price of Totta, 
said Mariano Colmenar, an an- 
alyst with Barclays de Zoete 
Wedd in Madrid. 

Banesto's stake in Totta was 
built up by the Spanish bank’s 
former president, Mario Conde, 
who took Banesto to the edge of 
collapse a year ago. . 

Mr. Conde is now m a Ma- 


drid prison facing charges of Banro Santondn .bought Ban- 
ft-nurf esto it immediately came under 

Banesto had built a direct pressure from the Portuguese 
stake of 25 percent in Totta and authorities to return the bank to 
controlled 25percent indirectly. Portuguese hands. 

Mr. Champalrmaud, the rich- 
est man in Portugal and now its 
most important banker, agreed 


The total stake violated Portu- 
guese banking regulations, 

S°“r4°3 STS » pay for the Totla stabs in 
percent of Portuguese banks. seven payments over three years. 
The size of Banesto’s equity Analysts estimated that the 
; not revealed until the Bank purchase worked out to 6,120 


W3S BUI ICYMIWi UUU 1 uav r- ; , -haM 

of Spain's intervention. After escudos a share. Totta shares 


closed at 3,484 escudos 
Wednesday. Analysts estimated 
that Banesto stood to make be- 
tween 31 billion pesetas (S234 
million) and 52 billion pesetas, 
depending on how it accounted 
for the delay in payments. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg, AFX.) 


Electric Utilities’ Debt Downgraded 

dectric utilities on fears that impending competition 


omia 


See our 

Business Message Center 

every Wednesday 


the debt of Pacific Gas & Bcctricd* 
San Di«o^&Hectric Co.; and Scecorp, the parent ra^pany 
ofSouSera California Edison. The lower ratings will make it 
more expensive for the companies to borrow money. 

For the Record 

Kadi n* Kerry Food Stores Inc. said it had completed its debt 
resmirairingand emerged from Chapter 11 bankn^pro^- 
tionasa pubUc company. (JSioomoergj 




II. S. FUTURES 


Via Anoeiaiwl Prew 


Dot. 29 


AgMn Frana Pratw 


Dm. 29 


Amsterdam 

6030 6090 
34J0 3430 
111 111JD 
5370 5370 

32.90 33 


ABM AmroHld 
ACF HaWhlS 
Aaaan 
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AKZO Nobel 

Bots-Wessanm 

CSM 

DSM 

Elsevier 

Fakker 

FortlsAMEV 

OW-BTOcadM 

HBG w 

Hel iwfcen 
Hooaavera 
Huntar DowbIos 
IHC Cakmd 
inter Mueller 
Inn Nodofland 
KLM 
KMP BT 
KPN 
Nedllovd 
Oce Grinton 
Pakhoed 
Philips 
Polya ram 
Rrteco 
Radamca 
Rollnco 
Boren to 
Raval Dutch 
Stork 
Unilever 
van Ommeren 
VNU 


6020 67jM 
137.90 138 

18.10 17 JO 
11J0 12.10 
7370 7180 
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268 263J0 
261 JO 261.90 
7080 70W 
7870 79 

4370 43 JO 
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Nokia 

Pahlola 

Reaota 

Stockmann 


Helsinki 

82 1 
4070 4070 
157 161 
653 S49 
129 129 

137 lfl 
698 6?6 

65 60 

8SJ0 8540 
243 2<2 

: 184648 


rar- 




1681 


Brussels 

7600 7600 
4780 4800 
2515 2490 
4310 4360 
22600 22700 
12075 12050 


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Borco 
BBL _ 

Bekaert 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

CoUuerlll 

Cotmaa 

cairuvt 

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Elect rafaH 
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Fortls AG 
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Gevoert 

Gtoverbel 

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Kredlettxmk 

Mosm 

Petroflna 

Pcw er iln 

Rectwe! 

RavaieBetoe 

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1990 1980 
199 Ml 
1034 1040 
7360 7500 
1286 1290 
5700 5720 
2B30 2840 
2670 2700 

13SK ££! 

3780 3WI 
1490 1490 
4350 44M 
2B2D 2810 
6670 6730 
N.A. 1352 
94« HS 
2900 29M 
450 450 

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Satina 

?2«Sfld«1o 

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UCB 

Union Mlnlere 
Wagons uts 


Hong Kong 

a, Cfr-t Asia saw 31 JO 

Catlwv fticfflc law 11-ID 

Cheung Kona 3140 3170 

China Light Pvrr M 
Dairy .Farm IM1 6™ 

Hong Luna Dev 11 11.20 

BS 

Till Isis 

HKReSMvTnHt 13.10 13-ID 
HSBC Holdup B3.™ B42S 
HKSnangtttts w » 
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!SSSeMoth. 5550 56 

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Mandarin OtlOTt 
(VUramar Hotel 
New World Dev 

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Wharf Hold 
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541 
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178 
697 
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Mr ts 

issr i4 

irnmo l«jo 

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LlavdsBank SSI 

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Natwest _ 8.14 

NthWrt Water 5^1 

SMS, 

Prudential 3-i| 

Rank On , *.]2 

Rocklti Cal 
Red land 6M 

Read Inti 7J6 

Reutern 471 

RMC Group *4S 

Rolls Rovce 1^ 

Raitimn (unit) 6B 

Roval3cot 371 

RTZ ^ 

Samsburv 

Scot Newcca 5.11 

Scot Power 35j 

Sears 

Severn Trent if 

SMI a 

SMe 56 

Smith Nephew ] J 

Smith Kline B 4J 

Smith IWHI 47 

Sun Alliance 27 

Tote 5 Lvle *2 

Tcsca 24 

ThS.EMI I0J 

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TSB Group ,13 

Unilever iiJ 

Utd Biscuits 3- 

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WhllDread 5J 

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CdnTIreA 

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Gt-West Llfeoa 22* 


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Cora 
FUil 
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Royal BkCdn .__ 

Sean Canada Inc 
ShellCda A 
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stefco A 
Trllon Flnl A 


Skig Airlines tarn 13.90 
Sing Bus Svc 
Sins Land 
Sing Pellm 
Sing Press fern 
Sing SWpbhto 
Sing Teleeomm 
Straits Steam 
Straits Trading 
Tot Lee Bank 

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2740 27 JO 
245 245 
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835 B1C 

4.10 BNP 
5.12 BOUYOIM 
353 Danone 

1.10 Carrefour 
542 CC.F. 

7JB5 Cerue 
5J8 Owrgeurs _ 

1J3 ciments Prone 

2.99 Euro Disney 
US Gea Eaux 
UP Havas 

1030 I metal „„ 

224 Lntaroe Cappee 380-20 
2J4 Ltorand .6610 

1143 Lyon. Eaux 
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23860 25870 
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665 672 

249 2S37H 
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764 779 

223 2243 
212 215 

88 8970 
11*4 1170 
23170 219 

437J0 4« 

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S-E Bonken AF 
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Skcmska BF 
SKF BF 
Store AF 
Trelleborg BF 
VoIvd BF 


Shlmazu _ 
ShlnelswCtiem 

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Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo.Owm 
5uml Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 

TaiwH Coro 

TakedaChem 

TDK 

TelMn „ , 

Tokyo Atari iw 

Tokvo Elec Pw 
Topean Printing 
Torav ind. 
Toshiba 
Toyota _ 
Yamalchl Sec 
a: * 70a 

!&■ 


701 701 
1990 WO 

5630 522 

1890 1B70 
5S9 5TO 
860 860 
3!9 316 

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1230 

2760 2770 

13» 1M" 

722 725 

715 7M 
TWO 2070 
750 751 


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Htah Law 


open Wan low 


cane Os OpJrt 


Toronto 


tSSSff!St= 


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26+J0268J0 
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1IBJ0 I1B 
116U4J0 
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126 128 
T7OJ0168J0 
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44150 442 | 

IDS 108 
139 13530 
184375 


Sydney 

945 «4D 
471 4J1 
19.90 20.06 
345 3.46 


13075 13150 
152KI 152M 
10400 1IM00 
9570 9640 
24350 24425 
2465 2475 
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AECI »■» 

AltOdl. 

Analo Amer 
Barlows 
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Frankfurt 

15070 


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151 

285 285 
2450 2502 
627 623 
700 705 

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IBM IKS 
5360 5520 
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1519 1510 
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174J0 177 

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249 JO 251.--' 
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26180 24640 
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139.50 14180 
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Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP 

BoISoInvine 
Coles Mver 
Camaico 
CRA 
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Nat Aust Bank 

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Pac Dunlop 
pioneer inVI 
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Publisho Brdcstg 

OCT Resources 

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1.16 1.17 
1084 10J3 

1J5 185 

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346 343 
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Brit Steel 
Brn Telecom 
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Codhunr sen 

Condon 
Cools Vlyella 
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158 


432 

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1585 1599 
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1100 1070 

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2950 297gm^5 
1235 127B Varh) 

11 
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3745 5 , ^2 

5845 59B 
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4380 4400 
12900 13270 
1190 TIM 
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16295 163« 

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Poranopanema 

Petrabras 
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Asanl Chemical 
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Bank ol Tokyo 
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Daiwa House . 
DalwO Securities 
Fanuc 
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FlHITJU 

Hitachi 
Hitachi cable 
Hondo 
Ito Yokotto 
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Japan Airlines 
Kallma 
Konsoi Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 

Kvocera , „ 
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Matsu EMC Wlis 

Mitsubishi Bk 
Mltsito Otemlcal 
Mltaittsh ElK 
Mitsubishi Hev 
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Mitsui imdCo 
MIHUI Marine 
Mltsukashl 
Mitsumi 
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NGK Insutotors 
Nlkko Securities 
Nippon Kw«*o 
NlpnenOli 
Nippon Slael 
Nippon vusen 
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Olympus Optical 
Pioneer 
Ricoh i=i 
Sanyo Elec 
Sticra 


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1710 1710 
1270 1280 
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1420 1410 
1430 1450 
6650 6670 
2210 2150 
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822 835 

IBM 1770 
5300 5290 
707 730 

697 706 
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2390 2380 
414 412 

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COO 896 
716 717 

7400 7420 
1630 1610 

loio ion 

2440 2430 
551 566 
696 695 

757 750 
1310 1300 

845 847 

756 753 

1060 1050 
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1010 1Q0Q 
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970 970 

669 667 

373 372 

650 668 

817 002 

3070 2050 
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2600 2430 
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AMtfei Price 
Air Canada 
Alberta EnoraY 
Alcan Aluminum 
Amer Barrie* 

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BCE 

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CISC 

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Cdn OcrtdPet 

Cdn Pacific 

Cascades Paper 
comlneo _ 

Consumers Gas 
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Daman ind B 
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Fletcher Choir A 
Franca Nevada 
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Hondo Gold 
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imperial Oil 
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L aewen Group 
London insurGP 
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Noranda Forest 
Norcen Energy 
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Placer Dome 
Potash Cora Seek 47* 47* 
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Renaissance Env 27* n* 


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9,276 Weds tote JI 407 

wed's open M 189J57 off 1310 
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1077 MOT « 1311 JgJ l» 

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1225JUI95 ITO ITO 13*6 

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1 290 OK 95 
1350 Mar 96 
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1 445 Sep 96 1 479 w* 1*» 

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417 
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5.94 Nov 96 4J1 _401* 401 
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159 30 Mar 91 161.70 161.98 160.10 J®J0 — 1. JO 3X*K 
16U0Mcy» 16ito 1*5-50 J6400 1MJ0 -jJO 17,177 


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207 JO 
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170J0AU09S 1 71 JO 171 JO 170JB JMM 
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SOYBEAN OIL 


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-1.30 3JB3 
— 1J0 5^ 
-0.90 4235 

56 


22.45 Jen 9S 2920 29 JO 29.11 

rmtSun 27.95 asx 

22J5MOV *5 26J0 26ta 
3276 Jll! 95 2fM «« 

22.73 Auu 95 ZSJ5 25.55 
22.75 Sep 93 2115 BJS 

227500 95 3495 2495 

2435 DOT 95 2450 7457 

SUJonto 3450 24K 

MOT 96 2450 24» 

uups 2X000 Meditate 38777 
SSrwnlN 114463 Off 756 


29 JH 
38J0 
3805 
37 JS 
27 JO 
2570 
25JS 
2405 
2485 


2778 

3435 

35J0 

2SJ0 

3450 

2455 

200 

2430 

24M 


2825 

2476 

24*1 

35-50 

3422 

2478 

24J3 

2420 

2420 


‘046 20J66 
+ 075 45J33 
• lUM 21 

1X091 
-om 2 jja 
+ 0J06 2,937 
— (222 42S 
-0.15 5J88 
116 


nMMr» 112J0 112S W* 111* 
iSS WJOMcvM 11410 116J5 11XM 114* 

IN 00 1QQ-50 JuJ 95 lldJO 1T7JD 11W !”■* 

mSS iSa»s «m» 12US «** ft! 

139.00 1»J0NW« 

12920 10550 Jan 96 [ft,? 

130-30 17425MCT-W ’ft! 

12400 iaUMMay 96 1*400 

Esf.site NA. Wed 1 ! talM 5J37 
Wed’S open Ira 26J19 off 738 


13* JO 
138*0 
13830 
133.50 
III JO 
13400 
12570 
13000 
121 JO 
115JD 
11575 
11170 
11X30 
109 JO 
10730 
105-35 
11X95 


—0.15 2JM 
*030 78* 

+ 0.15 X.123 
+815 891 

+815 4JS5 
0J5 


195 


RtoAtoom 
Seagram Co 
5 tone Consold 
Talisman Env 
Tcicglabe 
Telui 
Thomson 
TorDom Bank 
Traraalta . 
TransCda Pipe 
Utd Dominion 
UtdWcsIfaume 
Westeaasl Env 
weston 

Xerox Canada B 


26* 36* 
42 41K 
16* 17 

23* 23* 
18* 18% 
15* 15U 
17* l«h 
2116 Zl* 

14* 14V* 

17* TT* 
27 36*. 
11 * 11 * 
22 * 2 » 
42* 42 

45* 45* 


^rgSs 1 ^,^ 

Zurich 

Ad la Inti 8 218 218 

AUtsuUsc B neyy 460 6M 
BBCBrwnBOvB 1127 11M 


Ciba Getoy B 
cs Koldtoas B 
Elektran B 
FMherB 
intenUscouni B 
ielmoll & 

Landis Gvr R 
Maevenalck B 
Nestle R 

Ocfllk. Buehrie R 
PoraearHida 
Roche Hdo PC 
Sotra Republic 
Sandra B 
Schindler B 
Sul ser PC o 
Survemonce B 
Swiss BnkCorpB 
Swiss Rehwur R 
Swissair R 
UBSB 

WlntortlWf B 
Zurich AssB 
I5BC mde*: 

1 prenaus : 934J7 


783 793 

560 564 

366 354 
1530 1570 

’IS 

730 730 

515 2S8 

470 4 W 

1247 I960 
130 110 

1470 1470 
6300 *350 
103 ID 
692 702 

7750 7420 

898 888 

IBID 1815 
363 364 

789 793 

770 775 
1086 1114 
684 700 

1250 129* 


Livestock 

SSSS -S-SS-sTls ss 

I lllllll 

uk 6155 Dec 95 65.15 

6tloSb94 46.15 


6472 

65.35 

6415 


*4 ITT 

6X05 


6X25 

6415 


7187 
72JQ 
njs 
71 JS 
7870 
7895 

IJ53 


5X58 
72J2 
71 JO 
71 JO 
7857 
7880 


7177 
7162 
71 JD 
71 J5 
7870 
7895 
7880 


m’WsTto wed-s-mte 7JW 

78I5MOTM na 

49.95 ACT 95 OM 
69 JO Mar 95 71 JS 
69J5AUBJB 71 JO 
IX7J°Cf95 
69J0NOV95 7895 
69J05«J» _ 

nsate 13«N wetfLSDte 

Wetfsaoenini 9J3l up 349 

ss? wn 

48MJun9S 6425 
4865 JUI« ftW 
40J0AUB95 4160 
5jOOd« 41 JD 
MOM'S 
JlJBFeOW 

Mir 96 43J0 


8895 
0815 
7X90 
7X30 
7105 
7890 
8800 
71 JO 


5880 
4880 
67 JO 
4500 
4420 
63-50 
4405 
4X30 


+007 32,796 
*870 33JS1 
+0.13 4071 
-OJB 

*0.10 IJ74 
.OJB TO 
■805 13 


-0.U X725 
-410 4330 
— 0JBS U14 
—885 UBS 
3X1 

*810 56 

♦ 810 » 

to 


Metals 

7100 Fed M 1MJ0 Iftft ’ftS 

Jffisss 35 155 155 155 

74B5MOV 95 131. 138ffl U1JS 

IkS 155 i55 |gs -m 3J39 

’toJO&So? 13800 12800 12800 1J9.95 -8M X136 

’SSodSm 11410 11410 11400 111M -005 1702 

jn*DirviM 11L4J — U.I5 

in* nun H87S iftTo -ok 

107.00 May 96 ZJS 

iSfsSOTM ^ 

'l«J5*W« _ "AW -0A5 

Ed. sate 5J00 Wads, late MO 
wetfiooenW MJ39 VP 16 

9^5^^ "-it «« -w 

SA 6925 m» % 

6180 May 95 *99.5 StoB 4KO «W 
620JJUI9S 50X0 n*j> mo sjl; 

477J5CP95 

485 0 Dec 95 5220 52X0 5380 CT.l 

51 *0 Jan 94 

6480 Mar 96 S5 

499JM»N SS 

S380Jul9* JgJ —IT, 

jjUMIH 5SXS — 14 

8&BS.W sZ&'TTJ 7 ** 

«J0 390X0 Apr 95 43250 42SJ0 419JD 0800 — 1J0 I9JJ9 
439.00 totJ0Jm9S 627 JO 42000 43X50 42X00 —1^1 1073 

441JD 411000095 4®-® — 1-™ 

09* 42800 Jon 96 43X00 43500 41500 43X90 -1.20 <15 

Ed. sate HA Wrfxiete 4422 

wed's open M 34577 UP 116 

GOLD NCMX) UHlroyaL-dalanMrlroveK. 

38100 384J0 MMO 3^0 W ^ M 

ss sssi || y =sh 

38850 AuO 95 397 JO 397 JO 377 JO 296.90 -1.W 

■*81080+95 401 JO — 1O0 

39*3dS:95 40X80 608M 40600 406JO -100 18139 

40440 FeO 96 “WO 

41X30 Apr 94 5*00 -8« 

41100 Mn 96 gl-S “25 

Aug 96 42SJ0 — 000 

oa 96 43130 4»« 63290 63850 -880 

Es. sate “• s ® 

Wed’s 6penM 174J33 off 3136 


94550 91 J10 Sec 95 91740 91.750 9IJ40 *1700 

MMO 91380 95 91.520 9IJ60 91 j® t\J5U 

94320 907SOMOT96 M^O 9JJ60 91 j« 91JQ0 
91100 91J10JunM 91710 91710 9I JJ0 91^ 

92570 91JM5OT96 91760 91760 91^0 91^ 

91.020 91 -470 Doc 94 91770 91770 924*3 9'7» 

Ed.KtoS 378JW W^'W1QJM»L51B 
WWioPtelm X38M61 dl 70279 • 

BRITISH POUK1 (CMERI iMrPM+ipInimPlMn 

iST 1J04 ^»sTot 2 IJ733 1-5520 1J»4. -JM M.VP 
1^0 1J3«Jun« U550 1.5624 1-5550 1J592 -1M W 

1J6M 1J400Sep95 '■“»! - 14J / 

Ed. sales 9^73 Wed's, sales 19777 

WMTf open Ira 50J95 off 154 • 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMERI I pw Ar- 1 paM wMXHUDOn . 
g.7405 0 7030 Mar 95 87113 07127 0.70SS 87093 —36 48 TO 

0.7322 0-6990 Jun 93 0 J0B5 87065 87067 0.7071 _ — 27 1JJ7 

07430 86965 Sep 93 071170 07070 07050 07053 —17 ' JJ4 

07400 0.7060 Dec 95 870S3 87QS3 870« 07035 -® M7 

87335 D_70S5Mar96 _ 87020 -37 « 

Est. sate 5.942 VWXallS 42W - 

WoeraopenM 51JM ^ 75 

GERMAN MARK fCMOJ) tner mte- 1 BtunmaXUDOI. 

8045 1-5810 MOT 95 86493 8*509 8*611 8*647 -4 

5047 0J980Jun95 86672 86513 8666a 84475 -» 

06740 86347 Sep 95 86500 86535 86500 0.4507 —4 

86600 DJ400Mar96 84563 —30 

Ed. sate 35.7M Wed'xMlM 48,(71 , 

Wotfs Open W 71471 OH 47* 1 ., 

JAPA6CSC YEN (CMERI % pur w>- 1 doM, nu MAMOI .. 
0-010S60U1096IQ66ar9IOjnD1700JD101750J)100008QlCn 12 —54 69,101 
ddl067DU»9776Jun 95 80103408010356801022813110344 —51 XJg 
Ifn0779umatnsep95 oounai -a j® 

80TQ74080I0415D8C95 8010571 -4 1 130 

8010930DJI10560MV 96801 06350 HI 041SUHC433U110662 +J6 ® 

Ed.aJei 17J23 Wed'S, tees 20J17 

wed's open kd a* ,. 

SWISS FRANC (CMERI lew Irene. 1 MtaraMilMSei m 

06116 87787 Mar 9 5 07706 87712 87595 87647 -46 34757 

DJI 65 071 93 Jun 95 07685 87740 0.7685 87701 -66 650 

80155 87618 See 95 87775 87705 0.7750 0.77tf -66 5* 

Ed. sales 16 J3I Wad's. sr*K 19713 . ; 

wed's open H 37JH off IBP *. 


60X5 

6180 

Mil 

6280 

6110 

6SL0 

599 JJ 

«m 

5340 


— JJ 71241 
—17 18909 
—16 7.610 
-U 

-15 15J97 
-15 

—14 7J07 
-15 


I71J53 

1,951 

139 

21 


Industrials 

COTTON! CNCTN1 SAOSteX- oteipw to 



6X00 Mar 95 

729 

9800 

729 

8V96 



BOSS 

0995 

BX45 


0810 

49J0JUI95 

0X90 

87 JO 

0X70 

87 43 

77 JO 

6X80 Oct 95 

7690 

77.15 

7690 

77.10 


6X25 DOT 95 

7290 

72.95 

72.72 

72.95 

7860 

68J0*tor96 






72.10MOV96 




7X35 

EsL tote 

NA VVefTvSOBS 

7.734 




43.72 

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aa 

4060 


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39.10 
31-55 
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4165 
4335 
41 JO 
4X50 
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3932 

4433 

6400 

43-60 

41.65 

6175 

<150 

4127 


6D05 
6830 
61.15 
yinn 
MOO 
5850 
59.90 
Est sate 


jSJDMarTS 4865 
3X90 MOV 95 fl-R 
37jaJ0 | 9S 0.60 

1X»AUB» 4160 
39 JO f«0** 

*5f%ed'xsate U& 


6840 

4075 
61 JO 
4100 
4170 


IIS 
39 J* 
<890 
4165 


MAT 

41 JO 
<275 
41.70 
47.95 
6700 


-810 14309 
+80! 8796 
+802 V405 
1730 
U51 
+005 1.369 
+830 4J7 

• 810 66 

• 007 ■ 


*010 8797 
-005 1.553 
+ 0 IS 543 
-005 606 
■ 120 TO 
24 

• on 9 


411.00 
417 00 
rrs re 
41450 
41970 
<2970 
42450 
a 070 
431 JO 


Wed's Boon Inf <SJfl up 675 
KEATING OIL (NMCR1 AOBOM-eteseoi te 
6275 417S Jan 95 50J0 51.10 5810 5866 

5875 46.90 Fed 95 »75 51.15 5820 50.76 

SF-50 47 JO Mar 9S 5075 51.05 5845 50J1 

55.15 43J5Anr95 5030 5850 5810 5805 

5430 47J0Mav95 4895 5820 6970 49 JO 

5150 4X79 Jun 95 49 JO 49 JO 49J5 49JS 

5A30 4770 JulM 49 JO 49.00 49 AO «.« 

55.40 4X70 Aug 95 JOJO 5860 50.13 49.90 

5110 4R455»95 58:5 

5195 49.90 Oct 95 51x5 

54J0 5890 Nov 95 5XK 

57 JO 51 JO Dot 95 S3. 45 

5850 5070 Jan 96 S3.fi 

5970 SlOOFeD 96 5190 

5L90 52-09 Mar 96 SIM 

5450 4X00 Apt 96 SXw 

Est. sales NA Wed'xsate <4975 
WWs Open Int 14X105 off 421 B 
uurr SWEET CRUDE (NMER1 lJWBbL-ddkrt^ 
" 1736 17.96 1733 17.72 


9X10 

9144 

9239 

9236 


BaSmw tjq pH »L 


Food 


mete MJEmiSjo 178.75 1743 75ft 
gSIfL 177J0 179 JO 17X00 17X70 
BWO+i'S 17000 17423 17X5* 

'SfitaW nK I79'S 173ft 17X15 

gg&sa IBS SS IBS 


244X0 1 

24X40 1 

245.10 

»30 

94X00 

20370 


-0 35 14.060 
—070 7J46 
•055 3700 
—6,1} 2715 
>0 05 3,756 
330 

• 815 36 


1 

+803 1WH 
•803 3J04 
+801 U3» 


10733 

283 


Financial 

UST.MLL5 (CMERI si mra«»h pHoi MMpo. 

Sm nijSSw 9X41 9145 9140 

9474 9355 Jun 95 92J3 9X69 9163 

9157 9275 See 93 9371 9JJ6 93J1 

Est. sate i,9H wed's, tea 2j» 

WQd'tOOen W 38433 UP 740 

J YR. TREA5UHT (CBOT) Sltatel^MABteMISOael 
10-09 99-15 Mot 95100-06 100JI9S 100-005 1J^£— ffi 

100- 08 99-06 JU195 W-2B- M5 

99-335 9*-07 Sm9S 99-17— TO 

Ed. sate 19.500 Wod'xsote 2X024 

Weds opm m 205774 ua » 

10 Y1L TREASURY ICBOT) llMWWte*»WfOll»PCi.^ _ 

111- 07 90-11 Mar 95100-03 100-10 99-81 10MB— M S5.SB 

105-33 97-27 Jun 95 99-24 99-24 99-19 99-71 — C 

101- 06 97-11 5<P 93 99-14 99-14 99-14 99-W — » 

110-H 96-30 Dec 95 - ft « 

99- 03 98-39 Mor96 9M8 - ID 1 

ESI. sate 37.000 WwTL sales 34773 

Wed's ooen M 271J94 otf C 3 

US TREASURY BONDS (OOT) i*»-»'0X«^X2»ra'«‘>g' 
116-20 95-13 Mor9599-J4 100-04 99-13 99-1} — » 

115-19 94.27 Jun 95 99-15 99-24 99-03 9M£ - ft ’Jft* 

112- 15 94-10 S«P 95 09-12 99.1? 90-29 «-» - ft I-«6 

113- 14 91-27 Dec 95 - ft ™ 

114- 06 93-13 MOr*i g- J* “ ft ** 

100 - 20 n -06 Jun 96 98-12 - 9? 

98-14 93-05 Sep 96 ?§■?* 

Dec 96 97-38 

Ed. salm ITOJftQ WcdXtee* 158761 
werfsopemra 36X893 up 4981 

MIW OPAL BONDS (CBOT) *iDI&..nOM-o*, *■»*** <**“■*'. 

80-09 79-JI Mar 9583-10 83-20 *5-05 03-05 — 06 

53-1} 83-25 Jun 95 6*-M — 06 

Ed sales 2JD0 Wed's, sates 2.903 
Wed's open W 29JH3 Off 374 
EURODOLLARS (CHER) 11 mnooMHraiOOte. 

95.90 90 740MOr95 riJto 92.010 92.750 92.730 

9X730 90.710 Jun 95 92.030 92 JSO 91.960 V2J10 


19 JO 
2866 
19J8 
19J4 
2830 
19-07 
19J7 
I860 
19.17 
19JU 
2800 
1810 
1816 
1X80 
1817 
IBJ2 
9880 
1847 

20 JO 


15JBFob95 
1SJ2M0 95 I7J2 

1155 Apr 95 V}JD 
1169 MOV 95 17J7 
1373 Jun 93 1787 
1X05 All 95 1770 

16.16 Aug 95 17.93 
1714 See 95 17.97 

1X42 Oct 95 

17.1SNOV95 
1X50 Dec 95 17.99 
17.72 Jan 96 1805 
17.38 Feb 96 
17.1 SMar 96 1809 
17J1ABT96 
17.90 May 96 
17J2Jvn9* I8J2 
17.98 Sep 96 
17 JO DOC 96 18.45 


17.90 

17.90 

17J9 

17.92 

17.92 

17.95 

17.97 


1805 

1805 


17J5 

17J0 

17J0 

17J8 

I7J8 

17* 

17.90 


17.99 

1800 


1822 18S 
1845 1845 


17.47 
17 J9 
17 J l 
1»J3 
17JS 
17J7 
17 J9 
17.81 
178S 
17.84 
1787 
l?.« 
17.9: 
17.94 
17.97 
1801 
1011 
182i 


caat 


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♦ 816 IXTO 
+8E Oft» 
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—824 


5695 

Mim 

5870 
5830 
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Ed. sate 


Oftton95 5X50 5540 5X10 

«.]SP«J9S 53J0 5X00 5320 
49.00 Mar 95 SUO 5X00 2 to 

^ »-es mS 

SX« 5X10 55JS 
5? 40 Am 95 5X05 5X50 S89D 

S160Jul9S 5x00 5X00 MJ0 

weffs.sam 24956 


NA 


wwrsopenini 57,475 on 3 


- IP 

— 11 


2MO 

10 


Stock Indexes 

SAP 'COMP. INDEX (CMERI HO, mu 

^ 

^ 

and ora, 

Si 85 a SB 

Wod'snpcnim ).«j ^ itino Jm 








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+8J0 8. 

+UD X76T 
+U) lOf 
+830 38. 


472.176 
-29347 J34 


Moody's 
Reuters 
D.J- Pirtures 
Com. Research 


I Tiifii’rwii 1 iiriHW’w 

^ 11 ■ 1 — ~w 


Commodity Indexes 

Close 


1/06 JO 
2^000 
liSJS 
236J8 
























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Peseta Slides 


On Allegations 
In Basque Case 


- Our Staff From Dupmchm 

— Fresh allega- 
tions of government involve- 
ment in 1980s “death-squad” 
^operations against Basque seoa- 
ratists knocked the peseta down 
■ (Juirsday to a new low against 
.the Deutsche mark and bat- 
•■icred stock and bond markets 
Prime Minister Felipe Gonzi- 
lez called a news conference to 
try to calm nerves but was met 
vnth widespread skepticism. 

; Mr GonzAlez, Spain's leader 
since 1982, said there was no 
■reason to believe his govem- 
inent was weak. 

, ?“* \ hv markets appeared 
peseta ium- 
Thf tnark ended trading 
■-at 85.20 pesetas, up from 84.65 
pesetas Wednesday. 

Madrid's main stock market 
index fell 3.77 points, to 279.94, 
^ncl the price of ihe benchmark 
y)-year government bond 
dropped to 78.70 from 79.43 on 
ednesdav. 

The index has lost nearly 20 
points since the controversy 
broke with the arrest of three 
former top security officials last 
week, which followed Judge 
daliasar Garzdn's decision to 
reopen a case against a vigilante 
group from the 1 980s. 

The government is battling 
allegations that it organized the 
gnti-terrorist death squads that 
assassinated Basque separatists 
in the 198l)s. 

Some dealers played down 
the impact of the accusations 
and insisted the market losses 
had been exaggerated by light 
holiday-season trading. 

The newspaper El Mundo, 
which alleged last week that for- 




mer Interior Minister Jose Bar- 
rionuevo had been implicated in 
activity against ETA, the Basque 
Homeland and Freedom party, 
on Thursday extended the alle- 
gation to the governing Social- 
ists’ second-ranking member. 
Alfonso Guerra. 

The newspaper said its 
charges were based on inter- 
views with two former police- 
men who were jailed in 1991 for 
their roles in the murders of 
ETA members. 

Mr. Guerra denied having 
had any contact with Juli&n 
San cristobal, who was arrested 
this month on related charges. 
Mr. Barrionuevo has asked the 
courts to allow him to defend 
himself. 

“The bond and currency 
markets don't trust the situa- 
tion here,” said Pedro Eche- 
guren, director of analysis at 
County Natwest. “People are 
selling the currency, which is 
sending everything else down.” 

Mr. Echeguren said the mar- 
kets were becoming convinced 
that Mr. Gonzalez's minority 
government, which depends on 
support from the autonomous 
Catalan region, would be forced 
to call an early election. 

Mr. GonzdJez insisted that 
the government was not respon- 
sible for the assassinations and 
said his interior and justice 
minister, Juan Alberto Belloch. 
would testify before a parlia- 
mentary committee on the mat- 
ter Friday. 

GAL, the vigilante group, 
claimed responsibility for killing 
24 people in Basque country in 
France in 1983-87. 

(Reuters. AFP ) 


Airbus Wins 30- Jet Order 

U.S. Firm’s Deal Worth About $1.8 Billion 


Complied be Ow Shift from Ua peutha 

PARIS — Airbus Industrie said Thursday 
that a California leasing company had placed 
firm orders for 30 planes and had taken 
options on 10 more, a deal analysis estimate is 
worth up to SI 8 billion. 

The four-company European consortium 
did not provide a figure for the contract, but 
said the deal with International Lease Fi- 
nance C i»rp. was its biggest order of the year. 

The latest order makes International Lease 
Finance the single largest Aiinus customer, 
with total firm orders of 1 55 aircraft. 

International Lease Finance, a subsidiary of 
American International Group Lux, is the 
world's second -largest aircraft-leasing compa- 
ny. GPA Group PLC of Ireland is the largest. 

International Lease Finance apparently ne- 
gotiated u large discount or a package deal 
involving spare pans or personnel training, a 
source close lo Airbus said. 

Airbus has said it would try lo wrest market 
leadership from Boeing Co., which has an 
estimated 60 percent share of the market 
Airbus partners arc Aerospatiale of France, 


British Aerospace PLC, Construcciones Aer- 
onauticas SA of Spain and Deutsche Aero- 
space AG of Germany. 

The firm order consists of eight Airbus A- 
319s, 13 A-320s and nine A-321s. The options 
are for three A-3 1 9s, three A-32I s and four A- 
320s. Deliveries will begin in February 1996 
and continue to 2000. (AP, Reuters i 

■ Swissair Won’t Boy Host of Sabena 
Swissair said Thursday it could not specify 
bow large a stake ii would like to acquire in 
Sabena Belgian World Airlines, but it certain- 
ly was not aiming for a majority, Reuters 
reported from Zurich. 

“We can’t comment on the size of the stake, 
but it certainly is not a majority,” a Swissair 
spokesman said. He added he could not con- 
firm a report that Swissair wanted to acquire 
a 75 percent stake in Sabena for 12 billion 
Belgian francs ($370 million). 

in mid -December, Swissair’s board gave 
the go-ahead for its management to start talks 
with Sabena about collaboration, including 
acquiring a stake. 


Fokker Report Indicates Need lor Gish 


Keuirn 

AMSTERDAM — Fokker NV needs an 
injection of several hundred million guilders 
to survive, analysts said Thursday alter the 
emergence of an internal report outlining cri- 
sis plans to secure its future. 

Shares in the Dutch airplane maker closed 
al ! 1.80 guilders ($6.70). down 2.5 percent 
from Wednesday, pressured by media reports 
that cited a company document as saying the 
aircraf t maker must close a factoiy to survive. 

Fokker is controlled by Daimler-Benz 
AG's Deutsche Aerospace AG unit. 

“It's a very grave situation. The company is 
losing so much money it’s hard to keep oper- 
ating. I assume there will have to be another 
cash injectum,” said Steel Bergakker. an IRIS 
analyst. 

News of the internal Fokker report fol- 
lowed the company’s warning early this 


month that 1994 losses could match the re- 
cord 46U million guilders in 1993. 

The report, prepared by the Berenschot 
management consultancy, said Fokker planes 
were too expensive and the company had to 
lower costs dramatically to survive in the 
fiercely competitive European aircraft mar- 
ket, Dutch television reported. 

Berenschot concluded Fokker should shut a 
factory and shed 500 jobs, in addition to the 
same number that had already been earmarked 
to go. Berenschot declined to comment 

A Fokker spokesman said Wednesday 
night that the company was working on a 
plan to improve efficiency which should be 
ready in February. But he declined to com- 
ment on the report. 

In July, Deutsche Aerospace, together with 
the Dutch government, which holds a minor- 
ity stake in Fokker, agreed on a rescue pack- 
age for Fokker worth about 1 billion guilders. 


Lyonnais 
Will Sell 
Its Gnemas 


Bloombe r g Business News 

PARIS — Cr6dil Lyonnais, 
the financially troubled govern- 
ment-owned bank, said Thurs- 
day it was seeking a buyer fix 
its European chain of MGM 
movie theaters. 

The sale could fetch as much 
as 1 Ullion to 1-2 billion French 
francs ($184 million to $221 
million), according to French 
press reports. 

Crfedit Lyonnais has an- 
nounced this month the dispos- 
al of stakes in the parent of 
Adidas AG, the German sports- 
wear maker, and Bancs Lorn- 
bar da of Italy. The bank is also 
seeking a buyer for its profit- 
able Brazilian unit. Banco 
Frances & Brasil eiro. 

When Credit Lyonnais post- 
ed a 1993 loss of 6.9 billion 
francs earlier this year, it said it 
would sell assets valued at 20 
billion francs by the end of 
1995. It has predicted that its 
1994 loss would be about the 
same as that of 1993. 

The bank has asked S.G. War- 
burg Group PLC to organize the 
MGM sale, which it hopes to 
complete by the end of June. 

Credit Lyonnais said it was 
not interested in selling the 
Mctro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. 
movie studios because the bank 
think* it can get a better price 
for them later. Under U.S. 
rules, the bank must seD 75 per- 
cent of its 98.5 percent stake in 
the MGM studios by May 1997. 

MGM has 150 movie the- 
aters, of which 120 are in Brit- 
ain. 

Ndl Blackley, an analyst at 
Goldman Sachs International 
Ltd in London, said Gaumont 
SA and Pathfe Cinema SA, the 
French eimtna chains, could be 
interested in the cinemas. 



Frankfurt 

DAX 

London 

FTSE 100 index 

— ' 

rona 

CAC40 


ZD 





Mi 7u 

Zl . 3 

5V 


aw-j-yt- 
)L — 3k 

> M 
If 

ON P 
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r " 2960 — ■— 


mr nri 

1994 

Prav. 

Com 

41481 

J A SONO “^‘4 A S 

. 1904 IBM 

Exchange Index 

Amsterdam AEX 

o wo 

Thursday 

Close 

41447 

Brussels 

Stock Index ' 

7.248JB4 

7,27027 

-0.30 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2,077.03 

2,109.01 

-1-52 

Frankfurt 

FAZ 

781.19 

789.87 

-1.10 

HsWpkf . 

. HEX 

1,846.68 

1,848.95 _ 

+003 

London 

F%taw«dTknes36 

%36O20 

2,382.00 

•082 

London 

FTSE100- 

3.05&G8 

3JQ9&80 

-098 

Madrid 

General Index 

27&M 

283.71 

-1-33 

MBan 

MH3TEL . 

10003 

10W 

-1.00 

Parts 

CAG40 

IMIS 

1927.83 

-1.75 

Stockholm 

Affaersvaadden 

1,843.25 

1.848.57 

-0-18 

Vienna 

ATX index 

LQS5JJ4 

1.056.04 

-0.08 

Zurich 

SBS 

S2&38 

93437 

•064 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


Inienanonil Herald Tnhnoe 


Very briefly: 


• Poland will redenominate its currency by dropping the last four 
zeros from the zloty, effective Sunday, to ease record keeping and 
financial transactions, but the value of holdings will stay the same, 
the Finance Ministry said. 

• Argentina Corporaddn Bancaria de Espana SA, the Spanish 
state banking corporation, agreed to buy up to 10 peroral of 
Tetef toxica de Espana’s cellular phone unit. 

• Volkswagen AG said its unit sales rose 7.9 percent in November, 
to 265,800 cars, from the year-earlier month, while unit sales in the 
II months to November rose 7.1 percent, to 3.02 million units. 

■ Mobdycfce-France SARL, a subsidiary of Svenska Ceflulosa 
AB, said it was selling its Mdka-Teusan clothing unit to W illiam 
Baird PLC of Britain for about 134 million francs ($25 million). 

• East German industrial production rose 7 percent in October 
from September and 19.4 percent from October last year. 

• Neste Oy shareholders authorized plans for possible listing on 
the Helsinki bourse and a 20 percent capital increase through the 
issue of Up lO 18 miillion shares. Knifiht mditer. AFX. Roam. AFP 


NYSE 

Thursday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Wa The Associated Press 


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Continued on Page 18 


Holzmann Takeover Blocked 


Contpilaiby Our Staff From Dispatcher 

FRANKFURT — Hochtief AG, Germany’s 
second-largest construction company, suffered a 
severe setback Thursday in its bid to take over 
the largest construction company, Philipp Holz- 
mann AG, when competition authorities re- 
leased a preliminary ruling blocking the move. 

The Federal Cartel Office said Hochtief s plan 
to raise its 20 percent stake In Holzmann would 
hinder competition in specialized construction 
sectors. Holzmann shares fell 2 Deutsche marks 
to 858 ($544) in floor trading in Frankfurt. 
Hochtief fell 5 to 915. 

Hochtief in September announced a plan to 
raise its stake in Holzmann to 30 percent by 
taking over a stake held by BfG Bank. 

But what initially looked like a straightfor- 
ward equity transaction quickly developed into a 
takeover battle after Hans-Peter Keitel, chair- 
man of Hochtief, said he would push for a 
majority stake. 

Analysts said the cartel office appeared to have 
concluded that a company Hke the proposed con- 
struction gjant, with combined annual revenue of 
more than 20 billion DM, could thwart its rivals m 
bidding for large construction projects. 

The ruling Thursday was a preliminary deci- 
sion and gave both companies a chance to submit 


further data before Jan. 16, the deadline for a 
final ruling. 

This week, Hochtief said it expected the cartel 
office to reject the bid initially but that final 
approval was likely after further consideration. 
But Holzmann, welcoming the decision, said, 
“We are unaware of any case in which the Feder- 
al Cartel Office has reversed its preliminary 
decision, excluding cases in which concessions 
were agreed afterwards.” 

Claus Pfeiffer, a spokesman for Ho l z m a nn , 
added, “We have been an independent company 
since 1849, and this decision means we will 
remain one.” 

Hochtief and Holzmann jointly accounted for 
30 percent of their market, more than the five 
next largest companies combined, said JQrgen 
Kiecker, spokesman for the cartel office. 

He said the office feared that competition 
could be lessened in major market sectors such as 
high-rise buildings, power stations and tunnels, 
addmg that both companies could obtain special 
procurement advantages through Hochtief s par- 
ent, the utility company RWE AG. 

Authorities blocked an attempt by Hochtief to 
lake control of Holzmann in the 1980s. 

( Reuters. Bloomberg) 


Bull Predicts lst-Half Profit in 9 95 


APP-ExuA Ncm 

PARIS — Groupe Bull said Thursday it ex- 
pected an operating profit this year of 100'mil- 
tioa to 300 milli on francs ($18 million to $54 
mfllinn), reversing the computer maker’s operat- 
ing loss of 1.89 billion francs in 1993. 

Chairman Jean-Marie Descarpeu tries also 
told a shareholders’ meeting that Bull would 
have a net profit in the first half of 1995. He said 
Bull had reduced its nonwage costs by 125 
billion francs in 1994 and added that in 1995 and 
1996, “there will be at least as much to do.” 

Shareholders voted to approve a capital reduc- 
tion and capital injections of 234 billion francs 
from the government and 561 million francs from 
France Telecom. Tbe company’s nominal capital 


will be cut in half, to 53338 million francs, 
writing down the nominal value of its shares to 1 
francs from 20 francs, Mr. Descarpentries said. 

He said the state would then issue of 9.9 
million new shares priced at 255 francs each. 
France Telecom’s capital injection win come as a 
shareholder’s loan. Its stake in the company will 
fall to 1434 percent as a result, from about 17 
percent, and the the state's share will rose to 
7939 percent from about 75 percent. 

Among other shareholders, NEC Corp.’s share 
wQl fan to 3.74 percent from 4.46 percent. Interna- 
tional Business Machines Corp.’s stake win de- 
cline to 1.78 percent from 2.1 percent, and s hares 
bdd by the general public will dwindle to 035 
percent from 0.7 percent, the Bull chairman said. 


BOOM: Shanghai Building Boom Rattles Analysts 


Contmnedfroa Page 13 

traffic and public transport 
problems win take the luster off 
real 

“They’re destroying the 
whole neighborhood and send- 
ing us so far away,” said one 
doerly woman in the market. 
She watched housing built in 
the 1930s, Shanghai's last seri- 
ous boom, topple under the on- 
slaught of wreckers. “It's very 
unfair.” 

While many elderly residents 
fear the bunding frenzy will 
take years off their lives, prop- 
erty analysts predict dire conse- 
quences lor developers about to 
be squeezed by the coming glut 

“Shanghai, if everything now 
planned gets btzflt, wfll have one 
of the biggest oversupply prob- 


lems tbe world's ever seen,” 
said Peter Churchouse, manag- 
ing director for Morgan Stanley 
Asia. He based his prediction 
on relative occupancy rales. 

Mr. Churchouse estimated 
that of the 37 million square 
feet of new office space now 
planned, 70 percent of it will 
stand empty for years to come. 
In all of Hong Kong, there is a 
total of about 69 milli on square 
feet of office space. 

“It’s pretty frightening 
stuff,” he said of the potential 
oversupply. 

He said Hong Kong's major 
foreign banks would not be 
dragged down by exposure to 
the boom. But he was less sure 
of tbe many smaller Hong 
Kong industrial companies 
who, in league with local part- 


ners, have begun dabbling in 
real-estate speculation. 

“We haven’t gotten to the 
bottom of where m the funding 
is coming from so far,” Mr. 
Churchouse said. “But China’s 
banking system must have a 
great deal of exposure to it.” 

Quality Shanghai office 
space is now among the world's 
most expensive to rent, as de- 
mand has quickly outstripped 
supply in the expansion eupho- 
ria. 

But if all the blueprints turn 
into steel-bending and concrete 
pours, Jones Lang Wootton, a 
real-estate consultancy, pre- 
dicted existing office space 
would rise twentyfold. 

Even Shanghai cannot grow 
fast enough to take up all that 


Base Rates 
To Increase 
In France 

Bloomberg Business News 

PARIS — France’s ma- 
jor commercial banks said 
they would raise their base 
lending rates to 835 per- 
cent from 7.95 percent, the 
second rise in three 
months, to reflect an in- 
crease in money market 
rates. 

The rise takes effect Fri- 
day at Credit Lyonnais. So- 
dfetfc G6nfirale and Credit 
Commercial de France, 
and on Jan. 3 at Banque 
Nationals de Phris. 

Banque Paribas said it 
had not decided whether to 
raise its base rates. 

Compagme Finandbre de 
CIC, a less prominent bank 
that is a unit of Groupe des 
Assurances Nationales, an- 
nounced the same increase, 
effective Friday. 

Matthew Merritt, a Eu- 
ropean economist at 
NaiWest Securities in Lon- 
don, said the rate rise was 
the banks’ way of putting 

P ressure on the Bank of 
ranee not to cut its in in- 
vention rate, which sets the 
floor under the money mar- 
ket. 

ft Suez Unit Cats Losses 
Banque Monod, a unit of 
C:nnpakni& de Suez, an- 
nounced its net losses for 
19v4 would be 80 milli on to 
90 million francs, compared 
with 235 nriffion francs in 
1993, Agence France-Press 
reported. 

Franqois Lesi&rr, presi- 
dent of Monod, said Suez 
had contributed 216 mil- 
lion francs to Monod in 
1994, including a 130 mil- 
lion franc capital increase. 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, F1UPAY, DECEMBER 30, 


Casino Operators Place Bets on MTV Kids ***.****£?;£ 


By Barry Meier 

Sew York Times Scmce 

NEW YORK 


lsa i!'made lake. Each hotel 
the $900 million com- 
rooffl j. : c scheduled to open 


-*■£.- iiill §§111 pllii IS®! 18S5 fife SpSsE 

■safeas sfirst— — ;S?S*a Ssswsss si&Ss ssacri;* ss! 3 £fe£ 


1- 


SHU VUiwm 

Corfu and Rhodes. 

At the same time. 


casino 


"OHIO ICl goiu*/— 

Of games, and gaming iaN«i m ^ 

the shapes of musical mshu- ^g^es are attracting c»r^ 
menb^ASactiiig youngffgam- ^ we ek, for in- 

blere is just one smte^y on rate^ m Corp., which oper- 
whichthec^oindusl^^hej hotels and casinos 

tingtokecpitsbuOT^^^S- ^nationally through its JIT 
After years of aggr^e ex raWD subsidiary, agreed to 
pansion, gambling acq uiie Caesars World Inc. in a 

face the prospect that the cafraa- ^ at $1 7 billion, 
ty of casinos will <*£. d The deal will benefit ITT by 

pace the number (rfplayerewEU Caesars gambling 

{hem. So lookmg expe ri^ce and 

Unlring the Caesars operations 
with ITTs hotels worldwide. 

The ITT move followed its 
acquisition of Madison Square 
Garden in New York and coin- 
cided with the sale of some of 
its f inan cial-service operations. 
It is seen by many analysts as an 

effort by ITT to concentrate on 

the entertainment-and-leisure 

industry. _ 

By purchasing Caesars, it J 
already the owner of the De- 


to attract new customers. 

They are also looking to Dig- 
ger attractions — such as a 
coming Mirage Resorts Inc. ca- 
sino in the middle of a man- 
made lake, and MGM Grand s 
“New York-New York'’ project 
to pull in the casual tourist. 

Finally, they are considering 
new markets in the United 
States and in nations from 
Greece to South Africa. . 

Jason Ader, an analyst with 
Smith Barney, Shearson Inc„ 


' More Action \-isr 

■ Sonwlea^U^^^) , 
-.asiiji^R^w pfews,'. . . ' ... . . :•* 

CmtoBUY • i*owiH«in planned 

..atTef flW !^we«8tt - 

■eSsmWWR-''"'^ ■ ■■ 

1 


CircuS;Gta5us.: : : P ■■ 

2 

Rivedxate .. ~‘.L ■ • 

GiwtCadnCd •' 5‘" - 

3 

■jftdi^cas^bst ' ^ ' 

■ Baton Hotels ' • 

1 

•ffiverfaoate. 

MssgeB eewte - v 

2 

'None 


4 

tnegao ca^iost, 


Meanwnuc, some 
Viiino companies have been mi 

by bankruptcies. Even among ^ # n 

sisraisss 

M® looking to attrjd 

customers 


more expensive. 

Promus recently agreed to 
pay more than 21 percent on 
borrowed funds to finance the 


borrowed xuuua iv — 

construction of a casmo in New 
Orleans- Coupons on the bonds 
pay a beady interest rate of 
1425 percent; the company 
also agreed to give bondholder 
nf tho rarinn s cash 


Gtymtbel 95 ^anu«-^ 

S&a'S'Kft'S 

■ssvssssa 

Sg,^«;sSs 

S Sd be^ise Promus had 


- — — Because in w*** — j - 

have an agreement to d* ^ S (yoo°^^Sw)1 (18,000- 
3 additional restaurant and wu, casino until mid- 



tLOW up to JJJVJ U111UWM » J~— 1 
according to a Harrahs New 
Orleans executive. 

“This was the year that inves- 
tors learned that risks involved 
in casinos were higher than 
originally perceived,” said Mr. 
Ader of Smith Barney. 

The gambling industry has 
also recently taken its share of 


I also recenuy ut&cu iu» v. 
lumps politically. Despite a war 


ffiSKS/KSbio^-h George tiSgam^ on the Atlantic 

nw upto S 350 million a year, that he nu^t legisla is to get the walk-m *>usi- ^ NeW jersey, swnc — 

*« n Hnrrah's New non permitting „ om _ ness ” said Joseph Coccimiglio, Donald Trump — is 

!n Pam 5yl v ania, where gam^ amdyst ^“S^e^This.op- 

-aarjsss?* S^mssss 

penmt a statewide referendum ^ ea ^ Riv ^ ge> or Beautiful project may 

on the issue. Shore, the casino-hotel will be mg nine months. 

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Bloomberg Busmen ,Ym 

on^Th^rSf KONG ~ Standard & Poor's Corp. 
’wii: ^?u y r ?*? 1 ,LS ralia ^ on more than $4 

DUiion of bonds from Malaysia and Thailand 
and praised the iwo countries* abiliiv to “keep 

JJJJm eco 2? m,ek ° n . track " despite' changing 
*orid market conditions. 

-* T ? e T 'f ew Yoril based ratings agcncv raised to 
A-plus from A its ratings on SI. 65 billion of 
’•♦ng-ierm foreign currency debt of the Malav- 
gj" government and three related companies. 
S&P also upgraded roughly $2.5 billion of Thai 
government bonds to A from A-minus 

Bonds with A ratings are considered “upper- 
-^unvgrade obligations" with some elementsof 
risk. Malaysia s rating makes it more creditworthy 
than Hong Kong and China, in S&P’s opinion, 
l ne only Asian sovereign issuers with higher rat- 
ings are Japan, Singapore and Taiwan Thailand's 
upgrade puts it on a par with Hong Kong. 

Certainly this will benefit us because we will 
receive better terms if we want to go into the 
market, said C havalit Thanachanan. chairman 
of Industrial Finance Corp. of Th ailan d, the 
■country’s development bank, which is 30 percent 
government-owned. 

Industrial Finance Corp.’s implied debt rating 
was raised along with that of the government. 
The rating *s implied because the concern does 

■ not yet have anv foreign-currency debt, tun the 
^company if considering a sale of dollar-denomi- 

nated bonds, or Yankee bonds, in the United 
States, S&P said. 

Thailand's biggest problems now are the slow 
pace at which the country is building an infra- 
structure and its growing reliance on external 

■ debt. Malaysia's challenge. S&P said, will be to 


meet the demands of an economy growing at 
close to a 9 percent annual rate. With a low 2.9 
percent unemployment rate, Malaysia faces a 
labor shortage that could slow industrial produc- 
tion and growth. S&P said. 

These problems aside. Standard & Poor’s said, 
the outlook is for consistently strong economic 
growth, moderate or manageable inflation and a 
healthy and diversified export and investment 
base in MaJaysiu and Thailand. 

“We are generally bullish on the region. Our 
perspective is medium-term, and we don't see 
much capacity or scope for slippage by these or 
others we rate in the region,” said Alan Tregilgus. 
an analyst for Standard & Poor’s in Melbourne. 

Malaysia’s gross domestic product will in- 
crease 8 percent or more in 1995. S&P forecast, 
after seven years of 8.7 percent average annual 
growth. The country's inflation rate, as measured 
by the consumer price index, has run at less than 
4 percent in 1994. 

Thailand's economic picture is similar, with an 
8.5 percent increase in gross domestic product 
for 1994 and a 9 percent forecast for 1995. 
inflation, however, could be more troublesome, 
increasing to 6 percent next year from 5 percent. 
Mr. Tregilgas said. 

[S&P also raised ratings on foreign debt of 
Malaysia’s two listed utilities, Telekom Malaysia 
Bhd. and Tenaga NasionaJ Bhd., Agence France- 
Presse reported. Telekom’s $350 million of con- 
vertible bonds due 2004 and Tenaga’s $600 mil- 
lion of notes due the same year were upgraded to 
A-plus from A, reflecting the commitment of the 
Malaysian government to the two privatized util- 
ities* viability, S&P said.) 


Seoul Stocks Poised for Gains 


Reuters 

SEOUL — The Seoul stock exchange, under- 
pinned by brisk economic growth, abundant li- 
quidity and an easing of the foreign shareholding 
ceiling, ended the year 18.6 percent higher, and 
analysts forecast more growth in 1995. 

But the composite stock index, which closed at 
1,027.37 on Wednesday, was still 9.8 percent 
below the record closing high of 1,138.39 that it 
reached on Nov. 9. 1994. 

Market capitalization, the total value of out- 
standing slocks on the exchange, rose to a record 
164 trillion won ($207.24 billion) on Nov. 9, a 
rise of 46 percent from 1993. 

“Blue-chip manufacturers, primary blue chips 
in particular, came under the spotlight this year 
as most have benefited from the robust economy 
■ and strong exports,” said Lee Seong-dae, general 
manager of Seoul Securities. 

Analysts said the market would extend its 
gains next year on the back of strong economic 
growth. 

The Bank of Korea, the country's central 
fctank, has projected that the economy wfl] grow 
7.3 percent in real terms next year, compared 
with an estimated 7.9 percent this year. 


“The market is certain to reach a high of 1 .300 
next year and is expected to gain by 20 or 30 
percent further in 1996,” said Kim Sung-ho. vice 
president of Lehman Brothers in Seoul. 

Seoul Securities predicted a high of 1,250 next 
year, while Daewoo Securities predicted 1,400 
and Tongyang Securities forecast 1.380. 

“Government monetary policy will decide 
market direction next year,' 1 said Mr. Kim of 
Lehman Brothers. 

■ Korea Signals Hopes for WTO Candidate 

South Korea mil name Kim Chul-su, its for- 
mer trade minister, as ambassador for interna- 
tional trade in a move to help him in the race for 
the top post of the emerging World Trade 
Organization. 

“Mr. Kim Chul-su can now concentrate on his 
campaign, free from his burden as a trade minis- 
ter,” said Chung Ui-yong, director of interna- 
tional trade in the Foreign Ministry. 

Widely supported by Asia-Pacific countries, 
including Japan and Australia, Mr. Kim is in a 
three-way race with Carlos Salinas de Gortari. 
former president of Mexico, and Renato Rug- 
giero, former Italian trade minister. 


A Wet Blanket 
For Stir-Fried 
Shanghai Shares 


Confuted bv Our Safi From Dopateh a 

SHANGHAI — Stir fil- 
ing is about to go off the 
menu at the Shanghai Stock 
Exchange. 

The name of a Cantonese 
cooking technique, in which 
smoking-boi oil is used to 
fry food in seconds, has been 
adopted by brokers and 
traders to describe a method 
of rapid-fire buying and sell- 
ing that has flourished Chi- 
na’s largest stock exchange. 

Starting Jan. 1, however, 
the Shanghai exchange will 
abolish the same-day settle- 
ment system that has al- 
lowed speculators to pile up 
quick trading profits. 

The so-called T-plus-0 set- 
tlement system wall be re- 
placed by T-plus-1, or next- 
day settlement This means 
traders will have to hold their 
purchases at least overnight 
before turning them around 

Analysts and brokers said 
the change could dramati- 
cally improve conditions for 
investors on the Shanghai 
exchange, which has gamed 
a reputation for high volume 
and volatility since it was 
founded four years ago. 

In the year ended Dec. 23, 
volume of domestically trad- 
ed dass-A shares on the 
S hang hai exchange was 557.6 
billion yuan ($65.6 billion), 
more than twice the market 
capitalization of about 250 
billion yuan. 

Brokers said same-day 
trading could account for 
more than half of turnover 
during a bull market, such as 
the one the exchange experi- 
enced earlier in the year. 

Exchange officials decid- 
ed in October to get rid of 
same-day settlement after 
Chinese securities dealers 
warned that trading was be- 
coming too frenzied as trad- 
ers concentrated on minute- 
lo-minute price movements, 
rather than on fundamentals 
factors such as company re- 
sults and economic trends. 

Brokers said the new set- 
tlement system would not 
kill speculation, but it might 
cause traders to pay more 
attention to fundamentals. 

They also said the change 


would wtak«» Shanghai’s trad- 
ing less volatile, the better to 
attract large institutions and 
ordinary individuals. 

“Major institutions would 
like more stable prices, so 
they can operate more ratio- 
nally cm the basis of techni- 
cal charts,” said Zhang Lei, 
a broker with Shanghai In- 
ternational Securities. 

Mr. Zhang said the main 
losers from the change will be 
wealthy individuals and 


Rapid baying 
and selling 
obscures the 

f nmismpntfll 
reasons for 
owning shares. 


small inslitidons who special- 
ized in bidding up prices of 
cheap stocks in small compa- 
nies before taking profits. 

The new system could 
help even out wild index 
movements. Between Janu- 
ary and July the index of A 
shares lost 40 percent of its 
value, shot up by more than 
200 percent in August and 
September, and is now down 
about 40 percent from its 
mid-September high. 

Hard-currency class-B 
shares, held mainly by over- 
seas investors, mil be little 
affected by the new rule be- 
cause the illiquidity of the B 
market makes trading diffi- 
cult (Reuters, Bloomberg) 

■ Bond Crackdown 

The Shanghai Securities 
Exchange has banned profi- 
teering in treasury bonds, 
saying traders who defy the 
ban will be fined and sus- 
pended. Bloomberg Business 
News reported Thursday. 

The exchange said it is 
targeting traders who trans- 
fer ownership of spot trea- 
sury bonds without paying 
in a bid to drive up bond 
future prices. 

Violators will face fines of 
between 10.000 and 200,000 
yuan. 


China Vows 
To Step Up 
Control of 
Grain Sales 

Compiled bv Oie Staff Firm Dispatches 

BEIJING — China on 
Thursday ordered tighter con- 
trol of the grain market next 
year to increase supplies and 
curb price rises that nave fueled 
runaway inflation. 

The Economic Information 
Daily quoted the deputy minis- 
ter of internal trade, Bai Meiq- 
mg, as saying the state must con- 
trol 70 percent to 80 percent of 
the grain and edible oil in com- 
mercial circulation to ensure sta- 
ble prices and guarantee sup- 
plies. That percentage. Mr. Bai 
said, “can never be relaxed.” 

He said state buying had 
been helped by a rise in prices 
paid to fanners in June, because 
state prices were lower than 
market prices. 

But be said only the central 
government had the power lo 
set policy on grain production 
and prices. He said the prov- 
inces were responsible for pro- 
duction, gathering stockpiles 
and ensuring price stability. 

In addition, he said, only the 
central government and provin- 
cial authorities may buy grain 
directly from farmers. 

Frequently this year. local 
governments needing grain, or 
private enterprises seeking quick 
profits, offered higher prices to 
farmers. State supplies fell as a 
result, and prices soared. 

The latest official figures 
showed the price of grain in 35 
major cities in October was 61.6 
percent higher than a year earli- 
er. with increases of 723 per- 
cent in Shanghai and the high- 
est, 83.6 percent, in Fuzhou. 

Overall inflation averaged 
26.4 percent annually in 35 ma- 
jor cities in November. 

Separately, the State Devel- 
opment Bank’s president. Yao 
Zhenyan, pledged to increase 
loans to agriculture-related pro- 
jects by 20 percent next year, 
with priority given to raising 
grain yields. 

The increased funding is 
aimed at reaching the harvest 
target of 500 million metric tons 
of grain by 2000. Mr. Yao was 
quoted as saying by the China 
Daily. 

An official estimate this 
month put the 1994 grain har- 
vest at 447.7 million tons, down 
from the record 456.44 million 
tons in 1993. (Reuters. AFP ) 


|| Investor’s Asia | 

Hong Kong 
Hang Seng 

Singapore 
Straits Times 

Tokyo 
Nikkei 225 







■ MB,/ mnXhx 

* V 1 

1994 

Exchange 

Hong Kong 



tew 

PlW. % 

Close diange 

8,26aZ2 *0.87 

Mff “"J'A SCSI) 
1904 

Index Thursday 

Close 

Hang Seng 8,196412 

Singapore 

Straits Times 

2,243412 

ft234.1S 

+0.40 

Sydney 

MCktibaries 

IJXSZJdQ 

- 1^3550 

"0.14 

Tokyo ■ 

Nikkei 225 

1%7SSLBS 19,66553 

+0,44 

j Kuala Lumpur Composite 

967.14 

975^7 

•0.90 

BatgkoK 

SET 

1^52 89 

1,36324 

■0.76 

Seoul 

Composite Sock 

Clomd 

1 JQ273S 

- 

Talpet 

Weighted Price 

7 $87 A3 

6^47.83 

+1.15. 

Manfis 

PSE 

%78S31 

2,777.78 

*029 

Jakarta 

Stocklndex 

Closed 

469l64 

- 

New Zealand 

NZSE-40 

1^)0837 

wa83 

•0.54 

Bombay 

Nc^ontf Index 

Closed 

1,8®. 78 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


bvnuiwari Herald Tribune 

Very briefly: 


• Oriental Press Group Ltd. announced a 15 percent drop in half- 
year profit, to 216.6 million Hong Kong dollars ($28 million) in 
the six months ended Sept. 30 from 255.9 milli on dollars a year 
earlier, as it sought to turn around its seven-month-old English- 
language daily, the Eastern Express. 

■ Adnan Khashoggi, the Saudi Arabian investor, led a group 
offering 1.98 billion baht ($79 million) for a 21 percent stake in 
Jalaprathan Cement Co» Thailand’s fourth-largest cement pro- 
ducer. 

• Giant Manufacturing Co. shares soared by their 7 percent daily 
limit on their first day of trading on the Taiwan Stock Exchange, 
as investors reacted to the bicycle maker’s promising prospects in 
China and expectations of improved earnings in 1995. 

• First Pacific Co. and the British telecommunications concern 
Vodafone Group PLC will merge their Hong Kong joint-venture 
companies. Pacific fink Communications and Pacific Telefink. 

• Indonesia is studying selling up a plant in Europe to assemble its 
N-250 turboprop aircraft, similar to the one it plans to build in the 
United States. 

• Janfine Matheson Holdings Lid. ends trading on the Hong Kong 
stock exchange Friday as it implements its decision made in 
March to move its headquarters to Singapore. 

■ CWna plans to seek a new round of bids for onshore oil 
exploration projects next year, as its national output levels off 
while demand soars. Several prospective oil and natural gas fields 
will be opened for bidding by foreign companies in 1995, said 
Wang Too, president of Obdna National Petroleum Corp. 

• China’s telecommunications sector is seeking to end foreign 
companies' near-monopoly on its booming digital switching mar- 
ket by merging its existing companies into what it hopes will be 
two powerful, competitive conglomerates. 

• Tenaga Naskmal Bhd. said it would spend as much as 7 billion 
ringgit ($3 billion) building substations and upgrading its services 
to cope with increasing electricity demand in Malaysia. 

• Vietnam's economy grew 8.5 percent in 1994 on the strength of a 
good harvest and robust trade, according to preliminary govern- 
ment figures. Industry grew 13.5 percent during the year, while 
agricultural output grew 4.5 percent. 

AFP, Bloomberg. Reuters. AP 


.Jributu 







. t.t*; 



Thai Firm Plans $1 Billion Chip Project 


Bloomberg Business News 

BANGKOK — Alphalec Electronics 
Co. said Thursday it would invest about S 1 
billion to launch Thailand’s most ambi- 
tious semiconductor project so far. 

The project will be undertaken through 
a subsidiary called SubMicron Technology 
Co., the company’s chief executive, Cham 
Usw-ichofce, said SubMicron will produce 
ultra thin silicon wafers, the base material 
for microchips. 

A group made up mostly of Thai banks 
will provide a revolving loan for the pro- 
ject of about 20 billion baht ($800 million). 

Bangkok Bank LtiL, Krung Thai Bank 
Ltd.TNakomthon Bank Co- Bangkok 
•Metropolitan Bank Ltd. and Industrial Fi- 
nance Corp. of Thailand will lead the 
: group of lenders. Several of the banks will 
■also have equity stakes. Mr. Cham said. 

Mr. Cham also said Aiphatec planned 


to take SubMicron public “sometime next 
year.” 

He said the project had already lined up 
technology advisers and potential custom- 
ers such as AT&T Coip., Rockwell Inter- 
national Corp. and National Semiconduc- 
tor Corp. 

Aiphatec’ s first big move came in 1991 
when it bought the chip-packaging assem- 
bly line of Signetics Co., now a division of 
Philips Electronics NV. Aiphatec now as- 
sembles integrated circuits on a contract 
basis for Signetics. 

The company also assembles computer 
chips for National Semiconductor and 
Olin Corp., from which Aiphatec also 
bought production divisions. 

“The quality of Alphatec’s customer 
raluabie access to some of 


base has given it val 
the world’s leading 
John Hui, an analyst for 


’ said 
Trust 


Research, in a report on the company. 

In June, Mr. Chain and Aiphatec jointly 
bought the Thai phone manufacturing di- 
vision of AT&T, which they spun off into a 
separate company. Alpha tel. 

Aiphatec now produces integrated cir- 
cuits for AT&T and AlphateL 

Analysts said the company’s strategy 
was wise, as it had made (he company 
important but not threatening. 

“It’s growing rapidly, but not getting too 
big,” said Michael Hodgson, an analyst for 
Nomura Securities. “Cham wants to keep 
it handy for the big boys like Texas Instru- 
ments and AT&T. But he doesn't want to 
make it big enough to be a threat.'' 

Alphatec’s net profit this year will be 
about $20 million on sales of $400 million, 
Mr. Cham said, adding that he “conserva- 
tively” forecasts revenue growth of 15 per- 
cent in 1995. 


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AMEX 

Thuraday's Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wail Street and do not reflec 
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EVTERIVAnONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1994 




SPORTS 


The Orange Bowl’s AU About Beef 

Game Deciding College Title Will Be Decided by linemen 


By Malcolm Moras 

New York Times Service 

MIAMI — They met three 
weeks ago in Orlando. Florida, 
when the status of Nebraska's 
Zach WIegert and Rob Za- 
techka and Miami's Warren 
Sapp as the most honored col- 
lege linemen in the nation was 
confirmed. 

They were in Disney World, 
somewhere in that strange place 
between the football season and 
an Orange Bowl meeting. They 
were this far removed from die 
reality of their public lives: 
They were linemen in suits and 
ties. 

Wiegert, the offensive right 
tackle, received the Out] and 
Trophy that night Zatechka, 
Nebraska's other offensive 
tackle with a 4.0 average and a 
degree in biological sciences, 
was named Academic All- 
American of the year. Sapp, a 
defensive right tackle who had 
already won the Lombardi 
Award, was named defensive 
player of the year. 

As he sat in an open-air the- 
ater where the awards were giv- 
en out, Sapp w as asked what he 
saw when he watched Glm of 
Nebraska's offensive line. “A 
lot of weight" he said, and the 
audience laughed. 

“And his mom came up to me 
and Rob," Wiegert remem- 
bered, “and said, 'Don't you 
hurt my baby.' " 


Sapp’s personality quickly 
made him a center of attention 


among players be had just met. 


"He seemed like a nice guy," 
Wiegert said- 

That is not the point this 
week. Sapp waspoHtdy compli- 
mentary of the Husker line. But 
long before this junior season, 
from listening to older former 
Miami teammates, Sapp 
learned how such public discus- 
sions are conducted here. 

When he was asked about the 
personal matchup be faced — a 
question that meant the indi-» 
vidual matchup — Sapp re- 
vealed a basis of the Miami 
mind-set. “It’s not personal,'’ 
he said. “It's always business.” 

From the time Sapp first ar- 
rived, as a red-shirted tight end 
on the scout team at the begin- 
ning of the 1991 season, be fol- 
lowed the lead of the most 
shrewd Hurricanes. “This ain’t 
my first barbecue,” Sapp said. 

He was asked about the sig- 
nificance of Nebraska's quest 
for its first national champion- 
ship with Tom Osborne as head 
coach coming down to the Or- 
ange Bowl confrontation on 
Sunday night between the 
Husker offensive line and Mi- 
ami's defensive line. As each 
team faces its greatest challenge 
of the season, Sapp moved 
quickly to the root of his feel- 
ings. 

“If you are going to put that 
load on me and my teammates 
playing defease, if we have to 
do that to win the game, chalk it 
up,” Sapp said. 

The words were tumbling (Hit 
quickly, fast enough that a re- 


porter asked again if that is 
what he meant 

“I told you, ‘Chalk it up/ ” 
Sapp said, the words coming 
more slowly, his tone more di- 
rect, his smile temporarily gone. 

He had just gotten through 
praising the Huskers in the 
proper measured terms, using 
words like “efficient” and 
stressing Nebraska’s ability to 
work together. Nebraska led the 
nation with an average of 340 
rushing yards this season, and 
even with injuries to quarter- 
backs Tommie Frazier and 
Brook Beningex that continue 
to make for an unsettled situa- 
tion at that position, the Husk- 
ers' average of 478 total yards 
per game was fifth best in the 
country. 

The line became the con- 
stant 

“When Tommie got hurt, no- 
body thought we could win 
without him,” Wiegert said, 
“and when we did, they thought 
it must be because of the offen- 
sive line." 

That think ing began to take 
hold when the Huskers domi- 
nated UCLA in September, and 
it intensified when Nebraska 
gained 345 yards in its 24-7 vic- 
tory over then third-ranked 
Colorado. 

The five regulars in the Husk- 
er interior line have started a 
total of 109 games. Wiegert and 
Zatechka, native Nebraskans 
and offensive co-captains, will 
play in their fourth Orange 
BowL The line has an average 


size of 6 feet, 4V4 inches and 295 
pounds with 15.6 percent body 
fat The advantage over Mi- 
ami’s defensive front is an aver- 
age of 29 pounds. 


But when Sapp was asked 
out the way Nebraska had 


about the way Nebraska had 
controlled Colorado, he shook 
bis head and frowned. “Colora- 
do wasn’t aggressive,” Sapp 
said. “Colorado let them pound 
them.” 

Sapp’s thinking is that Mi- 
ami’s aggressiveness and to- 
getherness will overcome any 
Nebraska advantages. “It’s not 
the size of the dog, ifs the bite," 
he said. “That’s always the way 
it is. It’s a game of leverage, Fm 
a short fellow.” 

Sapp smiled. The line next to 
his name on the Miami roster 
says 6 feet, 3 inches and 280 
pounds. 

“I'll get underneath than.” 
he said. “Low man wins. That’s 
the way they always taught me. 
Low man wins. This is no ordi- 
nary team. This is no ordinary 
defense. We're coining to play 
They better strap it up real 
tight We’re coming.” 

Wiegerfs response was to 
shrug and smile when Sapps’s 
opinions were passed along. Za- 
techka understands the Miami 
approach. He preferred a more 
subtle response. 


“I know that they* v ego t a lot 
talent ud front,” Zatechka 


of talent up front,” Zatechka 
said. “I can’t say right now, 
‘We’re going to go out and to- 
tally crush them,' because we 
haven’t done that yet-" 



Cavaliers Run 
Streak to 10 




boo Kqbb/ R eam 

Tyrone MB had only a temporary problem scoring against the Bullets. 


way the team is winning. _ 

their wc, “ y ] 

beating the „ 

tallaonev irtorv away from the franchise ; 
2fc?ll strait, set last February and ? 

March. i 

As has been the case throughout the 

streak, the Cavs won with a tmous,TO« * 
rarin g defense and a deliberate off ense ■ 

sfsylem that wouldn’t lately be very. 4 
popular if it wasn’t producing so well f 

“It wasn’t pretty,” said Mark . Wee-; * 
who scored 15 points. “It was * gnnd-jt-- ; 
out and in the second half our , 

defense was much better.” 

Washington, which has lost 10 of 1 1 T 1 
games, scored just 3 1 points in the second , 
half, and its final total was a season low • 
for the team. 

The game marked the fourth time dur- 
ing the current streak that the Cavs have 
yidded fewer than 80 points; only one 
t<*am has readied 100 against them dur- 
ing that span. 

Jazz 117, Pacers 95: Jeff Horaacek 
scored 22 points and Karl Malone 21, 
while John Stockton had 1 8 points and 1 2 
assists as Utah extended its winning 
Streak to eight, winning for the 15th tune 
in 18 games. 



Franco Signs Contract, 
Setting Japanese Mark 


Now, the Umps 


IARD 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Julio Franco for- 
mally agreed Wednesday to a 
one-year contract with the Chi- 
ba Lotte Marines that will pay 
him S3.5 million, a record for 
Japanese baseball. 

The 1991 American League 
batting champion will receive a 

5500.000 signing bonus and S3 
million in 1995, said a team 
official, Juzo Mitsuno. 

The team's $2,2 million op- 
tion for 1996 becomes guaran- 
teed if Franco plays 110 or 
more games next season. Fran- 
co can earn an additional 

510.000 for each game played. 
Franco, 30, hit .319 for the 

Chicago White Sox last season 
with 20 homers and 98 RBIs in 
112 games. He would earn a 

5350.000 bonus if he wins Ja- 


pan’s triple crown, for batting 
average, home runs and RBIs. 
The Marines also signed out- 


To subscribe in Franc* 


jus* coll, loll free, 
OS 437 437 


fielder Pete Incaviglia to a 52 
million, one- year deal and left- 
hander pitcher Eric Hfllman to 
a 5725,000, one-year contract 

The Marines will be managed 
by Bobby Valentine. AU three 
players have been on teams he 
managed in the major leagues. 

• In the biggest major league 
deal in numbers is 37 years, the 
San Diego Padres made a 12- 
player trade with the Houston 
Astros, acquiring third base- 
man Ken Caminiti and center 
fielder Steve Finley in their 
group of six players. 

“We want a competitive, win- 
ning team, an exciting team,'’ 
said Larry Lucchino, the Pa- 
dres’ new chief executive under 
the new owner, John Moores. 
“To improve this team, on the 
field and in stability and pros- 
perity, expenses and revenues 
have to go up.” 

Besides Caminiti and Finley, 
the Padres received Andujar 
Ccdeno, the Astros’ starring 
shortstop; Roberto Petagine, a 
minor-league first baseman, 
and Brian Williams, a sometime 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Base- 
ball’s second labor dispute 
began Wednesday when the 
owners notified umpires they 
will be locked out after this 
weekend and won’t be paid. 

National League presi- 
dent Len Coleman said the 
umpires received the lock- 
out notification by over- 
night mail- Umpires are 
paid on a year-round basis 
and their four-year coa- 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DivUHja 


tract expires Saturday. 
The National Hoc 


The National Hockey 
League lockout remained 
as frozen as ever: no pro- 
gress, no talks planned and 
no reason to think the sea- 
son can be salvaged. 


I starting pitcher, plus a player to 
be named or $5(5,000 in cash. 


The Astros, who suddenly 
more closely resemble the pre- 


vious Padres than the present 
Padres do, succeeded in becom- 
ing a younger, cheapo 1 team. 
They received two starting out- 
fielders, Phil Plantier and 
Derek Bell; two pitchers yet to 
establish themselves, Pedro 
Martinez and Doug Brocail, 
and two infieiders, Ricky Gu- 
tierrez and Craig Shipley. 

If the trade remains a 12- 
player transaction, it will be the 
largest in numbers since the De- 
troit Tigers and the Kansas City 
Athletics exchanged 13 players 
in 1957. (AP, NYT) 



W L 

PC* 

OB 

Orlando 

22 5 

815 

— 

New York 

M 72 

sm 

m 

New Jersey 

12 18 

A00 

ms 

Boston 

10 17 

-37Q 

12 

Philadelphia 

11) 17 

370 

12 

Miami 

8 17 

320 

13 

Washington 

7 It 

Central Dlvtotoe 

780 

T4 

Cleveland 

If 8 

joe 

«— 

Indiana 

16 9 

640 

2 

awriatie 

14 12 

sn 

*V3 

ailcooo 

14 13 

sn 

s 

Atlanta 

11 14 

jar 

B 

Detroit 

9 16 

MO 

9 

Milwaukee 

9 17 

Mt 

9W 

WEST BBM CONPERENCH 
Midwest Dlvisiwi 



W L 

pa 

GB 

Utah 

19 8 

J 04 

— 

Houston 

Id 9 

MO 

2 . 

Son Antonia 

14 9 

-409 

3 

Denver 

13 12 

520 

5 

Dallas 

12 12 

-500 

5VS 

Minnesota 

6 19 

PacMcDMston 

340 

12 

Phoenix 

21 6 

J7B 

— 

Seattle 

18 8 

692 

2V4 

l-A. Lakers 

15 9 

625 

4W 

■Sacramonfo 

M 72 

338 

Mr 

Portland 

12 12 

300 

7V> 

Gulden Stale 

10 75 

JOB 

10 

l_A. Clippers 

4 23 

.148 

17 

WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS 


OUcaao 

31 34 

19 19—105 

Boston 

33 21 

22 21— 97 


Washington 25 19 U 18 — 13 

Cleveland HUE IB — *1 

W: Howard 6-14 >4 U. CNawr 7-22 0-0 16; 
C: Hill 3-9 TJ-12 XI. Pfrf 11% #-13 4-6 28 Re- 
b o u n d s Washington S3 (Howard. Munson 
9). Ctavrtnd 30 (hhi 1 5). AssMs-Woofting- 
ton 16 (Sklles 5), Qevekmd 20 (Pile* 7). 
Indiana 26 23 19 27- 93 

Utah 30 37 21 34—117 

l: Miner 7-10 3-3 10, Scott 7-13 1-2 16; U: 

Malone M7 5-7 21. Hornoce k 7-13 « 22. Re- 
bounds— Indiana 49 uxDavts ill, Utah 40 
(Can- SI. Assists— Indiana 21 tjockoon 6), 
Utah 34 (Stockton 12). 

PhlladoleMa 22 14 36 30-U2 

Seattle 20 31 2? 33-121 

P: Wllllorm $-122-2 IS, Barm 7-149-1026: S; 
SchremPf « M 23. Gill 9-157-9 21 Povtan ID- 
Zl 2-3 23. Rebound*— Philadelphia «o (Wll- 
Itams 61. Seattle S3 ( Kemp »). A**i*t*— Phila- 
delphia If (Weatherman 51, Seattle 30 
(McMillan 101. 


Top 25 College Results 


C: Kutoc f-M M3 77. Perdue M«tt 
Armstrong 5-9 M 18 Myers 5-7 M 13; 8: 
Montrass 7-1344 18, Edward* Ml 6-i If. Re- 
beands— Chkngo 54 (Pimm 11), Boston 45 
(Ellison 11). Assists— aucooo 24 (Kerr 7), 
Boston 23 (Wesley, Douglas 5). 

Detroit 27 » 22 24- f3 

Now Yortl St 24 » 27-101 

D: Hill Mf 7-1021, DutnaraM7542<; N.Y.; 
Smith 7-17 MO 23, Ewing IMf 85 38 Re- 
brands— Detroit 35 (Hill, Millar 71, New York 
S3 I Mason 14). Assist*- — Detroit 17 fDumara 
6), New York 24 (storks ■>. 


Haw It* top U team in The Ana dated 
Press* tmurt collage basketball poll fared 
Wednesday: 2. UCLA (641 beat North Coro li- 
no State B8-00. Next; at Oregon. Thursday. 
Jan. S; 3. Arkansas (9-D beat Oklahoma 8644. 
Next: vs. Na. 20 OncIrmaN of Honolulu. Thurs- 
day; Mi Arisena (8-2) beat Richmond 95-48. 
Next: vs. Texas Tedt, Friday; 72. Georgetown 
(6-1) boat Gramtiling State 8266. Next: vs. 
Fairfield at ARCO Arena, Thursday; HL COB- 
fornla (7-8) beat Columbia 79-43. Next: vs. 
Alabama Thursday; 16 Artnaa state (8-2) 
beat Pacific 6658 Next: «. Vanderbilt, 
Thursday : 77. Georgia Teen (7-2) lost to No.20 
Cincinnati 4966. Next: v% Oklahoma at Homy 
lulu, Thursday; 26 Oncunatt (Ml beat No. 17 
Georgia Tech 6646 Vex): vs. Na 3 Arkansas 
at Honolulu, Thursday; 26 Indiana 176) boat 
Eastern Kentucky 97-49. Next: vs. Artonsas- 
Utite Rock. Thursday. 

Other Major College Scores 


EAST 

Cent. Connecticut St 77, $>. Fronds. NY 43 
N. Illinois 68 Niagara 60 
New Hampshire 81. Navy 79 
Providence 98 Oklahoma SL 78 
Vtlkmava 88 Rider 49 

SOUTH 

Bradley a Mississippi 4) 

Fla international 86 Lamar 54 


George Mason 86 Miss, valley si. B0 
Hartford 49. Cent. Ftarfdo 65 
LSU ws, Georgia SL 70 
Minnesota 76 James Madison 48 
Murray SL 1(0. Milligan 82 
South Florida 87. Bowler 75 
Tuiane 97, Bethune-Cookmon 46 
UNLV 56 Miami 55 

Vo. ComnxmwMtth 7f, ML St Mary's. Md. 55 
Virginia Tech 73. Tennessee 64 
W. Kentucky 78. Aleu-BlrmbtghaRi 54 
MIDWEST 

Bawling Green 78), TtMn 82 
Butler 56 Wls.-Gr*en Bay 43 
Illinois St. 82. St Marys, cat. 72 
Kent 86 Siena 79 
Miami. Ohio 77, Loyola lit 40 
Purdue 89. Weber SL 75 
St. Louis 71, Austin Pear 54 
Xavier, Ohio 77. MA-SaMlrm County SB 
SOUTHWEST 
Holy Crass 7$. Rice 7* 

Niched* st. 98 Steanon F-Austm 84 
TexoS'Arllnaton of SW Texas St* ppd, 

FAR WEST 

Idaho SI. 78 Chapman 52 
Montana 108 Co] Poly-SLO 54 
8 Utah 79. N. Arizona 65 
UC Santo Barbara ft. Layma Marymounl 72 
Ulan si. 86 LewteClar* St. 62 
TOURHMMStm 
A5CQ Holiday Classic 
First Begad 
Kings. Pa. 88 Dickinson 50 
WWener 57, Hilbert 51 

ASU-Trlbun* classic 
First Round 

VanderMlf 91 Cleveland St. 44 

Bank One Fiesta Bawl Closilc 
First Rooms 
Texas Tech 47, Penn St 6) 

Cowboy Shootout 
Championship 

Mississippi St. 61. Wyoming 57 
Third Place 

Monmouth, NJ. 71. St. Joseph's 62 
CSU5 Capitol Classic 
First Roand 

Fairfield 76 Sacramento Sr. 43 
Far West Classic 
Cbamnfoashlp 
Oregon 78 Notre Dame 49 
Third Place 

George Washington 77. Oregon at. 70 
Homier Classic 
First Round 

ArfcHJtfle Rock 77, Pepperdtne 62 


Jones Intertable Lob© UtvttaflwMl 
First Round 
N£ Charlene 76 Brawn 53 
New Mexico 86 CS Northrfdge 73 
OKs Sp enfcmeir Classic 
First Round 

Alabama 88 Texas Christian 44 
Penst-loon Classic 
First Round 

Buffalo 76 MXrGreemfaoro 48 
Iona 88 Harvard 57 

Rainbow Ctasctc 

Plrjj na u nd 

Setaa Hat l Mea d ow! n nds Tourtwro m t 
First Round 

5eton Hall 96 Lehigh » 

Southern Col 91, Southern Ataffc. 73 
Sierra Medical Canter Sun Classic 
Chaaipfaufcto 
Texas 86 Washington St. 81 
Third Place 

T nae-EI Paso 77, r*xas-Pan Amerfeon 4 1 
UNO Christmas Tournament 
ChompkxnMP 
New Orleans 58 Princeton 43 
Third Place 

Rhode Island 87, Texas ABM 68 


Sheffield Wednesday & Coventry 1 
Wimbledon L West Ham 8 
SfandUtgs: Blackburn 46 paints. Manches- 
ter Untted 46 Liverpool 39, Newcastle 39. Nof- 
Knohom Forest 39, Leeds 38 Norwich 30. Tot- 
tenham 30, Arsenal 26 Chelsea 26 Manchester 
aiy 36 Wbnbtodon 26 Sheffield Wednesday 
Z7, Southampton 26 Coventry 26 Crydul Pah 
ace 28 Queens Park Rangers 26 West Horn 28 
Aston Villa 26 EvertoiiTf. Leicester 16 Im- 
urtchU. 


V *v .327* 


SECOND TEST 

South Africa vs. New Zaatand, fourth day 
Thursday, hi Durban, Sooth Africa 
New Zealand 1st Innings: IBS 
South Africa 1st timings: 224 
New Zealand 2d innings: 192 (ail out) 
South Africa 2d utnkm: 47-1 (if avert) 
SECOND TEST 

AustraBo vs. Engfand, final day 
TTmredny, In MeflxwnK 
Australia 1st innings: 279 and 320 lor Tdecl. 
England 1st buttons: 212' 

England 2d Innings: 9M 

Result: Australia wan 6v 295 runs. 

Australia leads five-match series 2-8 




ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Aston Villa 8 Chelsea 0 
Blackburn vs. Leeds. PtKL watertogged field 
iRlwfch 6 Arsenal 2 
Liverpool 8 Manchester City 0 
Manchester united 8 Lelcesw 7 
Queens Park Rangers 8 Southampton 2 


BASEBALL 

American LeaEuf 

BALTIMORE— Signed Jeff Humn. mfleld- 
ar, to minor leag ue umfrm.1 . 

NattOKd League ^ 

SAN DIEGO— Traded FUJI Ptantter Jfrl 
Derek BoiLoutfleMere; Pedro Martinez and 
Doug BrocaiL pitchers; and Crate Shipley 
and Rlcfcv GutHera Infl e t de n ; to Houston 
for Ken Caminiti. mlrd basenm; Steve Fin- 
lev. aufffefder; Andufar Cedenaand RtemTa 
Petaobw, I nfleWers; Brian wnRama.nl trijer; 

. and a nfavar to be nomed tetm. .. 

BASKETBALL 

NaUoaal BaskalbaM AseecMtan 
BOSTON W aived Tarty Harris, guard. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football League 
GREEN BAY— Put Morois Wlhon, running 
back, on Inlured reserve. Re-shned Keith 
Crawford, wide receiver. Signed Jonathan 
Kirktay, Mmsiy m lineman, .to eraettee 

NEW ORLEANS— Fired Steve SMWtlL de- 
fensive coord motor, end John Peaee.defen- 
stve Une coach. 

HOCKEY 

National Hockey League 
TORONTO— Assigned Trenl Cull, defense- 
men, to Brantford. Colonial Hockey League. 

COLLEGE 

AR IZON A STATE— Named Lrie Sefanadi 
assistant coach for bisJde linebackers. ' 
CL EMSON— Announced Davtn Gray, se- 
nior basketball center, has been ruled aca- 
demically Ineligible tar second semester.- 
Ll NDE NWOOD— Named Don Kretser foot- 
ball coach. 

MINNESOTA Mai n od Mark Towunordohl 
todtol) merv M na coandlnamr and coach of 
the tight ends and medal teams. 






















f \&o\ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1994 


Page 21 


PORTS 


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Autissier Sighted, Boat Demasted 
And Adrift in Indian Ocean Stom 


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Isabelle Autissier’s demasted yadrt was adrift in gale- whipped 26-foot seas when spotted by the AnstraHan air force place. 


Con^Ued bj Ow Staff Freni Dtspatdta 

SYDNEY — The French sailor Isabelle 
Autissier has been sighted aboard her crip- 
pled yacht, adrift in huge seas in the Indian 
Ocean, but as erf late Thursday no radio 
contact had been made with her as search 
aircraft shadowed the demasted boat. 

Autissier, in the 60-foot (18 meter) Ecux- 
eml Poitou Cbareantes EL, was competing in 
the BOC Challenge, (be aroimd-th e-world 
nee for solo sailors, when she sent two 
distress signals Wednesday. 

About 100 naval personnel had been 
recalled from Christmas leave to man the 
-missile frigate Darwin, which was 
sent to her area from Fremantle. 
The Darwin has a helicopter aboard and 
could lift the 38-year-old French sailor off 
her yacht if necessary. But the frigate will 
be unlikely to reach Autissier. who was 
more than 800 nautical miles south of 
Australia, before late Saturday. 

Autissier had managed to lash a life raft 
and sea-rescue pack, dropped from the 
search plane, to the ride of her boat, ac- 
cording to a Australian Maritime Safety 
Authority spokesman, Keith Hooper. 

“Two packs were dropped. One drifted 
away, but she got the second,” he said. 
“But she has not managed to get to radios 
included in the pack and make contact 


with an Orion aircraft which has taken 
over the shadowing operation.” 

The winds, he said, were between 50 and 
60 knots and the seas between eight and 12 
meters (26 and 39 feet). 

‘ for her was like looking for a 
pin in the Grand Canyon.” he added. 

The BOC race director, Mark Schrader, 
said: “If she simply had no mast, had been 
dismasted, and the yacht was riding on top 
of the water she would be riding along at a 
pretty good speed. She is not, so it is 
probably full of water and my guess is that 
somehow it has either been holed, rolled 
over and the mast lost.” 

But Michael Taylor, an official at the 
Australian Maritime Rescue Coordination 
Center in Canberra, said visual checks 
from the Australian Air Force Orient cir- 
cling the yacht had not seen any holes in 
the Bull 

He said crackling and “virtually unintel- 
ligible” radio contact had been received. 

Autissier, the race’s lone woman en- 
trant, was spotted earlier Thursday bv an 
air force Hercules, 18 hours after she set 
off distress beacons. Hooper said Autissier 
stood up and waved to tne aircraft. 

There were no commercial ships report- 
ed in the area, which is off the main ship- 


ping channels. Race officials said earlier in 
the day that they had pul Minora Saito, a 
Japanese BOC racer 360 miles to the north 
of Autissier, on alert 

Nigel Rowe, skipper of Sky Catcher, the 
48-foot BOC yacht that had been 250 miles 
to the northeast of Autissier, reported that 
his boat’s rudder had jammed and that its 
tiller had broken in apparently the same 
storm that hit Autissier, 

It was the second time in a month that 
her boat had been demasted, after she won 
the opening leg of the race, from Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, to Cape Town, in 
record time. 

The 83-foot mast on Ecureuil was torn 
off by a gale when she was about 1,000 
miles into the second leg. She Fixed a 
makeshift rig with the boat’s spinnaker 
pole, and sailed on to the Kerguelen Is- 
lands, midway in the Indian Ocean, for 
repairs. She left there with a new, but 
smaller mast on Dec. 17. 

Autissier, an engineer and marine sci- 
ence professor from La Rochelle, is a vet- 
eran sailor who competed in the 1990-91 
BOC race. In May, with a crew of three, 
she broke the New York-San Francisco 
record around Cape Horn by 17 days in 
the same boat. fAfp Reuters, AP, NYT) 


China Pulls Killer Waves in California Claim the Life of a Surfing Legend 


Swim Team 
From Meet 
In Hong Kong 

Agenee Franc*- Prase 

BEUING — China’s swim 
- cam has pulled out of next 
: nonth’s short-course World 
Cup opening meet in Hong 
Kong, the Chinese Swimming 
Federation’s vice president. 
Yuan Jiawei, said Thursday. 

1 cord-breaking team. 



rocked by seven pos- 

fg tests at the Asian 

Games in Hiroshima, is also 
doubtful for the other six World 
Cup meets, in England, France, 
Germany, Italy, the Nether- 
lands and Sweden, Yuan said. 
S3e cited fatigue, budget con- 
straints and visa problems. 

“The has been under a 
lot of strain recently” Yuan 
said. “We have just finished in 
Hhoshihfii 'and the swimmers 
are tired and need time to recu- 
perate." 

, But he strongly denied that 
'the decision stemmed from fed- 
eration fears that participation 
in Hong Kong might remit in 
another doping scandal 

"That is nonsense,” he said. 
“There is absolutely no link be- 
tween this decision and the 
Asian Games incident” in Oc- 

- lober, which led to world cham- 
pions Ln Bin and Yang Aihua, 
among others, being banned 
from competition for two years. 

Yuan said the main difficulty 
■with the Hong Kong meet was 
-getting visas in time. He said 
team members were now spread 
all across China and there was 
not enough time to collect their 
passports and go through the 
'visa formalities. 

As for the other meets, Yuan 
■said a decision would be made 
-following a review of budget 
.'limitations and China’s domes- 
tic swimming program. 

- “The decision will be made at 
the highest level," be said. 


By Tom Friend 

Nc*> York Tuna Service 

HALF MOON BAY, California — 
This beach needs lifeguards or a 
priest The body of an expert surfer 
washed ashore here at Pillar Point 
last Friday, swallowed by waves that 
grow like weeds, and yet his peers are 
already leaping back in. 

They are virtual kamflc»7* pilots, 
baited tty swells the size of two-stoty 
condominiums. A sign stamped in 
the sand Wednesday said. “Danger: 
Extremely Hazardous Waves,” and if 
that is not warning enough, they can 
read the obituaries of Mark Foo, 
world-class surfer, as well as two 
boaters who drowned Monday, 50 
miles (80 kilometers) up the shore. 

‘The ocean has beat taking this 
year,” said Jeff Clark, a local surfer 
who first rode these skyscrapers back 
in 1975. 

The waves here even have a title — 
Maverick’s — and they were juiced 
the week before Christmas by a rug- 
red cold front straight out of Alaska. 
Foo, who tracked the storm like a 
weatherman, flew here overnight 
firms Hawaii last Friday to measure 


them for himself, and his first ride, on 
no sleep, was his last. 

“They say if you fall in those 
waves, the intensity of it wfl] rip your 
wet suit off and turn it inside out,” 
said Trent Freitas of nearby Vallqo, 
staring at the 30-fool breakers but 
not quite bold enough to paddle in. 

Foo was not so squeamish. He had 
surfed the largest waves since his 
teens and had little trepidation about 
diving in. He conquered an initial 
curl of water last Friday, but was 
tugged under and, according to medi- 
cal examiners, likely knocked uncon- 
scious tty his own surfboard. His 
board, smashed in two and leashed to 
his leg, then turned into the anchor 
that drowned him. 

Pillar Point Harbor has turned into 
a spectacle because of the raging 
northern California coast and public- 
ity that this week had surfers alter- 
nately livid and reflective. They were 
less worried about a repeat catastro- 
phe than about the loss of their sa- 
cred surfing ground. 

Surfers, by rule, are provincial and 
Pillar Point was their somewhat pri- 
vate escape until about three years 


ago, when the secret of Maverick’s 
began to circulate. The first sign of 
trouble was the construction of a dirt 
parking lot Thai, last week, televi- 
sion cameras, blimps and even a golf- 
er — who began driving balls off a 
diff — were on the scene. 

It was the Maverick's that attract- 
ed Foo, 36, the staling legend of 


do, and he told me often he would die 
young. It was nothing morbid, but be 
loved taking chances. 

“1 have no feeling that I should 
have talked him out of going to Pillar 
Paint. Because 1 accept him for who 
he was and what he lived for. He was 
not a thrill-seeker in general. He did 
not drive fast, ditfcn try to climb 


Mark Foo flew in from Hawaii for his first ride on 
the waves called Maverick’s. It was his last. 


Haldwa, Hawaii He was known as 
the Joe Montana of Big Waves and 
was a do-it-all: broadcaster, author, 
businessman, health enthusiast, trav- 
eler. He kept hearing about the dan- 
ger of Pillar Point and wanted to see 

iL 

It flJa s not uncommon for Foo. a 
man of wealth, to pick up, on an 
hour’s notice, and fty straight to an 
ocean storm. 

“He’d fly to Tahiti in a minute,” 
his sister, Shariyn Foo- Wagner said 
Wednesday, the day of his funeraL 
“He did exactly what he wanted to 


mountains. Only surfing, only surf- 
ing.” 

It was Foo’s notion that Hawaii’s 
Waimea Bay and Mexico’s Todos 
Santos were the proving grounds for 
big-wave surfers, but nothing appar- 
ently prepared him for cold-water 
Maverick’s, where the waves reach 
perhaps 40 feet. 

T don't surf Maverick’s,” said Eric 
Nelson of nearby Montara, who is 
producing a surfing documentary. 
“It’s not a regular wave. It’s like com- 
paring a Formula One race car to a 
go-cart Listen, the next time you see 


a two-story house, lay on your back 
and look up at the roof. That’s how 
big the wave is.” 

Nelson’s surfing brother, Alan, in- 
terrupted: “They should get the Gui- 
ness Book of World Records out 
there. The wave doesn’t even know 
bow big it is. It’s like a football field 
and a half. That’s how long the wave 
is. It just peels and peels and peels. It 
keeps reding.” 

More than 50 people saw the water 
envelope Foo last Friday, although 
not a ringje one knew to ay for help. 
According to an expert surfer and 
eyewitness, Shawn Rhodes, Foo con- 
quered his first wave but “didn’t have 
a transition together” for the next 
one. “His board skipped out, and he 
basically just ate it,” Rhodes said. 

But his body was not found until 
an hour later, when Foo’s equally 
well-known surfing partners and 
travel companions. Brock Little and 
Mike Parsons, located him face down 
in the harbor, his head apparently 
bloodied by the surfboard. The glare 
from the sun had shielded their eye- 
sight and perhaps prevented his res- 
cue. As a result, they thought he had 


gone back for a new board and had 
no clue he was drowning. 

Evidently, there had been some 
miscalculating on Foo’s part. The 
wave he chose was only 18 to 20 feet 
high, hat the wind had shifted and 
was forcing the surf toward the rocks. 

“Maybe they’re not the biggest 
waves in the world,” Clark said, “but 
they’re probably the meanest By the 
way the wave breaks, it displaces so 
much water so quickly. There are un- 
der 100 surfers in the whole world who 
want any part erf this surf. People who 
think they can go out there, just spin 
and go on a 20-foot wave have got 
anotba think coming. It just goes to 
show no matter hcrw prepared you are. 
you’re in Neptune's playground. It 
dishes it out at wflL Tne ocean has no 
conscience. It does not care.” 

The same Maverick’s, three days 
later, capsized a 10-foot inflatable 
raft up the coast in Tamales Bay, 
lolling Gaylene Derate, 34, of Napa 
and her 1 0-year-old son, Michael 
And, as a peculiar result, Pillar Point 
is today a tourist attraction that 
draws at least 2,000 gawking people 
every afternoon. 


SIDELINES 


Thieves Score Off Hockey Players 

RED DEER, Alberta (AP) — Thieves broke into about 40 hotel 
rooms and stole an undetermined amount of money from players 
of the Czech, Russian and German teams at the world junior ice 
hockey championship, police said. 

“You don’t expect this kind of thing in Red Deer, Canada,” a 
Russian team official said as his players boarded a bus on their 
way to practice. “Maybe in New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, 
but not in the American Midwest or in Red Deer, Canada.” 

Sharpe Needs Surgery on Vertebrae 

GREEN BAY, Wisconsin (AP) — Sterling Sharpe, the Green 
Bay Packers’ five-time Pro Bowl receiver, needs surgery to fuse the 
top two vertebrae in his neck, the team physician said. 

Trainer Pepper Bums said the injury, which developed gradual- 
ly, resulted from unusual looseness between the top two vertebrae, 
which move and pinch Sharpe’s spinal cord. 

For die Record 

Abe Puffin, who owns the NBA’s Bullets and NHL’s Capitals, 
announced that he will pay for building an $ 180-million arena for 
the teams in downtown Washington. (WP) 

Tom Flores, who won only 14gaznes in three seasons at Seattle, 
was fired as coach of the NFL Seahawks. (AP) 

No. IB-ranked Virginia beat Texas Christian, 20-10, in the 
Independence Bowl as Mike Grob passed for one touchdown and 
Kevin Brooks rushed for 1 14 yards. (AP) 


No. 3 Arkansas and No. 20 Cmcinnati 
Still En Route for End of Rainbow 


The Associated Pros 

firing together four of 
best college basketball 
grams in the United States, 
dueling the national champion, 
and you might get some terrific 
games. 

The Rainbow Classic was the 
place to be Wednesday night as 
NCAA champ Arkansas, 
ranked third, rallied from a 15- 
point second-half deficit to beat 
Oklahoma, 86-84. In the other 
first-round game, No. 20 Cin- 
cinnati held off No. 17 Georgia 
Tech, 69-66. 

Tim Razorbacks (9-1) trailed 
by 51-36 with 17:46 to play be- 
fore turning to their vaunted 
pressure defense to force Okla- 
homa (7-1) into turnover after 
turnover as they chipped away 
at the lead. 

“Oklahoma probably out- 


played us in every aspect of the c 

the game except going down the dump after a three-game span 
pro- stretch, when things went in our in which he had 94 points. He 
i. in- favor" said Arkansas' coach, had 7 in the Bearcats’ loss to 


ing, continued his scoring 
dump after a three-game span 


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Nolan Richardson. “Our kids 
found a way to win, and that’s 
what I told them at halftime.” 

The Razorbacks took the 
lead for good at 81-79 on a 3- 

l)0IJJQEfflGHUaaTS 

pointer by Clint McDaniel with 
1:11 to play en route to their 
ninth consecutive victory. 

“The dock: ran out on us,” 
said Oklahoma’s coach, Kelvin 
Sampson. “Another minute and 
we may have wot iL* 

Corliss Williamson led Ar- 
kansas with 19 points, 15 in the 
second half, and Scotty Thur- 
man had 16. 

Ryan Minor led the Sooners, 
who lost their first game under 
Sampson, with 31 points. 

Not 20 Gnchmsfi 69, Na 17 
Georgia Tech 66: Minus two 
starters and with their best 
shooter, LaZefle Durden, still in 
a funk, the Bearcats (8-3) 
knocked off the Yellow Jackets 
(7-2) as freshman Danny Fort- 
son gpt 20 pants and nine re- 
bounds while Darnell Burton 
added 16 pants. 

Durden, who holds every 
school record for 3-paint sboot- 


Califoraia before they headed 
to Honolulu, and managed 9 on 
4-for-14 shooting against Geor- 
gia Tech. 

Na 2 UCLA 88, North Caro- 
lina State 80: The host Brains 
won their sixth straight by out- 
scoring the Wolfpack (5-2) by 
20-6 over the end of the first 
half and the start erf the second. 
Ed 0*Bannon had 21 points 
and Tyus Edney added 20. 

George Zidek, a Czech, play- 
ing college basketball in front 
of his father for the first imt , 
opened the game with a 6-foot 
hook, a shot that made his fa- 
ther, Jiri, one of Europe’s best 
shooters in the early 1970s. 

“It’s in the genes, because I 
lived off that shot for many 
years,” Jiri Zidek said through a 
translator. 

No. 12 Georgetown 83, 
Gr amb fing 66c Freshman Align 
Iverson kid 27 points and five 
steals as No. 12 Georgetown 
wot its sixth straight after an 
opening loss to Arkansas. The 
Hoyas advanced to the title 
of the Sacramento Holi- 
ly Classic against Fairfield, 
which beat host Sacramento 
State: 



Oman Um/TV Anocnted Prcn 

Loo Roe, who got 27 points, was blocked by Arijan 
Komazec as Na 4 Massachusetts was beaten, 102-95, by 
the Italian chib team Cagiva-Varese and lost its third 
straight in (be Buckler Christmas Challenge m Strasbourg, 
France. Komazec scored 43 points, 31 in die second half. 


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Page 22 


ENTEBNAllONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30 , 19 $$*; 




::U$C: 


POSTCARD 


The Confetti Visionary 

By Mary Davis Sure 

HtaUr^foR Pm Service 

\TE 7 ASHINGT 0 N —For Jim 
▼▼ WaUdns, a construction 
contractor, musical comedy 
Star and stand-up comic, busi- 
ness is finally falling into place 
00 Broadway. On the pave-- 
that is. 

And to think, all it took was a 
f ew-*craps of paper. 

•wter Fetti Inc., Watkins’s 
company in Gaithersburg, 

Maryland, makes confetti. Not 
jusJ any confetti. Flutter Fetti 
a patented rectangular 
shrfpc and a bang time to rival 
of a Reggie Roby punt. 

And hang time really matters 
^people who care about con- 
fetti. “whenever I’ve been able 
to give a live demonstration and 
show people how Flutter Fetti 
floats,” Watkins says, “I’ve got- 
ten a contract." 

Indeed. Terri Maruca, the 
Washington Bullets advertising 
and promotions manager, says 
the tissue paper stuff is abso- 
lutely wonderful. 

“We’ve used it far several 
events last season, including a 
Draft Day party in June, a half- 
time wedding ceremony and the 
season finale. There were four 
or five Flutter Fetti cannons 
going off at once, and because 
of the force and the volume of 


confetti that was falling, the ef- 
fect was really incredible." 

□ 

John Kakaledk of Balloon 
Bouquets of New York, a bal- 
loon decorating and special-ef- 
fects company that handled the 
displays for the Democratic 
National Convention, says he 
met Watkins at an event in New 
York a few years ago and was 
sold immediately. 

“He showed me his product 
then and I've been pushing it 
ever since,” he says, “when you 
mix it with streamers and bal- 
loons the effect is fabulous.” 

When Radio City Music Hall 
wanted a snowstorm of its own 
for the premiere of this year’s 


remake of “Miracle on 34tb 
Street," cannons filled with a 
combination of white Flutter 
Fetti and corkscrew-shaped 
confetti produced a 30-minute 
blizzard from the balcony. Even 
Robert Redford was impressed. 

Until recently, the big, burly 
man with a shock of gray hair, 
often hidden under a cap, cut 
sheet of tissue paper and 
fed every confetti cannon 
by hand. 

D 

"I signed a $100,000-a-year. 
contract with Busch Gardens in 
March of 1993 and I was still 
cutting everything with a single- 

edge razor,” he recalls with a 
grin. “When I sat down to fig- 
ure out costs, I had to think in 
terms of two blades per pound 
and a half of confetti. It was 
ridiculous.” 

After this first big contract, 
he invested in a machine cutter. 
But some things haven’t 
changed. 

Watkins often drives from his 
home to his office at 1 A. M. 
because that’s when he’s really 
in tune with his confetti. There, 
in the quiet of the night, be sees 
fluttering visions and then he 
starts creating with tissue and 
blades. 

“There's nothing I can't do 
with confetti,” he maintains. “1 
can make it shoot out of any- 
thing and with different ef- 
fects.” 

His partner and vice prcs- 
dint, Cathy Guzauskas, is usu- 
ally the first to know of his late- 
night creations. More often 
than not she arrives at her desk 
in the morning to find it en- 
gulfed by a sea of tissue bits. 

Asked to explain Watkins's 
obsession with the stuff, she an- 
swers matter-of-factly: “He's 
just a 49-year-old man who's 
going on 6." 

But Watkins puts a different 
spin on it 

*Tve just always gone off on 
little tangents,” he explains. “I 
you could call it a been- 
done-that kind of life." 


Freedom? A Scary Thought for 



By Martha Sherrill' 

'•■aahuigun Post Service 


WASHINGTON — Control. Maybe that’s how 

VY she survived, pulkd herself out of the dark sea 
of drowning child stars, kept going, pushed on, 
walking that tough-thighs walk of hers, applying 
that inhwngp focus and intelligence, evolving from 
bare-butt Ctrapertone giri to pudgy Yale under grad 
to H anni bal teeter’s favorite patient, wrestling her- 
self away from a stage mother, winning two Acade- 
my Awards, directing “Little Man Tate,” building a 
meganuliioa-doHar production company and be- 
coming, along the way, Jodie Foster — a 32-year-old 
movie star with absolutely no mystique. 

“No mystitme?” She's got a smoky, throaty sound 
— a cheerleader’s voice two days after the big home- 
coming game. A dumb giggle comes, then a knowing 
smirk. “Because I am me most boxing person," she 
says. “Yeah, I am. Didn't you know that?” 

Her tips are done in dark red. She wears a prim 
navy pantsuit and her perfectly straight hair is chin- 
length. She has a loveliness and delicacy, eyes so 
blue, teeth so white, skin — skin like a paper Chinese 
lantern lit up with a soft 40-watt bulb — but the 
fragility is an her face and not behind it. 

You can almost imagine her being sexy in a 
Lauren Bacall sort of way, a husky-voiced noncha- 
lant predator. But Bacall can go animal, and vulner- 
able. She gets slow. With Foster, it’s like her brain 
never shuts off. Or the electric fence around her. 

“I’m a pretty defended person,” she says coolly, 
briskly, as though her peisonality were a piece of 
tissue in a jar on a shelf in a lab and she's just 
brought it down for slicing. 

“I’m not somebody who’s particularly emotional- 
ly available.” she says. “I never have been. It’s not 
my style. I wasn’t the kind of Idd who cried all the 
time. Or the one who put a lampshade on their head 
and danced around and said, ^Look at me.’ I just 
wasn’t like that- I've always been more internal and 
cerebral and my life has always been from my chin 

H 

Up. 

Control She needs it and she fights it Acting 
involves surrender, and Foster hates to surrender. 

“This job can be liberating for somebody like 
me,” she says of acting, letting go, bringing down the 
fence. “It’s not my normal way of being in the world 
I’m very socialized” In “Neal,” her newest movie, 
she plays a woman raised in the wild who dances 
naked m the moonlight, speaks her own language, 
screams and scratches ana . . . 

“And, well,” Foster says, “making this film was 
the biggest panic of my life.” 

Freedom is the problem. When Foster got out of 
college, at Yale, she lapsed into a six-month depres- 
sion, she says, the result of endless open skies of no 
plans and no focus. She thrives on limitations and 
scripted life. Routine. She thought then she might 
give up acting entirely, since the roles coming 



. over and die on screen.** As m u ch as she has tried 

“Thafs why, originally, I thought I stunk in The 
Accused,* ” she says, referring to her perfamaiice as. 
a rape victim, for which she won an Oscar in 1989. *T 
thought rd let everybody down — I just couldn’t tit 
on the witness stand and cry and emote the way the 
director wanted me to. I hated so much having to be 
a victim." 

But she has played victims, and you can see her 
straggle, her coolness, her sdf-disgust She doesn't 
want to be a loser. She doesn't want us to see her 
characters suffer too much- So what we witness, 
eventually, are strong women subjected to ordeals 
and withstanding them. We see courage. Stoicism. 

Even at tfvears dd, playing the skinny, preco- 
cious Iris in “Taxi Driver, Foster exudes a startling 
invulnerability and lack of tenderness. In “Som- 
mersby,” the man she loves is hanged and she barely 

rh^ iTiy - ^ hex fr fjpl 

As Gance Starling in "Tbe-Sflmce of the Lambs*" 
she’s tortured emotionally by Hannibal Lector, by 
Iris insights about her — and is too proud to let him 
see It 

Tt*s fun to play someone who has four different 
layers," says roster of her 1991 Academy Award- 
winning poformance. “And for most of the charac- 
ters 1 play, a bog emotional outburst wouldn't be 
appropriates” 

Lately she has been feeling secure enough to take 
some chances, to experiment with hex career. Last 
year, she took a role as a saloon vixen in “Maverick.” 

Ghooringthc role of Nell was another experim ent 
Another departure, perhaps greater. 

“She’s the opposite erf me, ox so I thought She 
appeals foolish — and a woman who lives with hear, 
emotions on the outahte because she doesn’t know 
to be ashamed. 



HU OfxuyTbc WMMqpon Pm 

“My life has always been from my chin up.” 

way were lousy, passed aver by leaser actresses. 

Working on a novel at home, she grew restless, 
then panicky. “Wheat I could write about anything I 
wanted, for as long as I wanted, I froze op,” six says. 
And then she realized that “working for a living, I’d 
just been following instructions, landing cm the 
yellow piece of tape, repeating my lines as memo- 
rized, and them get a pat on toehead. And I liked it." 
Freedom scares her? 

“Oh, yeah. Doesn't it scare you?" 

She never really risks it all, flops around on the 
screen, loose, on the edge, unstable, Calling apart 
The an for Foster is in her effortless technique, not 
unpredictabilitY. She doesn't do, as she puts it 
“drool acting." She also can’t m hex words, “roll 


fs something so true and sincere and im- 
portant about Nell because she tells us who we used 
to be, who we are really Hire," says Foster. “Human 
beings really do want to connect We do. I don’t 
drink we are dying to be alienated, because, well, 
that’s no fun. I think we want to connect and have 
contact and have some communication with each 
other.” 

At home in Los Angeles, she has no home mailing 
address, communicates with friends and colleagues 
mostly by e-mail, lives in a rented house with rented 
furniture. She is guarded about her personal life, not 
only with members of the media but with most 
everybody, it seems. 

“I never wanted to be famous," she says. “I don’t 
know why anyone would — unless you were 25 years 
<rid and nobody had ever paid any attention to you. 

“Oh, and I suppose if you were unself-consdous 
and performative, did imitations and things like 
that, that you would love the idea that your public 
life and your private life would somehow be meshed 
and you'd love to show people who you were. I'm. 
not uke that” 


Japan’sRoyal Fc 
Gets a N&v Addidon 

Princess Rko, who is ma-; C' 
ried to Prince AJdshfao, th!.T 
younger son of Japan’s Bnpei W 
or Akflrito, gsye birth, to 
second child Thursday, a baby^ *- 
pri weighing 2.77 kilograms 
pounds, 1 ounce). Mother anc ; . •' 
child are in good condition, the 
serial Household Agency " ' 
The baby’s mate will be- J 
announced Jan. 4. - y - 

□ . ' • 

Throughout 1995, beginning £££ > 
with his 90th birthday on Jan. 2, : 

Sr Michael Tippett wiD be hon- * 
ored around toe musical world 'V- 
in tributes to Britain’s most enri- ; 
neat living composer. On his 
birthday, Tippett will attend a 
concert of 'songs and piano and 
guitar music at London's Wig- 
more HalL On Jan. 7-8 in Berlin, 
Vhdunr Ashkenazy will con - 
duct Tippett’s wartime oratorio, 

“A Child of Out Time. ” HlS mu- 
ac also win be featured in six 
concerts of the London Sympho- .£$ 
ny Orchestra and S fr Cofin Da- v 
to at London's Barbican. 

□ ' 

British photographers on ya- .* 
cation celebrity watch in Swiss 
si d resorts scrambled to get to 
Vafi, Colorado, with the news : * 
that P rin ce ss Diana has ..been 
seen cm toe slopes there -wiriftA- 


54-year-oJd Wan Street million- 
aire, Teddy Foratmann. Her es- 
tranged husband. Prince 
Charles, is expected to turn up 
next week with their two sons, 
William and Harry, in Klosters, 
Switzerland, a favored resort 
for Europe's royals. 

□ 

A Cairo court on Thursday 
banned the screening of a film 
by the Egyptian director You- 
sef Chahtne, saying it broke Is- 
lam's ban on the di 
apostles when it 
of the prophet J< 

Emigrant," set is 
times, tells the st 
man who goes to 
cape persecution 1 
brothers. Chahine 
his film tells the story of Jc 



WEATHER 


Europe 



To My 

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Foracasl for Saturday through Monday, as provided by Accti- Weather. Asia 



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Riki la duty on Saturday In 
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and fluntea h CWcago- Sun- 
day and Monday wffl ba blua- 
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shower* tie possible on 
Sunday: otharwiM. the 
weekend will be dry and 
mtt. 


Europe 

hfifiti wtnds wN buftat Frank- 
fut, Berth end Hamburg tnfai 
weekend. Heavy enow wilt 
Banket Osto. wMe a mimiii 
of rein, enow end sleet 
occurs from Copenhagen to 
Stockholm. Rone win lum 
cooler with a lew Bhowera. 
Heavy rains wfl move Into 
Greece by Monday while 
Romania has rain and snow. 


Asia 

Japan and Koraa will be 
briek and chilly Saturday 
through Monday. Hie meali- 
er anil be generally dry 
axcept tor snow showers In 
northern Japan. Dry weather 
rs also expected tn Hong 
Kong through the weekend. 
Singapore wiR be hot and 
humid with the occasional 
thunders hower . 


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Latin America 


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WEEKEND SKI REPORT 


Depth Mta. Roe. Snow Leat 

rnir - - - - 


Peade laCesa SO 70 Fair Open Ver 22/12 PwoortBOH open ' 

Stikm 20 40 Fo/r. Art Var 22/12 Open rum rwuonaUy gout 



17*1 

14*7 PO 

17*2 

13/55 1 

CipaTaMt 

26/77 

14*7 1 

30*8 

14*7 ah 

faaatilanra 

16*9 

12*3 dl 20*6 

12*3 po 

Hm 

21/70 

7/44 a 

2 */ 7 B 

B /48 t 

las. 

TUria 

31*6 

24/75 pc 

ZB *4 

28/77 1 

am 

•ms pe am 

1308 pa 

21/70 

9/48 a 

17*2 

1203 dl 

North America 

Aretano* 

- 4/25 

- 6/18 c 

- 3/27 

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On 

a /46 

6/41 r 

9/48 

002 ah 

BoWsi 

2/36 

402 a 

4 / 3 B 

0/27 c 

a*H 5 po 

206 

- 1/31 0 

- 1/31 

■ 12/11 F 

Dunuar 

409 

- 6/16 # 

409 

- 11/13 a 


AwBtrta 

tachgl 

15 75 

Fair 

Opto 

War 22/12 34 Mrcparc MMnUMgood 

KHzbuhoi 

10 20 

Fair 

(*W 1 . 

Var 22/12 8fX** gating bmvy - ■ 

Oborgurgl 

20 BO 

Fa* 

Opan 

Var 22/12 0 mw above 2300m 

Rchladming 

10 SO 

Fa* 

Son* 

Var 22/12 Upper rum *& good 

SLAnton 

5110 

Fob 

Opan 

Hvy 28/12 21/32 Ms, good above 1000m 

Franoe 

Alpod’Huoz 

15 IX 

Fair 

Art 

Hvy 27/12 16 petes Odaoia 

Las Area 

10130 

Won 

Soma 

var 27/12 29/34 m. eompetctm 

Avortaz 

30 80 

Fair 

Open 

Hvy 28/12 38/42 m. ptaaa busy 

Ctwmonte 

0200 

Fair 

Cted 

var 20/12 23/46 Ue open 

Courchavat 

15 70 

Worn 

Art 

var 28/12 27/68 tto. good above 2200m 

Lea Deux A! pea 

20150 

Fa* 

Soma 

Vm 28/12 36/75 Mta&od above 2500m 

Mageve 

0 10 

Cted 

CM 

V* 27/12 sktingtH noarty Lea contetnmas 

HMribal 

5 BO 

Fa* 

Art 

Vor 28/12 33/50 Ntajomr nuns paxtiy 

LaPIflgna 

20 00 

Fa* 

Worn 

Ver 28/12 40/1 12 Ms. mean nms very poor 

Sane Chavadar 

5 25 

Art 

CM 

Art 20/12 very fntodekiro. 8/72 m open 

TlgneB 

45120 

Good 

Opan 

Hvy 28/12 36/SO BOs, frasfl snow 

Vald*tstea 

45120 

Good 

Open 

Hvy 28/12 45/Sl tta open, good ptstoeKbig 

ValThorena 

40120 

Good 

Open 

Hvy 28/12 Fresh boom on herd pecked base 

Garmisch 

0125 

Fa* 

CM 

War 28/12 18/38 m frtuti snow at 2000m 

Obarstdorf 

10 55 

Fa* 

Some 

Hvy 22/12 9/27 Us, taper runs reasonable . 


Oam Ms. *m. Snow Last 

l ur - ■ - - - 


Courmayatir 

0 

70 

F*r 

Clad 

Var 27/12 21/23 Ms. 30cm ail room 

Sahra 

10 

15 

Fa* 

CM 

Vw 20/12 lOtttscpsn, BmHadSkang 

JMUJKV 

20 

20 

FFr 

Art 

Ver 20/12 5 HBacpon, doing atP very bated 

Maiwy 

Gaito 

SO 

90 

Mr 

Opart 

Va 27/12 AMm opan TOkmenee country 






* 

Baquiara-Bwet 

70100 

Good 

Opan 

Vm 22/12 QoodtMng, most m open 

wmnmmnmm 






Adaibodan 

5 

30 

Poor 

CM 

Wat 26/12 14/23 m met enow. m» 

Creno Montana 

Q 

65 

F» 

CM 

Var 27/12 14/40 m. 20cm at 2000m 

Davon 

10 

60 

Mr 

CM 

Var 20/12 32/36 BOr, wet below iWOn 

Grlndaiwtid 

5 

80 

Wat 

CM 

Hvy 21/12 8/12 Btta opan, wet am 

Klostara 

10 

60 

Fa* 

CM 

Ver 20/12 Snow toOng an upper siopm 

SLMortt* 

15 

65 

Fa* 

Soma 

var 20/12 18/24 rn. tome worn pmtms 

Varbiar 

25 106 

Fa* 

Worn 

Vbr 27/12 29/39 Sfts. fresh snow at 2000m 

Wangan 

10 

35 

Worn 

Wbm 

Hvy 21/12 11/25 66a open, wane meaner 

Zarmatt 

20145 

Good 

Soma 

Ver. 27/12 30/38 rn. generafy good &hng 

02 . 






Aapen 

75 

80 

Far 

Opan Ft*d 15/12 fit 8 Mis open 

Brock enrtbgo 

60 

80 

Fb* 

Open Pchd 20/12 A»T 7 Bftscpan 

Mammoth 

210 220 

Good 

Opan 

Var 2502 AB 30 m opon 

Steamboat 

80110 

ftnnri 

Opw 

Pckd 16/12 A8 20 eta open 

TaUuride 

80 

95 

Good 

Open 

Pckd 24/12 AB 10 IBs open 

vau 

60 

75 

Fa* 

Opan Pckd 15/12 At 25 Bits open 

WhSm 

ISO 290 

Good 

Opan Pwt* 28/12 21/26 Ms open exesBBnt siding 


Bomtk) 

Cenrtnla 

Cortina 


5 55 Hard CM 
10 200 Good Open 
15 20 ' Far Art 


Var 20/12 Be# sMtog above bomto 2000 
Vor 28/1 2 30/27 Sits, good on open wns- 
Vor 24/12 30/40 Ms. roosonoUe stetng 


Kay; Lll: Depth ki cm on lower end upper stapes, Mtn. PMee Mountainside pistes. Ree. 
Ptatee: Rims taadng to resort Art A/ttfcM snor*. . 

Reports stpptatf by tfw SW Club at Great 



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